twitches.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Vomiting up mucus or bile without anything else can sometimes indicate digestive upset or acid reflux rather than a hairball. It may be a good idea to feed meals more often or to offer a bland diet of boiled chicken to see if that helps. If a hairball is present but unable to be brought up, it may be causing a blockage in the digestive tract, and she may vomit up any food she attempts to eat. If she continues to attempt to vomit, the symptoms continue for more than a day or so, or if she appears in great distress/very ill then scheduling a veterinary appointment is best to check for other causes of illness that are causing her symptoms.

If the cause is hairballs, switching to a hairball diet, adding a hairball paste to her food and brushing her more often can all help reduce the amount of hair ingested and help break down hair ingested in the body.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Common reasons for cats to vomit foam include inflammation or irritation in the digestive system, ingestion of a foreign body such as string, internal parasites, bacterial or viral infections, systemic disease such as kidney or thyroid issues, or a food intolerance or allergy.
Most hairballs are pretty easily brought up in cats, but if your cat is having difficulty expelling a hairball it may be time to bring them into your vet. If a hairball becomes trapped inside your cat`s body, it can block up their intestines and even be fatal.
You might vomit foam when you have a stomach bug, eat too many fatty or acidic foods, drink too much alcohol, or take certain types of medication. But it can also be a symptom of health conditions like hiatal hernia and candidiasis.
If you notice the following hairball symptoms, be sure to contact your veterinarian, as they could indicate that a hairball has caused a potentially life-threatening blockage: Ongoing vomiting, gagging, retching, or hacking without producing a hairball. Lack of appetite. Lethargy.
If your cat is vomiting clear liquid several times and/or in conjunction with other symptoms such as lack of appetite, weight loss, lethargy, or diarrhea, you should make an appointment with your vet right away.
Cats who are hacking without producing any material may mistakenly be thought to have hairballs, but could actually have a cough and underlying respiratory disease, like feline asthma. Families should seek veterinary care if their cat is experiencing unproductive hacking.
If your cat is gagging and doesn`t seem to be spitting up any hairballs, you should check her airways for ingested foreign objects. If you do see something, don`t try to remove it on your own, but instead contact the emergency vet. You may do more harm than good by trying to remove an ingested foreign object.
Dark vomit often comes from bleeding in the stomach. It can be from several causes: A gastric ulcer or gastritis. Inflammation of the stomach lining from things like nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs like Advil), infections, and smoking.
Throwing up mucus and clear liquid

If your vomit is clear, it`s typically the indication that other than secretions, there`s nothing left in your stomach to throw up. It could also indicate that you`ve recently had a large amount of water.

Add a hairball gel or paste to your cat`s food, or put a dollop on their paws. They will lick enough to lubricate their digestion system, allowing the hairball to pass. Petroleum jelly is another choice and also works as a mild laxative. You may need to give more than one application before they work.
The result is a cat vomiting up a regurgitated hairball. It can take a feline around 48 hours of regular gagging and retching to expel a hairball. Cats sometimes eat grass to make themselves vomit when they have a hairball, or show signs of constipation and lethargy.
A hairball (fur ball) is the unpleasant looking cigar-shaped wad of fur your cat might vomit up. It gets the tubular shape when hair gathers in your cat`s esophagus. If the hair reaches the stomach, but doesn`t leave the stomach, the material that is vomited may be more round in shape.
If a blockage is detected, surgery may be required in order to remove the hairball. More often, however, therapy will center on protecting the intestines through several days of clinical care that includes the use of a laxative to move the hairball through the digestive tract.
So how do you spot an intestinal blockage in your cat? Common symptoms include diarrhea, vomiting, refusing to eat, weakness and lethargy, abdominal pain or swelling, cold body temperature, crying and even an unwillingness to lie down, among other issues.
A hairball every now and then (often with foamy or yellow liquid) may not be a reason to call your vet, but if your cat starts vomiting frequently or the hairballs are large and seem to be causing your pet discomfort, you may want to have your feline friend in for a checkup.
Sometimes cats cough because they`re hacking up a hairball. But if no hairball is produced, there`s likely a more serious issue at play. Dry, wheezing coughs are often a sign of feline asthma, especially if the cough consistently occurs multiple times a week.
According to research, hairballs are a common cause of gagging in cats. Because cats groom themselves, hairballs may form and may go down your cat`s throat and stomach. And since it`s not a natural food for cats, they aren`t digested in the stomach, so they want to expel it by way of gagging.
Your Cat Is Coughing With No Hairball

If your cat is coughing but no hairball is produced, it is important to pay attention to other symptoms your cat is showing. Infrequent, but regular coughing (a few times a week or consistently every few weeks) can be a sign of asthma.

This usually involves slowly syringing a weak, 3% solution of hydrogen peroxide into the cat`s mouth. This is often the most successful way of inducing emesis.
Gastritis tends to affect the lining of the stomach, whereas gastroenteritis affects the intestines. Gastritis is inflammation, or irritation, of the stomach lining. Gastroenteritis, on the other hand, is inflammation of the intestine, or the stomach and the bowel.
Red flags include: Stomach discomfort that occurs after taking over-the-counter or prescription medications. Vomiting of blood. The presence of blood in stools (faeces)
It`s going to look like water. Vomiting clear liquid like this is a common result. Don`t panic. You will likely have green/yellow vomit soon, see above.
Dry heaving is retching or going through the motions and sensation of vomiting without producing any vomit. Sucking on ice, eating a small amount of food, and resting with the head propped up are some ways to relieve it. Dry heaves are extremely common and often occur after periods of vomiting.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. Our cat appears to be trying to throw up a hairball but only a foamy mucus comes out, she has been sneezing & while throwing up her stomach twitches.
ANSWER : A. Vomiting up mucus or bile without anything else can sometimes indicate digestive upset or acid reflux rather than a hairball. It may be a good idea to feed meals more often or to offer a bland diet of boiled chicken to see if that helps. If a hairball is present but unable to be brought up, it may be causing a blockage in the digestive tract, and she may vomit up any food she attempts to eat. If she continues to attempt to vomit, the symptoms continue for more than a day or so, or if she appears in great distress/very ill then scheduling a veterinary appointment is best to check for other causes of illness that are causing her symptoms.

If the cause is hairballs, switching to a hairball diet, adding a hairball paste to her food and brushing her more often can all help reduce the amount of hair ingested and help break down hair ingested in the body.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. We have a 4 yr old lab-pit mix we raise from 6 weeks.If my husband tries to take hin by the collar and make him go out to pottie he growls.Problem?
ANSWER : A. This is not good behavior. Rather than take him by the collar, call him to come with you. If he’s not good about coming when called, you can work on that. Keeps treats on hand to to entice him out and reward him when he does go potty and he’ll come to look forward to it. Clicker training is another great way to teach a dog all kinds of things, from obedience to tricks.

Have treats on hand that you know he loves, then simply click and treat. He will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so he has to come to you. Call and click and when he comes to you for that treat, treat him and give him lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When he comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if he doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If he takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until he comes eagerly. Next, try him off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point he should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If he does not, go back to the last step he performed reliably and work on that again until he responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating him every time, but still praise him. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until he comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time he is overly excited so that he can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something he already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Limping in Dogs

Q. My puppy will be 8 weeks old tomorrow. I’ve had her for a week now, and she still isn’t responding to any training or her name. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. Try clicker training her to come when called. Clicker training is an effective way of training you dog to not only come when called, but can be used to teach a variety of tricks and tasks.

Have treats on hand that you know she loves, then simply click and treat. She will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so she has to come to you. Call and click and when she comes to you for that treat, treat him and give her lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When she comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if she doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If she takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until she comes eagerly. Next, try her off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point she should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If she does not, go back to the last step she performed reliably and work on that again until she responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating her every time, but still praise her. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until she comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time she is overly excited so that she can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something she already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Q. How should I interpret my cat’s tail movements?
ANSWER : A. Our feline friends express themselves in many different ways, including through the use of their tails. Most pet owners pay close attention to a happy or excited dog, but they are sometimes less attentive to the posture and movement of their cat. Here are some of the most common cat tail behaviors, and the underlying emotion behind each action:

A flicking tail: Many anxious, nervous or stressed cats will hold their tail in a low position and flick it quickly back and forth. This is often referred to as angry tail, and a pet owner or veterinarian should be on guard for any possible aggressive or defensive activity. If a cat is moving their tail slowly, and not exhibiting the flicking motion, then this cat is at a much calmer state.

Vertical position: Most of the time when a cat is holding their tail in a straight, vertical position this is indicating curiosity and a playful mood. A cat chasing after a laser pointer or playing toys will often have their tails in a vertical position showing their enjoyment. This position also helps with balanced movements. In contrast, if the tail is in the vertical position and the cat’s back is arched with pinned back ears then this could demonstrate a feeling of being threatened and thus result in defensive or aggressive behaviors.

The Tucked Tail: Similar to a dog, a tucked tail often indicates submission or fear. Your cat is conveying upset feelings and should most likely be left alone. This tucked tail appearance can also make a cat look smaller and less threatening to an aggressive cat.

The Tail Twine: Cats will often hook their tail around another cat’s tail, owner’s legs or other objects to show a friendly and affectionate nature. They are also trying to indicate whether they want to receive affection from their owners, be fed or have playtime.

The next time you are home with your feline companion take note on how they express themselves through their tail movements, their ears, body posture and vocalization. You can start to better understand their needs and wants, in addition to what makes them uncomfortable or happy. Cats will surprise you with their array of emotions and varied expressions they can express.

Q. I just adopted my cat, about 7 months old, and he has discharged, a greenish color, coming from his eyes. Was told it was stress but what else?
ANSWER : A. I would call the rescue and explain your concerns. I wouldn’t think green mucus coming from eyes means stress and maybe whoever told you that was trying to just brush off the symptoms has nothing to worry about. Rescues normally guarantee the health of their animals and should cover the cost of medical bills if you need to take the cat into the vet. Green color can mean infection. Is the cat sneezing? Could it be an upper respiratory infection? Try to explain to the rescue they need to take the animal into the vet. If they aren’t interested in helping please take the cat to the vet as soon as you can. Make sure to bring all records you have on the cat incase the doctor’s office see’s any mistakes or missing fecal tests/vaccinations they would like to do at a later date with the cat (If the cat is sick they would never give vaccinations the same day).

Read Full Q/A … : Eye Problems in Cats

Q. My cats nose is stopped up on antibiotics. She has a loss of appetite, acting normal though. Is 3 ounces of can food enough in 24h? 9 pound cat
ANSWER : A. Cats with stopped up noses tend to eat much less, as you’ve noted, because they can’t smell their food as well. And the smell of food is pretty important to a cat’s appetite. You can start by warming up the food in a microwave – not too hot, test it yourself by putting your finger right in the center, as the temperature of microwave food can vary – as this will intensify the smell and hopefully make your cat more interested.

Saline nose drops, like those that are used on little kids, are safe to use on a cat to clean the discharge that is dried around and in the nose. There’s a brand called Little Noses that’s available in the U.S. That I like. You can put it on a q-tip and try to remove the debris. Humidifying the air with a humidifier can help as well, or you can put the cat in the bathroom and run the shower enough to generate steam. Don’t use “real” nose drops like Neo-synephrine or anything else like that – cats quickly build up resistance to them.

A 3 oz can of food is an OK amount in 24 hours, but do try the techniques above to help your cat get more interested in food. You might also try some baby food – no garlic or onions in the ingredients – as cats usually really like the taste of it.