h? JoAnn

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You should follow the instructions on the label. Every food can have different kcal per 100g. You can start with amount written on the wrapping and then adjust it to your animal individual needs.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Kittens 7 weeks and older should eat mainly dry kibble. Weeks 5 and 6 are transition weeks where the two foods (what they were eating and what they will be eating) should be mixed together so their tummies do not get upset by the change in diet.
Regular, routine feeding times allow your cat`s body to be prepared for the food it will receive. It is not recommended to keep the bowl filled and allow grazing. A break in eating habits can be a warning sign of illness. When cats eat on a regular schedule, that habit becomes strong.
From six months, your kitten`s growth rate will slow down, meaning their nutritional requirements change. The number of meals per day can be decreased to two to four. Feed your kitten three pouches of kitten wet food per day or in a mixed diet, only two pouches and twenty to twenty-five grams of kitten dry food.
Kittens should be fed kitten food — both wet and dry — until they are at least eight months old, and then they can move to adult food. Always have plenty of fresh water, changing it at least once a day.
On average, cats need 50 ml water per kg of body weight. This amounts to 25 ml for a 500-gram kitten. Since water makes up a larger portion of a kitten`s body than that of an adult cat, it is extra important to make sure they drink enough. You can help make sure your kitten gets enough water by feeding it wet food.
Age Makes a Difference

“From age six months to maturity, most cats will do well when fed two times a day.” Once the cat becomes an adult, at about one year, feeding once or twice a day is appropriate in most cases. Senior cats, age seven and above, should maintain the same feeding regimen.

Cats naturally eat multiple small meals throughout the day. At a minimum, offer food to 4-6-month-old kittens three times daily. By 10 months of age, two meals per day is the minimum. However, up to six small meals is even better!
Grazing or free feeding is a term, which refers to allowing your cat access to dry food all day, everyday – can severely impact the longevity of their lives. It increases the risk of many health issues such as urinary tract issues, obesity, diabetes, kidney disease, and physiological issues.
You can safely leave dry cat food out for several days and it won`t spoil, but it`s best to throw out leftovers and wash the dish on a daily basis, to keep Fluffy`s food at its freshest. Keep in mind that dry food will grow stale within a day and may not be as appealing to your cat once this happens.
Dry food allows the kitten to eat whenever they want, but wet food should be given separately in small, regular portions. Feeding dry food alone or feeding both wet and dry foods are both perfectly acceptable, but feeding wet alone may make it difficult for your kitten to get sufficient nutrients in the day.
There are plenty of reasons why you may need your cat to eat dry food. Fortunately, it is possible to make wet food out of your cat`s dry food if the need arises. To do this, there are several methods that you can use that all include adding one part water to three or four parts food and letting the food soak in it.
What type of food does my kitten need, wet or dry? It`s important that very young kittens have at least some canned food to eat as part of their diet. Very small kittens have very small teeth and can`t chew dry food well. Without some canned food, they won`t get enough nutrition to grow properly.
Yes, cats can eat rice in small amounts. It`s non-toxic, so it won`t harm them to have a bit in their food, but you shouldn`t give too much as it`s not an essential part of their diet.
The basic rule of thumb is that the average-sized cat will gain about 1 pound a month, so at six months of age, your kitten should weigh about 6 pounds with a lanky torso and legs. It may seem a little disproportionate, but your kitten will soon grow into its long legs and body just like a human preteen does.
A reason for this may be due to their diet. If a kitten is fed with dry food they are more likely to be thirsty. If so, adding more wet food to your kitten`s diet may help. Also, since kittens are very active you may find that they drink more after a play session which is just normal.
Here`s a good guide to how much water a cat should drink each day: Kitten up to three months (1.4kg) – 70ml. Six-month-old kitten (2.7kg) – 135ml. Medium cat (4kg) – 200ml.
Young kittens have very small stomachs and are best started on 4 small meals a day – if that`s not possible, leave out some dry food so they can nibble. At 4 months old, this can be dropped to 3 meals daily. At 6 months old, this can be dropped to 2 meals daily.
Cats can survive for about two weeks without eating but only three days without drinking. The longer your cat goes without proper nutrition, however, the weaker they become, so it`s important to contact your vet if you suspect they haven`t eaten in a day or more.
Your kitten is growing so she needs to eat a lot to meet her daily nutritional requirements. These nutrients in the kitten`s food provide her with the energy and raw materials she needs to build tissues and grow. An energetic and active kitten will need more food and will have the tendency to eat more.
Young cats and kittens that were not raised with littermates, or that lack opportunities to play most commonly show play aggression. Learning appropriate play is an important part of a cat`s socialization, and this normally occurs during time spent with littermates.
In many cases, over-excitement at feeding time and an inability to leave their food bowl with even a scrap inside could be a sign of an underlying medical problem. Parasite infestations, diabetes, and thyroid conditions can all cause an animal to act like they are ravenous all the time.
As kittens mature beyond the newborn stage, they will sleep less; but even at six months of age they still manage to spend about 16 to 20 hours a day dozing and dreaming away.
As a general average, if you are feeding a commercially produced high-quality dry food with a good quality protein source, then an indoor cat would be fed about 1/3 to 1/2 cup of food per day. This amount of quality food is approximately between 167–250 calories.
Felines tend to have strong opinions on which foods they like or don`t like. Often, this means they`ll prefer dry food over wet, or vice versa. They may even have a preference on pate versus meat in gravy, size or texture of kibbles, or another very specific factor.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. How much dry kitten food should my 16 week old kitten be eating?
ANSWER : A. It would actually be better to feed your kitten canned food, as dry food has a lot of carbohydrates. Cats are obligatory carnivores, and not carb-eaters. In order to give you an amount to feed for dry food I would need to know which food you are feeding as they are all different. I suggest you check on the cat food bag. If the bag does not give you an amount, I would not trust it to be a complete food. You should then get a food from a reputable company such as Hill’s Science diet, or similar. As for wet food feed three times daily around 2oz each time, best to feed the pate style food.

Q. My 20 month Cavalier doesn’t eat unless I let him eat from my finger, then he eats. Sometimes he will only eat once a day and leave his food.
ANSWER : A. It is possible that your dog is just not satisfied with his current food, or may be a picky eater. There are several things you can try to encourage your dog to eat.

The first step is to remove any additional treats or people food that may be more enticing to your dog than his own meal. If you feel you must give him some form of treat, be sure to place them directly in his food bowl and mixed with his regular diet. This allows him to get some snacks while also “forcing” him to try out his current meal to get the reward.

Enticing your dog to try his food by adding a pet-safe gravy or even a few treats of plain boiled chicken mixed in can help. Be sure to mix the foods thoroughly so he must explore his own food before getting the treat.

Some small breed dogs may also have a hard time with certain bowls and their collars. If there is a metal name tag on the collar and a metal bowl, the clinking sound can sometimes scare off dogs and make them not want to eat from their bowl. Using a bowl of a different material, or removing the collar prior to a meal may help with this issue.

Your dog may also just not be into his current food and may like another variety better. You can try a new variety by gradually switching over a period of 7-9 days, slowly adding in more new food and removing old until it is switched. This change may encourage him to try out meals again, and the slow changeover will allow his body to adjust to the new diet without digestive upset.

Q. My cat will not eat the renal food my veterinarian recommended, can I feed a grocery store food?
ANSWER : A. Your veterinarian recommended a therapeutic kidney diet because it has ingredients that will help slow the progression of your cat’s conditions, especially phosphorus and lower protein levels. Many of the non-prescription or grocery store foods generally have high levels of phosphorus and would not be ideal for your cat.

To help your cat accept the new food It is important to do a transition. There are two reasons to do a transition:

1) Occasionally a pet will have a GI upset when switched to a new diet,

2) A pet will accept a new food better when a transition is done to allow the pet to get use to the new texture and flavor.

There is more of a chance with a hydrolyzed protein or different (high or low) fiber level food to cause a GI upset. Transition recommendation:

1) Recommend ¾ old diet – ¼ new diet

2) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

3) ½ old diet – ½ new diet

4) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

5) ¼ old diet – ¾ new diet

6) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

7) End with 100% of the new food.

Sometimes a transition should be longer, especially for cats. Use the same recommendation, but instead of a few days, recommend doing each step for a week or more. If you cat is still not interested in the new diet you can research other non-prescription diets focusing on the labels for appropriate levels of phosphorus and protein.

Also, home cooking may be an option but make sure to provide adequate nutrients. A good website to consult is balanceit.com. This website helps you to create well balanced home cooked recipes and offers supplements to add into the diet.

Q. Hi I have two cats that are a year old. I constantly have dry food in their bowl, but how many sachets of wet food should I give them?
ANSWER : A. They do not require wet food if they have sufficient, complete formula dry food; most cats will self regulate their intake of dry food. You can use sachets as a treat or regular meal but it will be important to monitor their body weight and make sure they are not becoming overweight with the addition to ad lib dry food; you may have to restrict their dry food if this is the case. Every brand is different in its feeding recommendations also so it is impossible to advise about ‘how much food’. Your vet tech can recommend if they need to gain or indeed lose weight and can advise in relation to specific brands for your cats

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. Our kitten is 6 months old, we let her graze on her dry food. We put a cup in her bowl and by the end of the day, it is gone. Is that to much? JoAnn
ANSWER : A. You should follow the instructions on the label. Every food can have different kcal per 100g. You can start with amount written on the wrapping and then adjust it to your animal individual needs.

Q. How much should I feed my cat?
ANSWER : A. How much a cat should eat depends on many variables including his activity level, metabolic rate and the food you are offering. Use the feeding guide on the cat food label as a starting point. These instructions usually read something like, “for cats weighing 5 lbs, feed between 1/2 and 3/4 cup per day; for cat’s weighing 10 lbs, feed between 3/4 and 1 cup per day; and for cats weighing 15 lbs, feed between 1 cup and 1 1/2 cups per day”.

Use your cat’s body condition to fine tune the amount you offer. For example, if he is overweight offer an amount on the low end of the recommended range and reevaluate in a few weeks to a month. Your veterinarian can also help you determine how much of a particular food you should be offering.

Q. My 3 month old puppy has had diarrhea, liquid form. This is the second day. What should I do? I recently changed his food as well.
ANSWER : A. Is he vomiting or lethargic? Food should always be introduced slowly over 7-10 days as that can cause diarrhea, if there are any other symptoms then contact you vet. Try introducing 3/4 of old food with 1/4 of new food for a few days & then half & half for a few days followed by 3/4 of new food with 1/4 old food for a few days before completely changing onto new diet.