ch worse?

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Place an e-collar (cone) on him to prevent excessive licking and chewing. Some antihistamines work better than others in different dogs, so you will need to find the one that works best. . Consider adding an essential fatty acid supplement (usually a fish oil) to his diet to promote healthy skin. EFAs may also decrease inflammation. Search www.pet360.com for fish oil supplements. Try to determine what the underlying cause is and decrease or eliminate it. Discuss food elimination trials and allergy testing with your vet.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

In fact, Benadryl is a fantastic medication to treat dogs with mild-to-moderate allergies. It`s most commonly used to treat skin allergies, but it can help aid with anything from seasonal allergies to environmental allergies to food allergies to an allergic reaction to a snake or insect bite.
Skin conditions in dogs and cats can be caused by nutritional deficiency or due to adverse reactions to food. The most common deficiencies are to zinc, vitamin A and polyunsaturated acids. Adverse reactions may be due to toxins within the diet or due to immunological or allergic reactions to the food.
These factors include fleas, staph (bacteria) or yeast (fungal) infections, and food allergies. If you`re noticing an increase in your dog`s scratching, they may have developed one or more of these flare factors that are pushing them over their “itch threshold” despite being on anti-itch medication.
For most dogs, the appropriate dosage of Benadryl is perfectly safe. It will begin to reduce symptoms like skin rashes in about an hour. Getting the dosage right is important because most Benadryl tablets are intended for humans. Some dogs can be quite small, so they need less Benadryl than a person.
You can use over-the-counter antihistamines for your dog`s allergies. They can be really quite helpful in some dogs, but they`re really unlikely to control an acute or severe flare up.
The active ingredient in BENADRYL® is an antihistamine called diphenhydramine HCl. Antihistamines are used for relief from symptoms related to hay fever, upper respiratory allergy, or cold symptoms. Antihistamines are a class of drugs that block histamine from binding to H1 receptors in the body.
Add an omega 3 supplement

Feed your pet a multivitamin with Omega 3 fatty acids, which may help restore your pet`s skin health and reduce hair loss. We`ll contact your Vet to verify.

Itchy skin and hair loss are two of the biggest indicators that your dog has an allergy. They could be allergic to certain ingredients in their food or environmental factors like pollen or dust mites. Your vet can conduct tests to determine whether your dog has food or environmental allergies.
Benadryl is a great medication for use in dogs with mild-to-moderate allergies. Seasonal allergies, food allergies, environmental allergies, and allergic reactions to snake and insect bites all respond to Benadryl in most cases.
Your veterinarian might recommend immunomodulatory medications. These are available either as a daily pill (Apoquel) or an injection given every 4-10 weeks (Cytopoint). Along with these, antibiotics or antifungal medicines are often required to treat the skin infections that result from allergies.
Apple Cider Vinegar For Dog Skin Allergies

ACV can help relieve itchy skin and rashes caused by yeast and poison ivy. The best way to apply it is by making a 50/50 solution of apple cider vinegar and water in a spray bottle. Apply it directly onto itchy spots. Caution: Do NOT put it on open wounds.

Cetirizine (Zyrtec) works well for allergies and usually causes less side effects like sleepiness than some other antihistamines such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl).
“Taking higher than recommended doses of the common over-the-counter (OTC) allergy medicine diphenhydramine (Benadryl) can lead to serious heart problems, seizures, coma or even death,” said the FDA in the warning.
Among the most common causes for compulsive dog licking, chewing, or scratching behaviors are fleas, ticks, and mites. Although ticks are often visible to the naked eye, fleas often go unseen until there is a large infestation, and mites are microscopic.
Chewing is a perfectly normal behavior for dogs of all ages. Both wild and domestic dogs spend hours chewing bones. This activity keeps their jaws strong and their teeth clean. Dogs love to chew on bones, sticks and just about anything else available.
Omega-3 fatty acids help moisturize your dog`s skin, which in turn may help reduce shedding, prevent dandruff and lessen itchiness.
Some owners dab a little apple cider vinegar onto their dog`s coat with a sponge or even drizzle a cup or two into a warm bath where the pet can soak. The antibacterial properties of apple cider vinegar can support healthy skin, hair follicles, and coat, and help your pet avoid infections that may cause hair loss.
Vitamin Deficiencies That Cause Hair Loss

Biotin: Dogs with this vitamin H deficiency have a dull coat, flaky skin, and hair loss. In one study, 60% of the dogs given a high dose of biotin (5 mg/10 kg/day) improved when given this vitamin even though they did not all have biotin deficiency.

Sugar-Free Plain Yogurt. Feeding your itchy dog plain, unsweetened yogurt may offer many health benefits. Some yeast infections and skin irritation can stem from your dog`s digestive system. This remedy is good for dogs who have certain types of rashes, hives, or allergies.
Balanced Breed Probiotics Dogs Itchy Skin

Studies have shown that probiotics can also reduce inflammation and help alleviate allergic reactions in dogs with allergies. By supporting your dog`s immune system from within, probiotics can help promote a healthy, itch-free coat.

Quercetin is a bioflavonoid that provides natural allergy relief for dogs reducing symptoms like itching, scratching, licking and chewing. Many veterinarians suggest quercetin because it is a safe, natural antihistamine for dogs. In fact, quercetin is often referred to as “Nature`s Benadryl”.
Prescription antihistamines taken as a nasal spray include azelastine (Astelin, Astepro) and olopatadine (Patanase). Over-the-counter (OTC) antihistamine tablets include fexofenadine (Allegra Allergy), loratadine (Claritin, Alavert) and cetirizine (Zyrtec Allergy); OTC antihistamine syrups are available for children.
Unfortunately, figuring out what`s causing scratching can take time, but there are some at-home remedies — olive oil, coconut oil, and fish oil — that may provide some relief by helping to moisturize your dog`s dry, dandruffy skin.
Oral antihistamines are another commonly prescribed medication for dogs diagnosed with a mild case of dermatitis. An antibiotic or antifungal medication might also be prescribed if a secondary infection is suspected. Yeast infections are also common. Immunotherapy is also another option available for dogs.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Our lab has had a huge issue with chewing,itching and losing hair on his lower extremities . He is taking Benedryl. Can Benedryl make his itch worse?
ANSWER : A. Place an e-collar (cone) on him to prevent excessive licking and chewing. Some antihistamines work better than others in different dogs, so you will need to find the one that works best. . Consider adding an essential fatty acid supplement (usually a fish oil) to his diet to promote healthy skin. EFAs may also decrease inflammation. Search www.pet360.com for fish oil supplements. Try to determine what the underlying cause is and decrease or eliminate it. Discuss food elimination trials and allergy testing with your vet.

Q. Russian blue mix cat – usually velvet soft coat but hair on back hind qtrs. is thinning, remaining hair seems less velvety than normal
ANSWER : A. Changes in coat appearance can be caused by a number of things. In older cats, hair loss or changes in coat and skin confirmation may indicate a metabolic issue such as thyroid problems. Cats can begin to lose hair and may also show other changes such as weight changes or appetite changes. Blood work is usually done to check for this, and most pets do very well with a daily medication treatment.

Hair loss can also be caused by mites on the skin, external parasites or even skin and fungal infections. These may cause red bumps or sores to appear on the skin in addition to the hair loss and coat changes. Your vet can take a skin scraping of the area to check for mites and infections, and a preventive flea treatment can remove any external parasites. If an infection or mites are present, your vet can also prescribe an antibiotic or topical cream to treat.

After any treatment it may take a month or two for completely bald patches to grow back in. This is normal as the skin and follicles need some time to heal prior to beginning the hair growth cycle again.

Q. My puppy has a hard time staying by herself, she cries and chews her crate. How can I make her more comfortable being alone?
ANSWER : A. Crate training is an extremely slow process, so you should be taking baby steps:

First, lure her into the crate with high value treats and close the crate door, then toss several treats inside the crate. During this process do not make eye contact, speak to, or hand-feed her. Toss in more treats and stand up. Then, toss in some more treats and take one step away. Return to the crate, toss more and take a few steps away. Return, toss treats, take 5 steps away. Return, toss treats, take 3 steps away. The key is to randomly change up the length of time you are gone, slowly adding and subtracting seconds. Slowly work your way out of sight. Then, quickly return, and walk out of sight but stay out of sight a few seconds. Return, toss treats, walk out of sight a few more seconds, etc. Take it slowly.

Finally, when you let her out ignore her, don’t make a big deal of it.

Read Full Q/A … : If Your Dog Hates His Crate

Q. My dog is losing her hair and she is a pomodoodle 2years old she had a litter of pups around last thanksgivibg could this be why she’s losing her hair
ANSWER : A. I would be interested to know where she is losing her hair. Is she itching or just hair loss? Hair loss on the flank and abdomen could indicate a metabolic issue, base of the tail a flea allergy, face could be demodex. I think we should consult about it so I can ask you some questions and you can send images.

Read Full Q/A … : R

Q. Our cat of six years has on two separate occasions has defecated on the living room rug and recently pee’d on the skirt of the Christmas tree.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.

Q. Inherited picanese(?) Dog has sores on his lower back and is constantly itching, he’s not losing hair yet. Don’t think it is mange,but not sure.
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. My pet is losing hair I have taken him to vet to be seen. Prescribed antibiotics and antihistamine one month later still losing hair what should I do?
ANSWER : A. I recommend you get an in depth skin examination or referral to a dermatologist if he is not responding to treatment. Skin infections from bacteria or yeast can be treated with medicated shampoos and parasites such as mites require specific treatments depending on type and location of problem. Allergies and adverse food reactions can also cause prolonged itching in apparently ‘healthy’ skin; a hydrolyzed diet trial for 8 weeks (no treats, flavored tablets etc only water and specific diet) will investigate the impact of food triggers in his itching. Some severe allergies require long term medical management prescribed by your vet in order to manage the itch-scratch cycle and prevent trauma to the skin