Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It is unlikely to be related. If the eyes are uncomfortable or continue to be red in the morning then it could be an infection. This would need to be examined by your vet and the correct treatment prescribed.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Ruptured blood vessels beneath the conjunctiva may be the result of trauma, a blood disorder, or certain infectious diseases. This condition, by itself, does not require therapy, but close inspection is necessary to determine if more serious changes within the eye have occurred.
Allergies are by far the most common cause of eye redness in dogs. If your dog`s eye appears red and you see other clinical signs such as sneezing, runny nose, or watery eyes, then allergies are one potential culprit. Some dogs have seasonal allergies, and some have allergies that last all year long.
The most common complications to expect after neutering or spaying are related to self-trauma, when pets inflict damage with their tongues or potentially with their paws. Infection or dehiscence of the incision are typical consequences. Here are a few strategies to help avoid these complications: Keep that cone on!
This is not a painful condition; however, overtime the gland can become inflamed due to exposure and dryness. With increased inflammation the gland can even bleed.
“Cherry eye” is a common term for prolapse (or popping out) of the third eyelid gland. Many mammals, including dogs, have a third eyelid located inside the lower eyelid, also called the nictitating membrane. The third eyelid serves as an additional protective layer for the eye, especially during hunting or fighting.
A broken blood vessel in the eye may look alarming, but it`s usually harmless. A subconjunctival hemorrhage often occurs without any obvious harm to your eye. Even a strong sneeze or cough can cause a blood vessel to break in the eye. You don`t need to treat it.
Treatment. You may want to use eye drops, such as artificial tears, to soothe any scratchy feeling you may be experiencing. Beyond that, the blood will absorb within about 1 to 2 weeks, and you`ll need no treatment.
You should be able to place two fingers between the dog`s neck and the bandage. Internal Bleeding. It is not possible to stop this type of bleeding without veterinary intervention. Signs of internal bleeding may include pale gums, shallow or labored breathing, or weakness.
After Spay Surgery

Sometimes, a pet who is spayed can return home the same day. Other times, she may need to spend the night under veterinary supervision. Pain medication can be given to your pet if she needs it, but most don`t. Your pet may be nauseous following the procedure and not want to eat for a day or two.

No walks for 48 hours post-op and gentle, short walks on the lead from then on. At the post-op check-up, ask your vet for advice about when they think it is safe for your dog to go on longer walks. In summary, your veterinary surgeon is the expert.
“The telltale sign of cherry eye or prolapse of the tear gland of the third eyelid is a fleshy pink swelling at the corner of the eye,” she explains. This bulge is typically in the corner nearest the nose and similar in shape and color to a cherry pit, hence the nickname. The condition can occur in one or both eyes.
Immediately post surgery, the third eyelid still looks inflamed and red, but the third eyelid is no longer inverted or `flipped-over` like it was. Once the gland is in the normal position, the swelling will slowly reduce over a period of usually two weeks. The eyes should be fully open and relatively comfortable.
Will Cherry Eye Go Away on Its Own or Without Treatment? No. Surgery is almost always necessary. However, in certain cases and when caught early, your veterinarian may prescribe a treatment plan first targeting the inflammation.
A subconjunctival hemorrhage (sub-con-JUNK-tih-vul HEM-er-ij) is a red spot on the white of the eye. It can look scary, but it`s usually harmless, doesn`t hurt, and won`t affect vision. Most subconjunctival hemorrhages go away without treatment in a few days or weeks.
A red spot on the eye is a relatively common finding that`s not usually a cause for concern. In fact, a subconjunctival hemorrhage —the most common cause—typically doesn`t require any treatment. However, a red spot on the eye may be caused by a more serious condition, such as sickle cell disease or cancer.
While a visit to the vet is the safest bet, many natural remedies can help soothe and heal your furry friend`s eyes. Home remedies for eye infections in dogs may include the use of chamomile tea bags, diluted apple cider vinegar, colloidal silver, and coconut oil.
It is not recommended to use over-the-counter (OTC) eye drops for humans on dogs without approval from a veterinarian. Dogs will not respond to most human eye drops well. Popular eyedrops for itchiness and redness often contain an ingredient called Tetrahydrozoline hydrochloride, which narrows blood vessels in the eye.
The most common cause of the whites of the eyes taking on a brownish and sometimes blotchy color in African-Americans is melanin pigment in the surface tissue of the eye, known as the sclera and conjunctiva. This is benign and there is no treatment safe enough to use for such a benign condition.
Bleeding into the skin happens when small blood vessels burst just below your skin`s surface. These broken blood vessels may look like small red dots. Or they may be larger purple, blue or black patches. Usually, bleeding into the skin is minor and heals in about two weeks.
Vets can also take pictures, such as radiography of the chest or ultrasonography of the abdomen (looking for free fluid sloshing around in there), to find out more information. Or place a needle into the abdominal cavity or chest to detect a build-up of free blood.
As a result of the active bleeding a patient can become quickly anaemic, requiring a blood transfusion prior, during or after the surgery. Surgery is considered an emergency procedure for a bleeding pet and the removal of the spleen (splenectomy) is often the preferred option.
Look for Life-Threatening Bleeding

Examples include: Blood that is spurting out of the wound. Blood that won`t stop coming out of the wound.

Internal bleeding occurs when blood leaks out through a damaged blood vessel or organ. External bleeding happens when blood exits through a break in the skin. Blood loss from bleeding tissue can also be apparent when blood exits through a natural opening in the body, such as the: mouth.
Internal bleeding may be much more difficult to identify. It may not be evident for many hours after it begins, and symptoms may only occur when there is significant blood loss or if a blood clot is large enough to compress an organ and prevent it from functioning properly.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. Our puppy was spayed on Friday and now both the whites of her eyes are red, like a blood vessel broke, is this common
ANSWER : A. It is unlikely to be related. If the eyes are uncomfortable or continue to be red in the morning then it could be an infection. This would need to be examined by your vet and the correct treatment prescribed.

Q. Yellow lab F, approx 9-10 yrs. Sudden onset of extreme redness in one eye, now seems to have spread to other over 24-48 hrs. Healty, active, good app.
ANSWER : A. This could be a bacterial conjunctivitis. Dogs can pass these infections around, just like people can. The fact that it started in one eye and moved to the other suggests infection, but I can’t rule out something more serious like glaucoma. I feel like anytime a dog’s eye gets acutely red like this it’s cause for alarm, and needs to be checked out as soon as possible. Like I said above, it’s likely a simple eye infection, but get it checked out to be sure.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. One eye is more red than the other. Last night he was pawing at it,today, he isn’t. Should I bring him to the vet?
ANSWER : A. Sounds possible that he had some irritation to the eye that is at least not itchy anymore. You can do either, having it checked now to confirm mild irritation, potentially due to debris or a topical irritant to the eye; or you can flush the eye with sterile saline eye wash (over the counter) using care not to poke or prod the eye and see if the irritation goes away on its own within the next 24 hrs. It has shown improvement already it appears, however if it is not cleared up and your pet seems irritated by it AT ALL, then it should be looked at by a vet and tested for a possible corneal scratch or ulcer. These can cause redness of the eye, eye discharge and pawing at the face. They are usually treated by prescription only topical eye antibiotic ointment and generally do very well after treatment.

Read Full Q/A … : Eye Problems in Cats

Q. My puppy is urinating a lot. And the lady I gave one of the puppies to said she thinks her puppy has diabetes could my puppy have it to
ANSWER : A. It is not likely that either one of these puppies has diabetes. It is very uncommon for a puppy that young to have diabetes. If your puppy is straining to urinate or is urinating very small amounts frequently and cannot seem to wait for very long between urination, he may have a urinary tract infection. It is quite possible that your puppy is completely normal. I would suggest an exam with your veterinarian and discuss the behavior with them. They may suggest a urinalysis. Your puppy should be going to the vet at 3 week intervals for vaccinations at this age, so you can discuss it when he has his next set of vaccines. The other person with the other puppy should also be taking hers to a vet for proper immunizations and she should also discuss her concerns with her vet.

Q. Weak, discharge from eyes, swelling on right eye, does not want to open eyes. What is wrong?
ANSWER : A. If the discharge from the eye is green or yellow in color, it can indicate a secondary infection. Swollen eyes can be caused by a number of things ranging from allergies to infections, to injury to the eye itself or surrounding areas.

It is best to have your pet’s eye examined by your local vet. They will most likely wish to place a stain in the eye that can check for damage such as cuts or scratches. An ointment can then be given to help reduce inflammation, pain and take care of infection.

Until you can get to the vet, be sure to not let your pet scratch or paw at their eye as this can make things worse. You can also use a warm wet washcloth to gently remove any debris and allow the eye to open some, providing relief. However, if symptoms worsen, or the swelling travels to the face, head or neck, it may indicate a serious allergic reaction which should be treated immediately.

Q. I was told by my vet that my dogs cherry eye was caused by something hitting his eye when he was poking around under a bush. I was told surgery needed
ANSWER : A. Prolapsed gland of the eyelid refers to a pink mass protruding from the animal’s eyelid; it is also called a “cherry eye.” Normally, the gland is anchored by an attachment made up of fibrous material. The most common sign of “cherry eye” is an oval mass protruding from the dogs’s third eyelid. It can occur in one or both eyes, and may be accompanied by swelling and irritation. He may have acquired it by getting an injury to his eye but this isn’t the case sometimes. Sometimes there is a weakness in the fibrous attachment.

The veterinarian will review the mass in the dog’s third eyelid and determine if there is an underlying cause for the condition. The diagnosis of the prolapsed gland could be scrolled or everted cartilage in the third eyelid, abnormal cells in the third eye, or a prolapse of fat in the dog’s eye.

Treatment often includes surgical replacement of the gland in the dog’s eye, or removal of the entire gland if the condition is severe. Conversely, if medications are recommended, they are typically topical anti-inflammatory drugs that are effective in reducing swelling.

Q. My 8 month old puppy is chewing off her hair. She does not chew to the point of raw skin, only the hair. Any ideas?
ANSWER : A. I’d agree with the answer below, and I’d add that with a puppy as young as yours the most common cause of chewing is external parasites and fungal disease. It’s important to realize that almost always, chewing is caused by being itchy. It’s essentially a way that dogs scratch.

The first thing to do is to rule out parasites. Even if you don’t see fleas, treat her for fleas. Use a good product like Frontline – it’s easy to apply (avoid the hairless areas, it should be placed between the shoulderblades. You should also consider that your dog might be getting bitten by mosquitos – a common problem in thin-skinned dogs, and depending on where you live they can still be a problem this time of year.

Your vet also needs to perform a scraping of the skin to rule out mites. And again…even if no mites are found, I would recommend treating for them. They are almost as common as fleas in puppies, and depending on her recent situation (rescued from a shelter?) stress can depress the immune system and cause a mite infestation to take hold.

And finally, ringworm, which is actually a fungal disease, should be ruled out. It’s also almost universally related to conditions, like overcrowded shelters, but it does happen and puppies are more susceptible.

One more note: allergies are possible, but other things are probably more likely at this point. If your vet doesn’t know what to do, I would recommend looking for someone who does.