6 yr old

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If it has just happened once and she seems quite bright and well in herself otherwise you can starve/rest her
stomach for a few hours, offer a small amount of water in the meantime and later on some chicken and rice. A small portion and see if she would keep it down, monitor for diarrhoea. If more vomiting should occurr then definitely have her checked over by your vet. Chicken should be just plain white boiled meat no skin no bones.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Along with heavy panting, watch for these additional signs of poisoning: vomiting, hyperactivity, panting, a racing heart rate, and tremors or seizures. Call your vet or emergency vet right away if you think your dog is poisoned. The Animal Poison Control Center, ASPCA, (888-426-4435) provides life-saving advice 24/7.
If your dog is throwing up, but still acting otherwise normal, it`s possible that your pet has either chronic gastritis (inflammation of the stomach) or food indiscretion. Food indiscretion in dogs is very common when they get so excited about eating that they eat too fast or too much, and some of it comes back out.
Shivering/shaking and lethargy/fatigue are symptoms that indicate your dog is sick and/or in pain. The cause is likely fever, ingesting poison, trauma (a physical injury), a virus (parvo or distemper), or an organ disorder (liver or kidney disease).
Excessive licking near the urinary opening. Thickened, firm, contracted bladder wall (your vet will check for this) Fever (your vet will also check this) Shivering or shaking may be a sign your pet is in pain.
Some of the signs of parvovirus include lethargy; loss of appetite; abdominal pain and bloating; fever or low body temperature (hypothermia); vomiting; and severe, often bloody, diarrhea. Persistent vomiting and diarrhea can cause rapid dehydration, and damage to the intestines and immune system can cause septic shock.
Dogs shake and tremble for all kinds of reasons — excitement, pain, old age, even nausea. Shivering and trembling may be symptoms of something serious — like poisoning, kidney disease, or injury.
Your Dog Is Stressed Or Anxious

Fear, stress, and anxiety can also cause your dog to shake and act in a way that isn`t normal. Common triggers of stress tremors include fireworks, big environmental changes, or fear of physical harm.

Other signs that your dog has a UTI can include vomiting, strong-smelling urine, and a reduced appetite.
Dogs with UTIs generally attempt to urinate very frequently whenever they go outside. They also may strain to urinate, or cry out or whine when urinating if it is painful. Sometimes you might even see blood in their urine. Dripping urine, or frequent licking of the genitals, may also signal that a UTI is present.
Symptoms caused by swallowed poisons can include: vomiting, diarrhoea, agitation and heart issues. Inhaled toxins may cause breathing difficulties or loss of consciousness in dogs. If your dog`s skin comes in contact with a poisonous substance typical symptoms include irritation and pain.
Some toxins cause reactions right away, while others cause symptoms several hours or days later. For instance, the first symptoms of antifreeze poisoning can appear in as little as 30 minutes, whereas the symptoms of chocolate poisoning take between 6 and 12 hours to show up.
Affected dogs show signs 30 minutes to 4 hours after ingesting the poison. Initially affected dogs become anxious and have an elevated body temperature. Panting is usually seen. Progressively they become worse and staggery.
Dogs may shake and tremble simply because of the pure joy they feel when you get home, or from a medical condition, or eating something toxic. Shaking and trembling may be the result of nausea, diarrhea, being sick, or from just being cold.
Gastritis is defined as inflammation of the lining of the stomach. It may occur as a short episode (acute) or have a long duration (chronic) and may be associated with underlying conditions that are more serious.
Acute pancreatitis can occur after a dog eats a fatty food such as pork, beef, and some other human foods. Dogs that get into garbage can develop pancreatitis. Pancreatitis can also have other causes, including certain medications and some viral or bacterial infections.
Most dogs with a GI obstruction have severe abdominal pain as well as a lack of appetite. A classic sign of pain is the bowing down position. Your dog may not want to be touched on the tummy. Or she may groan and be tense and wide eyed when you touch her there.
Early Symptoms of Intestinal Blockage in Dogs

Some dogs may be immediately put off by food with others just not eating as much. Some of that food may make its way through, or a dog may always vomit a meal back up, even a couple of hours later.

Diarrhea/difficulty defecating (pooping)/Straining to defecate: A dog with a partial blockage may have diarrhea as liquid squeezes around the obstruction. If there is a complete blockage, the dog may try to defecate but won`t be able to.
Parvo smell has a unique very bad-smelling poop that is not easy to forget. The smell has been described as metallic, with hints of blood stench since the virus affects the intestinal walls, and a seemingly sweet scent.
The first sign of parvo for puppies is often lethargy, lack of appetite, and a fever. Canines will begin to suffer from vomiting and diarrhea as the virus progresses, and can experience dehydration and a high heart rate as a result.
If your dog begins to shake uncharacteristically, develops other illness signs, or you suspect they ingested a toxin, you should seek urgent veterinary care through your primary veterinarian or a local emergency veterinary facility.
Neurological conditions such as seizures, viruses (such as Distemper) can cause your dog to act scared and shake. Neurological conditions cause involuntary shaking and seizing which can be very scary for your dog and cause them to show fear and to shake uncontrollably.
Try a Thundershirt – This snug shirt wraps around your dog and applies gentle, constant pressure, similar to swaddling a baby. It can sooth some dogs into a calmer state. Supplement the scary sounds with music, TV, or white noise. Some certified veterinary behaviorists say classical music works magic on scared pets.
Hypoadrenocorticism is an uncommon disease in dogs, and it is caused by a deficiency of essential hormones that are made by the adrenal glands. Also known as Addison`s disease, the clinical signs may appear as vague signs of illness that come and go.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Panting shaking throwing up one time. She was fine up to 1 hour ago. She has had urinary tract infection about 5 mo ago. What can I give her 6 yr old
ANSWER : A. If it has just happened once and she seems quite bright and well in herself otherwise you can starve/rest her
stomach for a few hours, offer a small amount of water in the meantime and later on some chicken and rice. A small portion and see if she would keep it down, monitor for diarrhoea. If more vomiting should occurr then definitely have her checked over by your vet. Chicken should be just plain white boiled meat no skin no bones.

Q. How can I keep my 14 year old Yorkie from snapping at the younger ones?
ANSWER : A. It’s all about management. Do not allow the 7yo’s to interact with your 14yo unsupervised. You should be there each time they interact so you can redirect the 14yo’s attention onto some toys, or onto some treats when the 7yo’s are around. It sounds like you need to help your 14yo make positive associations with being around the younger pups. You should be trying to feed him treats each time he interacts with them, and doesn’t snap at them. Pet and praise him each time he is around them, or any time they are near. As I said, keep the separated when you cannot supervise their interactions because if you aren’t around when he is snapping at them, you could end up with a fight on your hands.

It could also be that they spend too much time together. Imagine spending 100% of your time with somebody, day in and out, doing everything together… including going to the bathroom.. that might bother anybody. I think you should give them more time apart from each other. Take them all on separate walks, separate them to play with them individually, separate them when you take them to potty, separate feeding times in separate rooms, etc. This can help alleviate the stress your older dog is feeling due to living closely with other dogs. You should always be giving individual activities in a houseful of dogs anyway.. when you expect them to get along 100% of the time, that’s when you find trouble.

Q. My dog drinks a lot of water, should I worry?
ANSWER : A. Firstly, you should quantify if your dog is actually drinking an excessive amount of water. In a 24 hour period, a dog should drink about 1 fluid ounce (or 30mL) per pound of body weight. Therefore, the recommended amount of water intake (in fluid ounces) equals your dog’s weight (in pounds). For example, if your dog weighs 8 pounds, he/she should drink about a cup of water in a 1 hour period. This will be slightly increased if your dog gets a lot of physical activity or lives outdoors.

You can measure your dog’s water intake the following way: in the morning, measure a specific amount, a little bit more than you think he/she will drink. 24 hours later, measure the remaining amount. If the amount of water your dog drank is significantly greater than it should be, then you should take your dog to a veterinarian.

Causes for mildly increased water consumption include: food changes, increased ambient and body temperature, increased activity, urinary tract infection, and general illness.

Common causes for greatly increased water consumption include: diabetes, urinary tract infection, kidney disease, steroid use, and other systemic diseases. With large increases in water consumption, you will also usually see increased urination. Please take note of urinary patterns to discuss with your vet. Greatly increased drinking and urination is ALWAYS a reason to see a vet.

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. Male cat, 6 yrs old, neutered, good health. Suddenly urinating too often/sporadic. Now 4 days into this behavior, what can I do?
ANSWER : A. Sudden changes in urinary behavior such as an increase in frequency, sudden accidents in the house, or your cat attempting to urinate resulting in only a dribble, pain, or blood-tinged and cloudy urine can all indicate a possible bladder infection. Bringing in a sample of your cat’s urine (if possible) or bringing him in for a check-up is best to determine if this is the case. Your vet can then prescribe an antibiotic to help clear issues up.

Male neutered cats are more prone to lower urinary tract diseases as well as urinary blockages due to their unique anatomy. Their urethra makes a U-shaped turn prior to exiting the body and is a prime place for even small crystals or other urinary debris to become stuck and cause a partial or complete blockage. Signs of this blockage can include pain in the abdomen, constant pacing and meowing and attempting to go to the litter box multiple times without success. Blocked urinary tracts ARE a medical emergency and if suspected should be brought to a vet or ER clinic immediately.

Q. Red paws. Biting nails/ toes constantly. 6 yr border collie/ aussie mix. Diet brown rice/ lamb nutro balance changed 3 mo ago. Problem x 1 yr s
ANSWER : A. It is possible that your collie may have a yeast infection or other skin infection between the toes caused by her chewing at the area. You may also see that the paws are wet or have a “corn chip” smell to them (indicating yeast). It is best to prevent her from chewing or licking her feet as this can introduce more bacteria into the area and make symptoms worse. An Elizabethan (cone) collar is best for this. If you see signs of infection, it is best to bring her into your vet, who may recommend antibiotics or antifungals to treat any underlying infections. An allergy medication may also be helpful to stop the original cause of her attempting to lick or chew at the spot. Some dogs may also get into a repetitive behavior of licking even when the infection is cleared up, so breaking the habit with the use of an Elizabethan collar to prevent the behavior may help stop the cycle.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. Is it okay to leave your dog alone on the house for over8 hrs? Will it harm him to not be able to go to the bathroom for that long?
ANSWER : A. It depends on the age of the dog. Most adult dogs need potty breaks after 6 hours. If it’s a puppy no it should not be left that long especially if it’s in a crate. No dog should be left in a crate for more than 6 hours. One month old puppy should only be in a crate for one hour. A two month two hours, ect ect until 6 hours which is the cut off for all ages.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.