Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Possibly. I would recommend having a check up with your vet for a definite diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Bumps that grow and then shrink again: These bumps may be a type of tumor called a mast cell tumor that contains granules of histamine. As histamine is released, they will swell, and as the release subsides, they will shrink again. These bumps can be itchy.
Histiocytomas are an abnormal growth of immune cells in the skin, and are often seen on young dogs. These masses can look angry, because of their bright red color and “bubbled” surface. They often appear overnight and sometimes will disappear without treatment.
In some cases, you may be able to feel a hint of the nodes in their normal state (i.e., small). But it is much easier to detect enlarged lymph nodes. The following lymph node locations are the easiest to palpate (i.e. feel): Submandibular lymph nodes—located on either side of the lower jaw where it meets the neck.
No, swollen or enlarged lymph nodes do not always mean cancer for dogs. There are many potential causes of swollen lymph nodes in dogs, including infections and other conditions.
Some common causes of lumps and bumps on dogs are: Inflammation or swelling that`s usually in response to an insect bite or bacteria. An abscess, or a painful accumulation of pus caused by bacteria. Allergic reactions that look like hives.
If a lipoma is completely surgically removed, it will not grow back. But if some of the tumor cells are left behind, local recurrence is possible. Lipomas are a common tumor found in dogs. Fortunately, they are typically more of a cosmetic concern than a medical problem.
In many cases, lumps go away without treatment. It`s not always possible to tell exactly what causes a lump. If you notice a lump under your skin, keep an eye on it. In general soft, movable lumps are harmless and will likely improve with time.
The most common initial symptom of multicentric lymphoma in dogs is firm, enlarged, non-painful lymph nodes. A lymph node affected by lymphoma will feel like a hard, rubbery lump under your dog`s skin.
Healthy lymph nodes are more rubbery than the surrounding tissue but are not solid like stone. Any lumps on the neck, groin or armpits that are hard, very enlarged, and do not move when pushed may indicate lymphoma or another type of cancer and should be investigated by your GP.
Untreated, the average survival time from diagnosis is about two months.
“In general, cancers that have spread to the lymph nodes are typically stage 2 or 3,” says Juan Santamaria, MD, Nebraska Medicine surgical oncologist. “Many of these cancers are still treatable and even curable at this stage.
The life expectancy with most types of lymphoma in dogs is limited to only a few months. With chemotherapy protocols, this is increased to an average of 6½ to 12 months depending on the treatment plan. A diagnosis of lymphoma in dogs is usually made on examination of a pathological specimen.
While some may be present for many months without growing much, others can appear suddenly and grow very quickly. Sometimes they can suddenly grow quickly after months of no change. They may appear to fluctuate in size, getting larger or smaller even daily.
Abscesses often cause dog owners to ask, “Why does my dog have a lump on his neck?” Most abscesses will resolve on their own. However, you might need to bring your dog in to have the abscess drained if it doesn`t clear up.
Lipomas rarely grow back after lipoma treatment, but another one may grow in a different spot on your body.
Poor diet. Your dog`s diet can actually lead to the development of a lipoma. Carbohydrates, chemical preservatives, and other toxins found in processed food all contribute to fatty tumor growth. Water is also an important part of your dog`s diet.
Surgical excision is the only cure for lipomas, and the tumors will not go away without treatment.
Diet & Exercise

In the case of lipomas, a healthier diet, alongside exercise, may be one of the keys to preventing their development in the first place. Dog`s with a little extra meat on their bones (aka overweight) have been found to be more likely to develop these fatty tumors.

A lump that grows and then goes away on its own can usually be attributed to an inflamed cyst, which is normally harmless. A “doughy” lump is usually associated with a benign lipoma. Likewise, lumps that are harmless can often be accompanied by tenderness, pain, or drainage.
It is hard to believe that some cancers miraculously disappear, but it does happen. Over 1,000 case studies document cancer sufferers who experienced spontaneous regression of their tumour.
a cyst – a harmless fluid-filled lump that may disappear on its own without treatment. a skin tag – a harmless, knobbly wart-like growth that hangs off the skin and can be left alone.
A moveable lump means that you can easily move it beneath the skin with your fingertips.
Of submitted samples, 20% to 40% are reported to be malignant. The most common malignant skin tumors in dogs are mast cell tumors, soft tissue sarcomas, and squamous cell carcinomas. The most common benign canine skin and subcutaneous benign tumors include lipomas, histiocytomas, and perianal gland adenomas.
As the disease progresses, internal organs such as the liver, spleen, and bone marrow become affected. Flu-like symptoms progress and ultimately result in the death of the patient.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Previous question relates. The lump totally disappeared only to come back a few hours later. Also feels like two lumps now. Lymph nodes?
ANSWER : A. Possibly. I would recommend having a check up with your vet for a definite diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

Q. My 3 month puppy eats his own poop and is also biting what can I do to prevent this
ANSWER : A. When it comes to poop eating, you want to consider a few things. First off, what is his diet like? Maybe something is lacking in his diet that is causing him to want to eat his own poop. This is the most common reason why dogs eat THEIR OWN poop. Try a higher quality kibble like Taste of the Wild, Ziwipeak, Orijen.. and try feeding three meals per day, instead of the more common two meals per day. Remember to gradually switch his kibble. Add a little bit of the new kibble and reduce the old kibble very slowly.. little by little every couple of days until the bowl is mostly new kibble! You should also be cleaning up his poops IMMEDIATELY after he does them.. I mean like, you have a bag in your hand, and you are low enough to scoop it up RIGHT when he finished so he doesn’t have a chance to eat his poop.

When it comes to nipping there are a few things you can do. First, you should yelp as soon as the teeth touch your skin, stand up, cross your arms, and ignore the puppy until he is ignoring you. Once he is off doing his own thing, swoop down and calmly reward him by playing with him WITH A TOY so he doesn’t nip your hands. Whenever you pet him, or interact with him, you should always have a toy on-hand so you can give it to him. This toy should be a soft braided rope toy that YOU own. This means, your puppy is never allowed to have this toy on the floor, and your pup can never “win” tug games with this toy. This is YOUR toy that disappears when you’re finished playing, and reappears when you want to play. If you keep this up, in a weeks time, your puppy will be so excited to see that toy, that as soon as you bring it out, he stops nipping you because he wants to play with the toy. Another thing you can do is have two bags of toys. Bag#1 is full of chew toys/soft toys/squeaky toys/etc. After one week, Bag#1 disappears and out comes Bag#2. Bag#2 has the same types of toys as Bag#1, and it only stays out for one week. This keeps the toys feeling like new to your pup!

Q. I have a Peagle who is 3 years old. He eats everything in sight. I have noticed about a week ago that he has a lump in his lower abdomen. He is overwe
ANSWER : A. It’s often difficult to tell whether lumps, if what you’re talking about is actually inside the abdomen, are normal or not. A vet is trained to “palpate” or feel the abdomen and discern the individual organs, and whether they feel abnormal or not. There are many structures in there, from kidneys to the liver to lymph node. It takes quite a bit of training to know what a “normal” abdomen feels like.

If you’re talking about a lump you’re feeling under the skin, this could be something benign or malignant. Hopefully it’s nothing serious, but it’s best to get it checked out. And you should be aware that a ravenous appetite can be the sign of some hormonal diseases, although I’ve also known a lot of Beagles (which is sounds like is half of what makes up your dog) who were ravenous eaters, so he may be prone to overeating. Your vet can also determine if he’s overweight and give you diet and exercise tips for him.

Q. 2 month old Bulldog. While playing gets TOO rough:gripping hand REALLY tight/growling/shaking to the point of drawing blood. Aggresive?Normal?HELP!!
ANSWER : A. For the most part, this sounds pretty normal to me. English Bulldogs can be like this. What you can do is teach him bite inhibition. He needs to know that biting gets him nothing. Each and every time he nips, even gently, you immediately yelp like a puppy would, stand up, cross your arms, and ignore your puppy. Once he is ignoring you, go back to calmly playing with him WITH A TOY. Remember to always use a toy when playing with/petting/interacting with puppies. They will be teething very soon, and they don’t understand that biting you is inappropriate, so using a toy to redirect their attention is important. He needs SOMETHING to bite, or else he will choose your hand. Give him more options.

Another thing you can do is have a toy that YOU OWN. This can be a soft braided rope toy or something of the like. Dot not allow your dog to have this toy whenever he wants. This toy disappears when you are done playing with him with it, and reappears when you want to play. Never allow him to “win” games with this toy. Eventually, the toy will hold so much meaning, when he sees it, he will be instantly interested in the toy instead of your hands.

It also helps to have two bags of toys. Bag#1 is full of chew toys/rope toys/soft toys/etc. It comes out for one week, and then disappears and out comes Bag#2. Bag#2 has the same types of toys in it. This will keep the toys feeling like “new” to your pup and make him less likely to chew on you during play!

Q. Small lump on my dog’s throat, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. Lumps and bumps on the throat or neck can be caused by a wide range of things. Depending on the lumps size, if it is under the skin or appears on the skin itself, and its location on the throat can all indicate different things.

There are a large number of structures in the neck there ranging from thyroid glands, nerves, salivary glands and even lymph nodes. Illness, disease or irritation can all cause swelling or issues there. You may also see additional symptoms such as trouble swallowing, drooling, lethargy or changes in weight and appetite to help narrow down the cause of the lump. Testing via blood work or an X-ray may help to determine the cause and proper treatment.

Lumps and bumps on the skin can also be caused by allergies such as an allergic reaction or sting, or even an abscess under the skin. Allergies are usually treated with an allergy medication to help stop the response and any itching or redness. Abscesses (cuts or scrapes that get infected and swell with fluid) are usually hot or painful to the touch and may ooze debris. These are usually drained at a vet, and then treated with antibiotics.

If the cause of the lump is not known, your vet may also recommend taking a sample of the lump to send to a Lab. This can help to determine what exactly is causing the lump and how to treat it.

Q. We have a 4 yr old lab-pit mix we raise from 6 weeks.If my husband tries to take hin by the collar and make him go out to pottie he growls.Problem?
ANSWER : A. This is not good behavior. Rather than take him by the collar, call him to come with you. If he’s not good about coming when called, you can work on that. Keeps treats on hand to to entice him out and reward him when he does go potty and he’ll come to look forward to it. Clicker training is another great way to teach a dog all kinds of things, from obedience to tricks.

Have treats on hand that you know he loves, then simply click and treat. He will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so he has to come to you. Call and click and when he comes to you for that treat, treat him and give him lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When he comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if he doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If he takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until he comes eagerly. Next, try him off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point he should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If he does not, go back to the last step he performed reliably and work on that again until he responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating him every time, but still praise him. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until he comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time he is overly excited so that he can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something he already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Limping in Dogs

Q. My 4 year old Chihuahua mix began having a series shaking/panting episodes (last 15m- 1hr) out of the blue. Vet’s tests say its not physical.
ANSWER : A. There are many causes for shaking/panting. The shaking and panting are both signs of stress, and your dog may be dealing with anxiety, or stress, related to an event that happened, or is happening. I realize you cannot answer questions on this, however, I will ask some questions that you can ask yourself. Have you recently moved? Have you ever hit or yelled at your dog? Has the weather been bad lately (storms)? Have you had any new guests stay over recently? Have you had any dogs come to your home recently? Have you had any dogs or cats in your yard recently? Was your dog frightened by something initially (a falling pot/pan; a loud bang from the washing machine; a gunshot; a backfiring car/truck; someone screaming in your home/a fight)?

If you answered yes to any of those questions, it could definitely be that. Dogs don’t typically hang on to something for very long, but if it really frightened your pup, then she/he could be feeling serious anxiety related to that specific event, and relating other events to that one.

Do not yell, or hit your dog. I’m not assuming you do, but if you do, please stop doing that right away. It could be that your dog is afraid of you specifically, and you notice the shaking/panting when you are near, because that is the only time your dog is doing it.

If you’d like to purchase a consultation with me (I know, it’s a lot to ask, but I really feel like I could help) I’d be more than happy to ask you many questions, and together we can figure out what the heck is going on here. It’s important that your dog is comfortable, and if your pup is always feeling anxious/uneasy, then his/her quality of life is in jeopardy.

Q. My puppy will be 8 weeks old tomorrow. I’ve had her for a week now, and she still isn’t responding to any training or her name. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. Try clicker training her to come when called. Clicker training is an effective way of training you dog to not only come when called, but can be used to teach a variety of tricks and tasks.

Have treats on hand that you know she loves, then simply click and treat. She will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so she has to come to you. Call and click and when she comes to you for that treat, treat him and give her lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When she comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if she doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If she takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until she comes eagerly. Next, try her off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point she should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If she does not, go back to the last step she performed reliably and work on that again until she responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating her every time, but still praise her. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until she comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time she is overly excited so that she can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something she already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.