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Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You can change his diet into easy digestable like boiled chicken with rice and vegetables or commercial gastrointestinal diet. You can also add some probiotic to his food. Diarrhoea can be connected with stress caused by changing of the environment.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Ingestion of foreign objects such as toys, bones, and fabric. Ingesting toxins or poisons. Viral infections such as parvovirus, distemper or coronavirus. Parasites – roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, Coccidia, or Giardia.
Contact your vet right away if your pup is experiencing repeated episodes of diarrhea or chronic diarrhea. If your dog is showing other symptoms as well as diarrhea they should be seen by a vet as soon as possible.
If loose stool lasts more than two days, call the vet

“Many cases of diarrhea in dogs and cats are mild and self-limiting,” says Dr. Meredith Miller, associate clinical professor of small animal medicine.

Diarrhea in dogs can occur suddenly and last as long as a day or two up to a few weeks or months. If your dog`s diarrhea persists for more than a day, dehydration can be a concern. Diarrhea that lasts longer can be an indication that your dog has an underlying health issue.
While occasional bouts of diarrhea are not uncommon and usually resolve within a day or two, a dog experiencing diarrhea for an extended period of time should be a cause for concern. Generally, if a dog has diarrhea for more than two days, it is considered too long, and veterinary intervention is recommended.
Contact your vet right away if your pooch is experiencing repeated episodes of diarrhea. Dogs showing other symptoms as well as diarrhea should also be seen by a vet as soon as possible. If your dog has any of the following symptoms, contact your vet right away to make an appointment: Lack of Appetite.
Naturally, adding fibrous foods is a great way to firm up your dog`s poop. Fiber absorbs extra liquid in the digestive tract, which helps to harden your dog`s stool. Fiber also helps your canine friend to feel more full, which can be helpful with reducing their meal size (see tip #3).
The following are some of the most common causes for dogs to develop diarrhea: Stress or anxiety. Change in diet or treats. Eating garbage or spoiled food.
Other Things That Can Help With Diarrhea

In addition to rest, fasting, and a bland diet, there are some other things you may find helpful in dealing with diarrhea issues at home.

My dog has diarrhea, What should I do? Fast your dog for 24 hours. Only water is permitted. After the 24 hour fast, begin feeding a combination of boiled white meat chicken (with all the skin and fat removed and the water poured off) and boiled long grain white rice.
Diarrhea can take a little bit longer to resolve but there should be a significant improvement by 12-24 hours and they should be able to keep food and water down. You can feed them a bland diet as this can help to settle their tummy and shouldn`t irritate it any more than it already is.
Be aware that after a bout of vomiting or diarrhea, it may take 3-7 days to see stool again as the digestive system has been “cleaned out” and its motility (movement of contents through system) has been interrupted.
When signs of parvo start showing, the stool gets more watery, becoming brownish to black diarrhea with traces of blood. After signs of parvo start to show and diarrhea gets bloody and smelly, it`s a race against time because most dog fatalities happen within 2 to 3 days after the symptoms.
Symptoms of a sensitive stomach

“Sensitive stomach” is a vague phrase that`s often used to describe mild intestinal upset in dogs. The signs are easy — although unpleasant — to recognize: Occasional vomiting. Recurring, but intermittent, loose stools.

And yep, my puppy wants to eat her poop, too. Even though coprophagia is usually harmless, it can be a pathway to spread infectious diseases and parasites to your dog. It can also cause gastroenteritis that results in vomiting and diarrhea. There are many theories about why dogs engage in this behavior.
It would be very uncommon and unlikely for ROYAL CANIN® diet`s to cause loose or foul smelling poop, however it is important that when transitioning on to any new ROYAL CANIN® diet, that a 7 day transition is followed to help avoid any gastrointestinal upset.
Rice is also high in fiber, which helps to bulk up your dog`s stool and make it more solid. If your dog has been vomiting or having soft stools, this will help clear things up. Additionally, rice is a low-fat source of protein that is easy for your dog`s body to digest.
A soft or loose stool, frequently accompanied by mucus or blood, points towards stress colitis. Your dog will attempt to relieve himself more often, oftentimes without success. In more severe cases, stress colitis is followed by vomiting and weight loss, although such instances seldom occur.
Separation anxiety is very stressful for dogs, and like in humans, stress can cause stomach upsets. This means it`s definitely possible for separation anxiety to cause vomiting or diarrhea in dogs.
While your dog has diarrhea, you should avoid his normal exercise routine until he recovers – just like us, your dog is probably not up for an exercise while feeling unwell. Remember to maintain high levels of personal hygiene to protect you and family member as bacteria such as E. coli can infect humans.
Many dog owners turn to chicken and rice when their pup is feeling under the weather. This bland diet can help soothe an upset stomach and stop diarrhea. You can also give your dog some plain, unsweetened yogurt, which contains probiotics that can help with digestive issues.
Bananas have high fiber content, which can help with gastrointestinal issues in dogs. However, this is somewhat offset by their sugar content. Too much sugar (or fiber) can cause your dog to have diarrhea. Typically, the fiber in the banana should help your dog have healthier bowel movements.
According to Purina experts, many of the same vitamins and minerals that make carrots great for humans are also excellent for dogs. Not only can dogs have carrots, but most dogs really enjoy them.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Rescued a 1.5yo puggle last Monday (@ 25lbs?). He’s had bouts of diarrhea twice (non consecutive days). Can we give him Pepto, & how much/often?
ANSWER : A. You can change his diet into easy digestable like boiled chicken with rice and vegetables or commercial gastrointestinal diet. You can also add some probiotic to his food. Diarrhoea can be connected with stress caused by changing of the environment.

Q. I have 3 shihtzus 2 have diarrhea seem fine otherwise I did change there diets in the last 3 days for all. They eat imams canned food twice daily now
ANSWER : A. Some dogs have more sensitive stomachs than others so a change in diet may have been enough to cause it. Did you introduce the new food gradually? We normally recommend doing it over 7-10 days (a quarter of new food with 3quarters of the old food for a few days, then half and half for a few days etc). Was there a reason for changing their diet? If they were fine on the original food then stick to that. If the diarrhea doesn’t clear up in a few days then get some pro biotic paste from your vet.

Read Full Q/A … : Kibbles 'n Bits Dog Food

Q. Whenever I take my dog on walks he always barks at people and others dogs in my neighborhood. What should I do to resolve the problem
ANSWER : A. The very first thing to do is to make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good, happy dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of chasing the ball and playing with some interactive toys.

Figure out what he gets out of barking and remove it. Don’t give your dog the opportunity to continue the barking behavior.

Ignore your dog’s barking for as long as it takes him to stop. That means don’t give him attention at all while he’s barking. Your attention only rewards him for being noisy. Don’t talk to, don’t touch, or even look at him. When he finally quiets, even to take a breath, reward him with a treat. To be successful with this method, you must wait as long as it takes for him to stop barking. Yelling at him is the equivalent of barking with him.

Get your dog accustomed to whatever causes him to bark. Start with whatever makes him bark at a distance. It must be far enough away that he doesn’t bark when he sees it. Feed him lots of good treats. Move the stimulus a little closer (perhaps as little as a few inches or a few feet to start) and feed treats. If the stimulus moves out of sight, stop giving your dog treats. You want your dog to learn that the appearance of the stimulus leads to good things.

Teach your dog the ‘quiet’ command. Oddly, the first step is to teach your dog to bark on command. Give your dog the command to “speak,” wait for him to bark two or three times, and then stick a tasty treat in front of his nose. When he stops barking to sniff the treat, praise him and give him the treat. Repeat until he starts barking as soon as you say “speak.” Once your dog can reliably bark on command, teach him the “quiet” command. In a calm environment with no distractions, tell him to “speak.” When he starts barking, say “quiet” and stick a treat in front of his nose. Praise him for being quiet and give him the treat.

As in all training, always end training on a good note, even if it is just for obeying something very simple, like the ‘sit’ command. If you dog regresses in training, go back to the last thing he did successfully and reinforce that before moving on again. Keep sessions short, 15-20 minutes max, and do this several times a day.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. Which common foods are poisonous to pets?
ANSWER : A. That’s a great question. As responsible pet owners we need to be aware of food items that can be harmful to our canine or feline companions. Here are some of the most common foods proven to cause illness in our animals at home:

Chocolate: A favorite and irresistible treat amongst most humans, chocolate is considered toxic to dogs. In very small amounts it is usually not a huge issue, but with larger volumes and with darker chocolates pet owners should be concerned. Chocolate contains methylxanthine theobromine, which is similar to caffeine. Chocolate ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, issues with normal heartbeats, seizures, and in some severe cases, death. It is best to keep your favorite chocolate treats in a good hiding spot and out of reach of your dog or cat.

Grapes and raisins: Dogs should not consume grapes and raisins because of the risk of acute kidney failure. Most dogs experiencing grape or raisin toxicity will begin to have vomiting and/or diarrhea within 6-12 hours of ingestion. Other abnormal clinical signs include lethargy, abdominal pain, dehydration, and tremors. Kidney failure develops within 24-72 hours of the initial ingestion. There are some dogs that do not experience these devastating side effects. It is best to contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency facility if you believe your pet has ingested grapes or raisins.

Garlic and onions: We often forget that our meals contain these two popular ingredients and will allow our furry companions a few bites or licks. Onion and garlic both can cause a type of poisoning that results in damage to red blood cells, making them more likely to rupture. They can also cause stomach upset and mouth irritation. Look for pale gums, increased breathing or drooling or any vomiting or diarrhea.

Bread dough: Unbaked bread dough is considered poisonous to our pets. The bread dough, when ingested, expands in the stomach because of the warm and moist environment. This can lead to a bloated or even twisted stomach. In addition yeast is often added to our baking products to help get bread to rise, and when this yeast is fermented it produces both carbon dioxide and alcohol. The alcohol produced can be absorbed into the bloodstream and causes dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Common clinical signs include vomiting or retching, distension of the stomach, weakness and collapse.

Macadamia nuts: Ingestion of these nuts are not proven to be fatal in dogs but can cause them to experience uncomfortable clinical sings, including fever, joint stiffness, vomiting, tremors and difficulty walking, especially in their hind legs. Often your pet will start to feel better after about 48 hours, but supportive veterinary care (such as pain medication) may help ease their discomfort.

Xylitol: The most common ingredient used in sugar-free gum is xylitol, which is a non-caloric sweetener. It is also found in some oral rinses, toothpastes and vitamins. Xylitol and dogs do not mix – it can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugars levels. Dogs will often display signs of disorientation, black tarry stool, tremors and seizures. If severe enough some dogs have developed liver failure. Keep your gum away from your canine companion.

Avocados: Avocados are not actually poisonous to dogs or cats but as many veterinarians can tell you the avocado pits can cause a foreign body obstruction. Avocados contain persin, which is actually toxic to the majority of pet birds. The abnormal clinical signs associated with avocado ingestion in birds include, respiratory distress, inability to perch, liver and kidney failure and sudden death.

Go forth and enjoy your favorite foods, but keep in mind which foods you should avoid sharing with your furry family members. Whenever in doubt, contact your veterinarian for healthy and safe food suggestions.

Q. Seven month old cat has watery diarrhea for five days. Asks perfectly normal. What can I give him to help with diarrhea ?
ANSWER : A. Anytime a pet has prolonged diarrhea, it is always a good idea to schedule a wellness check with your veterinarian. Bringing in a sample of your cat’s stool is also a good idea to check for any internal parasites or illnesses that may be causing it.

Diarrhea can be caused by a large number of things ranging from illness, internal parasites, digestive upset or even dietary issues. Ruling out any more serious issues first is best, then looking to others such as stress or diet is next. Cats can have issues with some grain products such as wheat, corn and soy, and can even have issues with dairy and fish products! (Cats are naturally lactose-intolerant). Changing the diet may help to firm up the stools.

For other additives, adding a probiotic such as Forti-flora from your vet, or a teaspoon of plain yogurt added to the food can help. Adding in a small amount of pureed pumpkin to the diet may also help as the added fiber can firm up the stool. However if the stool does not improve after a few days of treatment, a follow-up with your vet is best.

Q. Changed dog’s food. Now throwing up and with diarrhea, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. Vomiting and diarrhea can occur if food is switched too quickly. Dogs generally need a slow changeover of foods over a period of a week or so to allow their guts and the gut bacteria to adjust. If there has only been one vomiting and diarrhea episode, removing the food for a few hours then feeding a bland diet of boiled chicken and plain rice can help soothe the stomach. You should then return to his old food and begin a gradual changeover of foods starting with 3 days of 75 old/25 new, 3 days of 50/50 and then 3 days of 25old/75 new. However if the vomiting and diarrhea symptoms do not improve, it may indicate something else causing his digestive distress and an appointment should be made with your local vet.

Q. My pet eats too much. I need to know when and how much to feed him. Any advice?
ANSWER : A. If you feed your pet a commercial food, most food bags have a feeding guideline on the side to help you know how much to give. This is a good baseline and is usually based on your pet’s weight or age. Once you start with this amount, you can adjust the amount of food given as needed – if your pet seems to gobble his food and is losing weight or is more active, then increasing the amount is good. If your pet picks at his food or appears to be putting on the pounds, reducing the amount can help. The amount to give is usually best fed broken up into several smaller meals throughout the day rather than one big meal. For most adult animals, feeding once in the morning and once at night is enough. Smaller dogs or young animals may need a third meal mid-day as well. Switching out treats for healthier options may also help prevent overeating or weight gain. If you feel your pet cannot safely lose or gain weight on his own, then making an appointment with your vet can help!