Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Most likely these two problems are not related. If she has green/thick discharge from the nose, is having breathing problems, is not eating or looks lethargic you should take her to your vet. If the symptoms are only mild you can monitor her at home. It is likely that she got cold

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Anemia: Moderate to severe nonregenerative anemia in cats with CKD may lead to weakness, lethargy, anorexia, and cold intolerance.
End-stage kidney failure symptoms in cats include the general symptoms listed above, as well as dull, sunken eyes, inability to walk, body odor, urinary or bowel incontinence, seizures, confusion, refusal to eat or drink, twitching, blindness, pacing, and restlessness, withdrawing, hiding, and running away.
Those diagnosed in the advanced stages of CKD or living in situations where treatment is not possible generally do not live long—perhaps weeks to months.
Early signs and symptoms

General and persistent fatigue, dizziness or feeling cold. Commonly called anemia, these symptoms are a result of your kidneys failing to produce a hormone called erythropoietin, which regulates the production of red blood cells.

This build up, combined with anemia, can result in shortness of breath. Anemia can make the body feel cold even when in a warm room. Anemia that is the result of kidney failure means that your brain is not getting enough oxygen, which can lead to memory problems, trouble with concentration, and dizziness.
CKD is a progressive disease that slowly worsens, but the rate of progression is highly variable. Cats diagnosed with early disease have an average survival time of 3 years. Those with moderate disease live an average of 2 years. Those with advanced disease generally succumb to CKD within months.
In cats with chronic kidney disease that has progressed to end-stage renal failure, the median survival time for cats in stage 4 is 35 days.
Kidney disease can cause high blood pressure and, conceivably, excess vocalization. However, these cats usually have other symptoms that show up first, including increased water intake, increased urination and decreased appetite.
Acute kidney disease—If your kitty suffers a severe and/or abrupt injury to the kidneys, as with acute kidney injury (AKI), she may become profoundly ill, and stop producing urine altogether, which too often leads to death.
In some cases, acute kidney failure patients recover initially, only to develop chronic kidney failure later. Unfortunately, about half of cats that develop acute kidney failure do not survive, and a quarter to half of survivors have permanent damage.
As for the younger cat, Little says, “While we do see kidney disease in cats as young as 6 or 7 years, it`s very unusual to see kidney insufficiency in a cat who`s only 3 years old. About the steroids, cats can withstand their long-term use, but only with careful monitoring.
Unfortunately, once the kidneys are damaged, they have minimal ability to recover. However, with proper management, most CKD cases progress very slowly. Your cat may have several years of quality, active life with treatment.
Increases in urine output—urine output is a key indicator of kidney health. While too little or no urine output is a sign of kidney injury or kidney damage, an increase in urine output after AKI or AKF can be a sign that your kidneys are recovering.
Wegener`s granulomatosis.

It`s a type of vasculitis that slows blood flow to the kidneys. Discharge from the nose, nosebleed and sinus infections along with fever and blood in the urine could signal this rare disease. The disease tends to worsen very quickly, but it can be treated with medications.

Conclusions: About half of the patients with stage 3 CKD progressed to stage 4 or 5, as assessed by eGFR, over 10 years.
Dietary modification is an important and proven aspect of CKD treatment. Therapeutic diets that are restricted in protein, phosphorus and sodium content and high in water-soluble vitamins, fiber, and antioxidant concentrations may prolong life and improve quality of life in cats with CKD.
With kidney disease, diabetes, urinary tract infections and hyperthyroidism, cats drink more and then urinate more. That can cause them not to be able to make it to the litter box in time and urinate wherever they are, whether it is in your bed or on the floor.
There are several factors that contribute to chronic renal failure, including genetics, environmental toxins, age, and other conditions. Chronic stress that raises blood pressure is linked to kidney disease, as well as dental disease, low potassium, and certain diets.
Most people with kidney failure experience pain, most often in their bones and muscles. But the pain is usually due to a complication of kidney failure. It may also be due to the type of treatment. Kidney failure occurs when your kidneys no longer function well enough to meet your body`s needs.
Often cats with significant kidney insufficiency will become very dehydrated. Cats with kidney disease may also develop high blood pressure. This may cause blindness, behavioural changes or neurological signs.
Initial identification tests for diagnosis usually range from $200-750. Long-term management of chronic kidney failure may range from $100-500 a month, depending on what medications are prescribed and how often fluid therapy is needed.
Less common signs involve internal bleeding, bruising of the skin, skin itchiness, blindness, weakened bones, pale gums, ulcers in the mouth and others.
Kidney Disease: When the kidneys aren`t working properly, your cat may be dehydrated. This causes them to drink more and urinate more. Common causes of kidney problems in cats can be kidney stones, a kidney infection, or even kidney failure.
When your kidneys are failing, a high concentration and accumulation of substances lead to brown, red, or purple urine. Studies suggest the urine color is due to abnormal protein or sugar as well as high numbers of cellular casts and red and white blood cells.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. Home remedies for aging cats with azotemia ?
ANSWER : A. I notice your cat is a Persian, and I’m wondering if she has had an ultrasound done to look at her kidneys and perhaps diagnose the source of her azotemia? Persians frequently have a condition called polycystic kidney disease. The kidneys are misshaped, usually from birth, however the cat frequently doesn’t become clinically ill or have azotemia until many years later.

Really, azotemia, which is the state of having elevated BUN and creatinine on lab work, can be caused by 3 things: dehydration, true renal failure or malfunctioning kidneys, and post-renal causes, which typically means there’s something preventing the cat from eliminating urine (such as a stone in one of the ureters or the urethra.

Assuming your cat has true “renal” azotemia (because the treatments for the other 2 kinds involve addressing either the dehydration or the blockage), there aren’t a lot of remedies, period – much less home remedies. The mainstay of therapy is a prescription diet low in phosphorus and protein, which is available from a vet. Some cats do well with fluids given subcutaneously (under the skin) at home – this helps keep them hydrated and helps the kidneys to function. And there are some supplements, although the true scientific proof that they help is lacking. They’re called Azodyl and Renal Support.

If you want to talk more about your cat’s particular situation we can consult about it.

Q. How should I interpret my cat’s tail movements?
ANSWER : A. Our feline friends express themselves in many different ways, including through the use of their tails. Most pet owners pay close attention to a happy or excited dog, but they are sometimes less attentive to the posture and movement of their cat. Here are some of the most common cat tail behaviors, and the underlying emotion behind each action:

A flicking tail: Many anxious, nervous or stressed cats will hold their tail in a low position and flick it quickly back and forth. This is often referred to as angry tail, and a pet owner or veterinarian should be on guard for any possible aggressive or defensive activity. If a cat is moving their tail slowly, and not exhibiting the flicking motion, then this cat is at a much calmer state.

Vertical position: Most of the time when a cat is holding their tail in a straight, vertical position this is indicating curiosity and a playful mood. A cat chasing after a laser pointer or playing toys will often have their tails in a vertical position showing their enjoyment. This position also helps with balanced movements. In contrast, if the tail is in the vertical position and the cat’s back is arched with pinned back ears then this could demonstrate a feeling of being threatened and thus result in defensive or aggressive behaviors.

The Tucked Tail: Similar to a dog, a tucked tail often indicates submission or fear. Your cat is conveying upset feelings and should most likely be left alone. This tucked tail appearance can also make a cat look smaller and less threatening to an aggressive cat.

The Tail Twine: Cats will often hook their tail around another cat’s tail, owner’s legs or other objects to show a friendly and affectionate nature. They are also trying to indicate whether they want to receive affection from their owners, be fed or have playtime.

The next time you are home with your feline companion take note on how they express themselves through their tail movements, their ears, body posture and vocalization. You can start to better understand their needs and wants, in addition to what makes them uncomfortable or happy. Cats will surprise you with their array of emotions and varied expressions they can express.

Q. I have a cat that defecates in the litter box but always urinates outside the box. It is very annoying.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. I want to know from a veterinarian that has owned indoor cats if they agree with declawing? Also, is the whole digit still removed?
ANSWER : A. I am not a veterinarian, but a certified dog trainer. I have studied cat behavior as well, so I have some knowledge in that area. Cats need their claws in my opinion. When a cat is declawed, it can sometimes cause serious anxiety and frustration in the declawed cat. This is because the cat can not de-stress by digging at a scratching post, and a cat feels defenceless without its nails. It is a sad sight to see when a cat who is declawed is dealing with anxiety. I’ve met declawed cats who seem very unstable. It’s difficult to tell whether or not the cats would be so unstable had they not been declawed, but I’ve never seen a cat who has all of its nails act the way a declawed cat acts.

That’s just my two cents.

Read Full Q/A … : snopes.com: Declawing cats

Q. I just adopted my cat, about 7 months old, and he has discharged, a greenish color, coming from his eyes. Was told it was stress but what else?
ANSWER : A. I would call the rescue and explain your concerns. I wouldn’t think green mucus coming from eyes means stress and maybe whoever told you that was trying to just brush off the symptoms has nothing to worry about. Rescues normally guarantee the health of their animals and should cover the cost of medical bills if you need to take the cat into the vet. Green color can mean infection. Is the cat sneezing? Could it be an upper respiratory infection? Try to explain to the rescue they need to take the animal into the vet. If they aren’t interested in helping please take the cat to the vet as soon as you can. Make sure to bring all records you have on the cat incase the doctor’s office see’s any mistakes or missing fecal tests/vaccinations they would like to do at a later date with the cat (If the cat is sick they would never give vaccinations the same day).

Read Full Q/A … : Eye Problems in Cats