Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Have your pet rechecked by your vet or a veterinary neurologist. A phenobarb and Kbr level should be checked and the dose adjusted if indicated. The blood work (CBC, chemistry panel, thyroid panel, urinalysis along with drug levels mentioned) can also assess major organ function. Your dog may need a change in meds or additional meds to control the seizures. Start a Seizure Log. Record data such as time of day/night, duration, description, diet, activity, etc. Around each episode. This may help your vet pinpoint a cause or triggers. The diet should be reviewed with your vet to determine if there are nutritional deficiencies that may account for the pica your are observing or if it related to the seizures.

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While the majority of dogs respond very well to Phenobarbital and/or potassium bromide, there are a few dogs that will continue to have a high seizure frequency despite having adequate serum levels of these medications, and are called “refractory”. For these dogs newer anticonvulsants may help.
Toxicity to potassium bromide due to chronic overdose presents as profound sedation, muscle pain, central nervous system signs, lack of coordination, stupor, and tremors.
Phenobarbital can cause side effects like increased appetite, thirst, and urination in most dogs when they first start the medication. Phenobarbital is a medication that needs to be tapered off slowly to avoid withdrawal seizures so if you are considering stopping the drug, please talk to your vet first.
Treatment of Bromide Toxicity in Dogs

It can take up to three to four months for bromide to really begin to work to control your dog`s seizures. Your veterinarian may prescribe what is known as a loading dose; these doses are higher than what your dog`s dose will usually be, to build up the bromide quickly.

As with any medication, potassium bromide does have the potential to cause side effects in dogs. The side effects that may be seen with potassium bromide include: Increased appetite. Increased thirst.
Contact your vet immediately if your dog continues to have seizures after taking phenobarbital for 2 weeks. Seizures after this point may mean the dose is not right or that your dog needs a different medication.
* Potassium Bromate may be a CARCINOGEN in humans since it has been shown to cause kidney, thyroid, and gastrointestinal cancer in animals.
Abruptly discontinuing potassium bromide can cause severe seizures. If you need to stop giving it, your veterinarian can instruct you how to do so. That said, if a single dose is accidentally skipped, this is unlikely to be a problem as blood levels change so slowly.
Dogs on steroid medications such as prednisone or anti-seizure medications like phenobarbital often have an insatiable appetite, which can lead to pica.
Some dogs on phenobarbital become hyperactive and aggressive. Other adverse effects include diarrhea, vomiting, poor appetite, and itching. During prolonged use, phenobarbital in dogs can damage the liver. Your veterinarian will test liver function with blood tests at regular intervals to guard against this risk.
In modern medicine, phenobarbital is preferred to potassium bromide as it is safer to administer and cheaper to make. As a result, potassium bromide is typically combined with phenobarbital or prescribed to animals with an intolerance to phenobarbital.
What results can I expect? Some dogs may experience sedation (drowsiness) when first starting this medication. This often resolves within several weeks of starting the medication. Some dogs also experience an increased thirst, which causes increased urination, and an increased appetite which can cause weight gain.
What to expect and monitor in your pet with congestive heart failure: Some pets may experience increased thirst and urination. If this seems excessive, please contact CVCA as we can often modify dosages to help improve or resolve this concern.
Many conditions can lead to excessive thirst or dehydration in your dog, including diabetes, Cushing`s disease, cancer, diarrhea, fever, infection, kidney disease, and liver disease. Sometimes, however, it may not be the condition itself causing your dog`s excessive thirst, but the medication used to treat it.
Exposure may cause coughing, sore throat, shortness of breath and dizziness. It may irritate the skin, eyes and respiratory tract. Skin contact may cause redness, pain and burns. Eye contact may cause redness and pain.
“If you`ve been taking phenobarbital and then abruptly stop, you may experience more severe seizures than if you had never taken it to begin with,” Dr. French says. It could also produce serious “status epilepticus” seizures, which can be life-threatening, she says.
The most common extracranial causes are hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, hyperthermia, hypothyroidism, liver disease, or ingested poisons such as caffeine, and chocolate. Intracranial causes of seizures are diseases that cause either structural or functional changes inside the dog`s brain.
The starting dose of KBr is 22 to 40 mg/kg orally per day. However, given the reversibility of side effects, the upper limit of the dosage is dictated by the animal and owner`s ability to tolerate side effects. In the dog, the t1/2 of KBr is approximately 25 days (range 15 to 45 days).
Background: Potassium bromide was a common treatment for epilepsy in the 19th century and still currently used in veterinary medicine to treat animals with epilepsy.
Potassium bromide is not acutely toxic and it poses a low toxicity hazard. Its oral toxicity is well known and is very low. A high dose will cause only nausea and vomiting. Similarly, its dermal toxicity is low, and it is not a skin irritant.
Bromide (potassium bromide [KBr] or sodium bromide [NaBr]) is a halide anticonvulsant used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of epilepsy. KBr was first used in the treatment of epilepsy in humans in 1857 but since then has been replaced by newer anticonvulsants with fewer adverse effects.
Mild side effects are common when first starting treatment for epilepsy in dogs (or increasing the dose) with Phenobarbitone or Bromide and include increased thirst and appetite, more frequent urination, mild sedation and mild wobbliness in the back legs.
Serious side effects that may indicate a high potassium level include muscle weakness, severe vomiting, diarrhea, blood in the stool or vomit, and collapse.
If a medical issue is to blame, treating it should eliminate the pica behaviors. Medical reasons for pica in dogs are the easiest to treat. For example, if a nutritional deficiency is to blame, dietary supplements, comprehensive dietary change, or a fix in the feeding schedule can correct the problem.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Seizures (on meds-potassium bromide & phenobarb), extreme thirst and pica disorder. Collie weighs about 117 pounds is 3 years old.
ANSWER : A. Have your pet rechecked by your vet or a veterinary neurologist. A phenobarb and Kbr level should be checked and the dose adjusted if indicated. The blood work (CBC, chemistry panel, thyroid panel, urinalysis along with drug levels mentioned) can also assess major organ function. Your dog may need a change in meds or additional meds to control the seizures. Start a Seizure Log. Record data such as time of day/night, duration, description, diet, activity, etc. Around each episode. This may help your vet pinpoint a cause or triggers. The diet should be reviewed with your vet to determine if there are nutritional deficiencies that may account for the pica your are observing or if it related to the seizures.

Read Full Q/A … : Canine Epilepsy FAQ

Q. 6yr. old Chihuahua. At 4 she had 1) seisure. 2) in Dec.,’15 – 3) in 4 or 5 days. Maybe 2) min. Dur. Time. ? Pls. Help! $$ are a PROBLEM!!! Medicare $
ANSWER : A. There are many causes of seizures. At 6 years old she could have epilepsy, but other causes include toxin exposure, liver disease, low blood sugar (typically caused by pancreatic cancer), something taking up space inside the skull (like a brain tumor), or meningitis. Seizures can be costly to work up, as we typically start with blood work in order to look for some of the things I just mentioned, and hopefully rule out the really scary things (like brain tumors) before we get to the diagnosis of epilepsy.

If she has epilepsy it can be treated with anti-seizure medications quite successfully. Many dogs live very normal lives with epilepsy. Left untreated the seizures will likely get more and more frequent, and there’s a very real danger that she could have what’s called status epilepticus, which means the seizures can’t be stopped. I urge you to talk to some senior resources in your area – there are many organizations that help seniors with veterinary care. You can also call your local humane society, which may have some options for you in that department as well.

Read Full Q/A … : ufdc.uflib.ufl.edu

Q. I have a 13 1/2 year old Shih Tzu. How old is he in dog years?
ANSWER : A. It’s used to be that dog years were 7 years to every 1. Now it normally around 5 years to every year as long as your dog is healthy and kept up with vaccines. So he’s about 68ish in dog years.

Read Full Q/A … : Shih Tzu Age

Q. What should a Papillon weigh that is 11 inches at the shoulder?
ANSWER : A. Per AKC breed standard, there is no set weight for the Papillon. The only guideline given is that weight should be proportionate to height. In general, females may weigh a bit less than males; yet in regard to height both genders will fall between the 8 to 11 inch guideline.

In general, if a Papillon is of standard height, the adult weight will be between 6 pounds (2.72 kg) to 10 pounds (4.53 kg). It is not uncommon for a female to be a bit smaller than a male in regard to weight. Females tend to settle down near the 6 to 8 pound range and males generally are a bit larger and are closer to the 9 or 10 pound range.

We have seen some sources list the weight of the Papillon to be as tiny as 4 pounds (1.81 kg) however this is not common and a Pappy of this size would be considered undersized should he or she be the expected 8 to 11 inches tall (floor to withers).

So, with this information, your dog should weigh about ten pounds if she is 11 inches at the shoulder.

Q. Does an indoor cat need to be vaccinated every year?
ANSWER : A. In practice, I recommend a feline combo vaccine every year, but will generally start administering every 3 years once they have had their kitten vaccines and 2 additional yearly vaccines. Rabies, is required yearly by law, and if kept up to date can be good for up to three years also. Based on the age of your cat I would give a yearly feline combo and rabies, and then boost the combo again next year.

Q. My 9 year old lab has tested positive for heart worms. A feed store owner told me I could use Noromectin (ivermectin) to get rid of them? Is it safe?
ANSWER : A. The feed store owner is taking about the “slow kill” method for adult heartworms. This method is the considered an alternate method that has the following disadvantages over the normal immiticide treatment:
1) Takes years (often-times up to 2-4 years) to completely rid heartworms vs immiticide treatment which takes at most 3 months
2) Slowly kills baby worms only in the bloodstream, does not kill adult worms in the heart. Immiticide kills the adult worms that are in the heart directly which is why it is so effective.
3) Higher risk of thromboembolism (clots in the lung artery) than Immiticide treatment.
4) Adult worms will stay in the heart for years and can impede blood flow.
So that is the gist of doing the slow kill method for baby heartworms instead of the fast kill method with Immiticide for adult heartworms. Which is why most veterinarians will recommend the fast kill method as the best choice for your pets care.

Q. how many seizures per week/month/year in a dog would warrant them being put on phenobarbital
ANSWER : A. This depends on the type and duration of the seizures, their cause and the general health of the dog. There is no set number. The veterinarian will weigh the risk of side effects from the medication up against the risk of seizures and will then decide for the least dangerous or damaging option. So if you have an otherwise healthy young dog and he only has a small short seizure once a month, the vet may decide not to put the dog on medication until the amount of seizures increases or the duration increases. You should discuss the pros and cons for your dog with the veterinarian who diagnosed the seizures.

Q. What is the size for Norwegian Forest Cats? How big can they get? What is the record size? Can they get as big as a Maine Coon?
ANSWER : A. A male NFC can weigh from 12 to 16 pounds, while fully grown females will weigh from 9 to 12 pounds. A fully grown male Maine Coon may weigh between 21 and 35 pounds with females ranging from 15 to 29 pounds.