is time fr

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It is likely to only cause gastric symptoms so vomiting and diarrhea but as her breathing is unusual I would recommend having her checked by your vet. It maybe related to feeling nauseous.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Butter has a high saturated fat content and does not provide much nutritional value to your dog. In addition to the risk of pancreatitis, it also increases your dog`s chances of becoming obese, which can lead to hip and joint problems. Dogs can also be lactose-intolerant, just like humans.
Butter isn`t toxic to dogs like Grapes or some different nuts can be. Most dogs will be fine after eating small to moderate amounts. However, if your dog eats a large amount of butter it`s possible that they will get pancreatitis which can occasionally be fatal. This is rarer, and unlikely to happen to your dog.
Upset stomach: Many dogs are lactose intolerant, which means that they do not possess the enzyme needed to digest dairy products. Consuming large amounts of butter can be hard on your dog`s digestive system and may lead to diarrhea, bloating, and stomach cramps.
The stomach is usually empty 6 to 8 hours after eating. Vomiting of food when the stomach should be empty suggests an obstruction of the stomach or abnormal motion of the stomach muscles that normally grind food and push the ground food out of the stomach.
Is Butter Bad for Your Pet? While butter isn`t toxic to pets, it can cause issues including mild vomiting or diarrhea, according to the Pet Poison Helpline (PPH). This is true of all fatty foods, including oils and grease.
What Should I Do if My Dog Ate Chocolate? If you think your dog has eaten chocolate, or they have any of these symptoms, contact the Pet Poison Helpline at 855-764-7661 or your veterinarian or emergency vet right away: Vomiting. Diarrhea.
If your dog ate a stick of butter, there`s not much to do other than comfort them and clean up after them as it passes through their digestive system. Your dog will likely experience diarrhea, so it`s important to let your dog outside for potty breaks as often as possible to prevent accidents.
Can dogs eat buttered toast? We don`t recommend feeding your dog buttered toast, because butter is high in fat and not a very healthy option for your dog. The high fat content can cause symptoms like diarrhoea, vomiting and bloating.
Furthermore, there is no nutritional benefit of a stick. They are primarily indigestible, which means they don`t offer any nutritional benefits. Your dog`s digestive system cannot break down the stick.
The Signs & Symptoms of Intestinal Blockages in Dogs

Painful abdomen to the touch. Restlessness. Straining or unable to poop. Bloating.

Fatty foods such as butter, oils, meat drippings/grease, chocolate and meat scraps may cause pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) when ingested, especially by dogs. Certain breeds, miniature Schnauzers in particular, are more likely to develop pancreatitis than other breeds.
The pancreas produces some of the enzymes that a body uses to digest food. In dogs specifically, pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease. The pancreas becomes inflamed causing pain, loss of appetite, and vomiting. Pancreatitis is a common health problem in dogs, and can either be mild or severe.
Dark Chocolate: Use a scale of 1.5 ounces per 10 pounds of body weight. That`s 3 ounces for a 20 pound dog. If they`ve ingested that much or more, it`s time to call your vet. Milk Chocolate or Semi-sweet: A poisonous amount would be anything over 3.5 ounces– a standard size Hershey`s bar- for a small 10 pound dog.
What happens if a dog eats chocolate? Chocolate contains properties that are toxic to dogs. Depending on the dog`s size and how much chocolate it ingests, a dog can experience poisoning with symptoms that range from vomiting and diarrhea to seizures and sudden death.
If your dog has eaten an edible with any amount of THC, you need to contact a veterinarian as soon as possible. Dogs that have consumed THC can be susceptible to THC toxicity. The effects of THC that give the “high” feeling that is normal to humans may be fairly harmful to dogs.
Negative effects of butter

Although butter has many health benefits, it is chiefly composed of fats which can cause many undesirable problems if consumed in excess. These include obesity, hypertension, heart disease and cancer.

Fatty Foods

When you`re experiencing a bout of indigestion, put low-fat foods on the menu and eat small meals spaced throughout the day, which can put less pressure on your stomach. Avoid high-fat culprits, like butter, ice cream, red meat, and cheese, at least for a while.

Eggs are not only a perfectly safe food source for dogs – they offer much in the way of nutritional benefits. Aside from being rich in protein, eggs are also a great source of linoleic acid, Vitamin B2 and B12 and water-soluble Vitamin A – all of which are wonderful for your dog`s skin and coat.
Yes, dogs can eat bananas. In moderation, bananas are a great low-calorie treat for dogs. They`re high in potassium, vitamins, biotin, fiber, and copper. They are low in cholesterol and sodium, but because of their high sugar content, bananas should be given as a treat, not part of your dog`s main diet.
The most common scenario in which a dog develops pancreatitis is after eating a relatively high-fat meal, such as barbecue meat or a holiday ham. The clinical symptoms typically begin within the next 12 to 24 hours.
Most mild cases of pancreatitis recover after 2 to 3 days of therapy and have a good prognosis. The more severe cases have a guarded prognosis and often require a hospital stay of a week or longer.
Dogs with pancreatitis, parvovirus, or leptospirosis tend not to drink much water, but a brewing bladder infection, other types of infection, or a metabolic problem such as Cushing`s disease, and diabetes can cause excessive thirst and water consumption.
Dogs can easily become dehydrated during pancreatitis, so re-hydration is crucial. Simply providing water at home or using a syringe to get fluids into a dog orally is not enough. In extreme cases, a food tube may be inserted to provide proper nutrition.
Acute pancreatitis can occur after a dog eats a fatty food such as pork, beef, and some other human foods. Dogs that get into garbage can develop pancreatitis. Pancreatitis can also have other causes, including certain medications and some viral or bacterial infections.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. She is 11 pounds and ate 1/4 pound of butter almost 24 hours ago. Her breathing is wierd from time to time and she has vomited 5 times in this time fr
ANSWER : A. It is likely to only cause gastric symptoms so vomiting and diarrhea but as her breathing is unusual I would recommend having her checked by your vet. It maybe related to feeling nauseous.

Read Full Q/A … : MSN News – Official Site

Q. What should a Papillon weigh that is 11 inches at the shoulder?
ANSWER : A. Per AKC breed standard, there is no set weight for the Papillon. The only guideline given is that weight should be proportionate to height. In general, females may weigh a bit less than males; yet in regard to height both genders will fall between the 8 to 11 inch guideline.

In general, if a Papillon is of standard height, the adult weight will be between 6 pounds (2.72 kg) to 10 pounds (4.53 kg). It is not uncommon for a female to be a bit smaller than a male in regard to weight. Females tend to settle down near the 6 to 8 pound range and males generally are a bit larger and are closer to the 9 or 10 pound range.

We have seen some sources list the weight of the Papillon to be as tiny as 4 pounds (1.81 kg) however this is not common and a Pappy of this size would be considered undersized should he or she be the expected 8 to 11 inches tall (floor to withers).

So, with this information, your dog should weigh about ten pounds if she is 11 inches at the shoulder.

Q. My dog drinks a lot of water, should I worry?
ANSWER : A. Firstly, you should quantify if your dog is actually drinking an excessive amount of water. In a 24 hour period, a dog should drink about 1 fluid ounce (or 30mL) per pound of body weight. Therefore, the recommended amount of water intake (in fluid ounces) equals your dog’s weight (in pounds). For example, if your dog weighs 8 pounds, he/she should drink about a cup of water in a 1 hour period. This will be slightly increased if your dog gets a lot of physical activity or lives outdoors.

You can measure your dog’s water intake the following way: in the morning, measure a specific amount, a little bit more than you think he/she will drink. 24 hours later, measure the remaining amount. If the amount of water your dog drank is significantly greater than it should be, then you should take your dog to a veterinarian.

Causes for mildly increased water consumption include: food changes, increased ambient and body temperature, increased activity, urinary tract infection, and general illness.

Common causes for greatly increased water consumption include: diabetes, urinary tract infection, kidney disease, steroid use, and other systemic diseases. With large increases in water consumption, you will also usually see increased urination. Please take note of urinary patterns to discuss with your vet. Greatly increased drinking and urination is ALWAYS a reason to see a vet.

Q. Which common foods are poisonous to pets?
ANSWER : A. That’s a great question. As responsible pet owners we need to be aware of food items that can be harmful to our canine or feline companions. Here are some of the most common foods proven to cause illness in our animals at home:

Chocolate: A favorite and irresistible treat amongst most humans, chocolate is considered toxic to dogs. In very small amounts it is usually not a huge issue, but with larger volumes and with darker chocolates pet owners should be concerned. Chocolate contains methylxanthine theobromine, which is similar to caffeine. Chocolate ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, issues with normal heartbeats, seizures, and in some severe cases, death. It is best to keep your favorite chocolate treats in a good hiding spot and out of reach of your dog or cat.

Grapes and raisins: Dogs should not consume grapes and raisins because of the risk of acute kidney failure. Most dogs experiencing grape or raisin toxicity will begin to have vomiting and/or diarrhea within 6-12 hours of ingestion. Other abnormal clinical signs include lethargy, abdominal pain, dehydration, and tremors. Kidney failure develops within 24-72 hours of the initial ingestion. There are some dogs that do not experience these devastating side effects. It is best to contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency facility if you believe your pet has ingested grapes or raisins.

Garlic and onions: We often forget that our meals contain these two popular ingredients and will allow our furry companions a few bites or licks. Onion and garlic both can cause a type of poisoning that results in damage to red blood cells, making them more likely to rupture. They can also cause stomach upset and mouth irritation. Look for pale gums, increased breathing or drooling or any vomiting or diarrhea.

Bread dough: Unbaked bread dough is considered poisonous to our pets. The bread dough, when ingested, expands in the stomach because of the warm and moist environment. This can lead to a bloated or even twisted stomach. In addition yeast is often added to our baking products to help get bread to rise, and when this yeast is fermented it produces both carbon dioxide and alcohol. The alcohol produced can be absorbed into the bloodstream and causes dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Common clinical signs include vomiting or retching, distension of the stomach, weakness and collapse.

Macadamia nuts: Ingestion of these nuts are not proven to be fatal in dogs but can cause them to experience uncomfortable clinical sings, including fever, joint stiffness, vomiting, tremors and difficulty walking, especially in their hind legs. Often your pet will start to feel better after about 48 hours, but supportive veterinary care (such as pain medication) may help ease their discomfort.

Xylitol: The most common ingredient used in sugar-free gum is xylitol, which is a non-caloric sweetener. It is also found in some oral rinses, toothpastes and vitamins. Xylitol and dogs do not mix – it can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugars levels. Dogs will often display signs of disorientation, black tarry stool, tremors and seizures. If severe enough some dogs have developed liver failure. Keep your gum away from your canine companion.

Avocados: Avocados are not actually poisonous to dogs or cats but as many veterinarians can tell you the avocado pits can cause a foreign body obstruction. Avocados contain persin, which is actually toxic to the majority of pet birds. The abnormal clinical signs associated with avocado ingestion in birds include, respiratory distress, inability to perch, liver and kidney failure and sudden death.

Go forth and enjoy your favorite foods, but keep in mind which foods you should avoid sharing with your furry family members. Whenever in doubt, contact your veterinarian for healthy and safe food suggestions.

Q. My dog ate about 8 grapes (he is a 47 pound shetland sheepdog) is that ok?
ANSWER : A. The amount of grapes that can hurt a dog can vary by the dog’s weight. Toxic doses begin at about 0.18 ounces of grapes per pound of dog weight however, they can affect dogs differently. Any amount of grapes should be considered toxic. Seek veterinary attention immediately. If the ingestion was within two hours, vomiting is usually induced and activated charcoal administered. Intravenous fluids may be given for 48 hours. Blood chemistry panels are checked for 72 hours. Monitor for vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, loss of appetite, difficulty breathing, tremors or hyperactivity.

Q. My dog is a golden retriever breed. 1 year 5 months. He vomits his dog food out (happy dog brand). And he is having diaherra with occasional blood in
ANSWER : A. Get the GI upset under control first. Withhold food for 12-24 hours. Allow small amounts of water or unflavored PediaLyte. Resume feeding a bland diet (1:1 ratio of plain boiled boneless chicken and plain white rice). Feed in small, frequent amounts waiting at least one hour between feedings. If the vomiting stops, continue feeding until the stool is normal. Transition slowly to the regular diet. If the vomiting or diarrhea don’t stop, see your veterinarian. Discuss food allergies and food elimination trials. Submit a stool sample to rule out intestinal parasites. Elevate the bowls. If he eats fast, feed small frequent meals throughout the day or buy a special bowl to slow down his eating. Follow the link for an example of a “slow feed” bowl.

http://www.pet360.com/product/61729/kong-slow-feed-dog-bowl

You can also add large stones or balls in his bowl so he has to slow down and eat around them.

Q. My French Bulldog (11 months) threw up after eating and is dry heaving, plus he’s not acting normal. His breathing is nasally and he’s lethargic. Help
ANSWER : A. Vomiting is a common symptom that can be a sign of numerous health issues ranging from minor digestive upset, to bloat or internal illness. If the vomiting has only occurred once and everything else is normal, a bland diet of plain boiled chicken and white rice can help.

Since your Frenchie is having other issues such as trouble breathing and lethargy, it may be a good idea to contact your vet for advice. Minor digestive upset can cause lethargy due to the energy expended in vomiting, however prolonged symptoms usually indicate something more serious is going on.

Bulldogs are one breed that are prone to bloat (though any breed of dog can be affected), a serious medical emergency. Signs of bloat can include a suddenly painful and bloated abdomen, signs of distress such as heavy panting, whining, or trouble breathing, pale gums and tongue, vomiting and diarrhea, or attempting to vomit or defecate without success. If you suspect your dog may be experiencing bloat please contact your vet or emergency clinic immediately.

Q. My dog is vomiting clear white mucus. It’s day after Christmas. He has thrown up about three times during the night. Can you help. Thanks A. G
ANSWER : A. If your dog’s general appearance is otherwise normal – active, alert, no diarrhea – you can withhold food for 12 hours. If no more vomiting, start feeding small/frequent amounts of a bland diet, like boiled white meat chicken and boiled white rice – 25% chicken, 75% rice. Feed very small amounts to start, like 1/4 cup. Feed every 2 hours, and continue if no more vomiting. Transition back to a normal diet after 12 hours.

If at any time your dog continues to be sick – more vomiting, can’t hold down water, lethargy, etc. – seek emergency veterinary care.