Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Young, old or immune compromised pets are most at risk of being colonized by MRSA. Since your pet is in one of those categories, it would be prudent to avoid any contact that increases that risk.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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You can get MRSA from your pet.

Transmission of MRSA infections from animals to humans is rare, but people can become infected outside hospital settings if they come in direct contact with a person, animal or object contaminated with MRSA.

Pets usually acquire a MRSA infection from someone who has brought the bacteria home. Once a pet is infected, it could easily transfer the bacteria to additional human beings, such as an individual returning from the hospital or child with a chronic medical problem.
Typically 4–10 days Contagious Period As long as the bacteria are present in nose, throat and mouth secretions. Do not squeeze or “pop” boils or pimples. Cover with a clean, dry bandage and refer to a health care provider for diagnosis and treatment.
Our furry friends can also carry the potentially fatal MRSA disease, but it will not have any effect on them. Children are at a greater risk of catching these infections from a dog`s lick.
MRSA is contagious and can be spread to other people through skin-to- skin contact. If one person in a family is infected with MRSA, the rest of the family may get it.
How is MRSA spread? If you have MRSA, it can be spread to a visitor if you have contact with their skin, especially if it`s sore or broken, or if they handle personal items you have used, such as towels, bandages or razors. Visitors can also catch MRSA from contaminated surfaces or hospital devices or items.
MRSA is a type of bacteria that is resistant to some antibiotics. Although MRSA is primarily found in people, animals also can carry or be infected with the organism.
Many times the bacteria that cause MRSA will be carried around the nose and mouth and the anus. Practice good hygiene and thoroughly wash your hands after touching your dog`s mouth or their personal items and after cleaning up their feces. All dogs can contract MRSA but there are some that will be at a higher risk.
Will I always have MRSA? Many people with active infections are treated effectively, and no longer have MRSA. However, sometimes MRSA goes away after treatment and comes back several times. If MRSA infections keep coming back again and again, your doctor can help you figure out the reasons you keep getting them.
As long as a staph infection is active, it is contagious. Most staph infections can be cured with antibiotics, and infections are no longer contagious about 24 to 48 hours after appropriate antibiotic treatment has started.
Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a bacterium transmitted through the saliva of dogs. An infection can cause severe sepsis with acral necrosis and is potentially fatal. Here, we report the case of a 41‐year‐old man who was infected through a wound that was licked by his dog.
Dogs have significantly different bacteria in their saliva than we do on our skin. Therefore, if we allow a dog to lick our wound, we`re introducing bacteria that may potentially be dangerous. The bacteria may not be harmful to our dog, but they will be harmful to us.
Again, most healthy people are at low risk of getting infected with MRSA if precautions are followed. If family members or other visitors are healthy, it is ok for them to be in the same room with a person with MRSA. Casual contact, such as touching or hugging, is ok.
MRSA is usually spread by direct contact with an infected wound or from contaminated hands, usually those of healthcare providers. Also, people who carry MRSA but do not have signs of infection can spread the bacteria to others (i.e., people who are colonized).
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can survive on some surfaces, like towels, razors, furniture, and athletic equipment for hours, days, or even weeks.
If MRSA is in the lungs, it can be spread in tiny drops of liquid when a person coughs, sneezes or laughs. It can also be spread from objects that touch the mouth. If MRSA is on the skin, it can be spread through skin-to-skin contact with others, such as athletes playing football or wrestling.
Staph infection is quite contagious, including both methicillin-resistant staph (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible staph (MSSA). You can get staph from breathing in infected breath droplets, touching contaminated surfaces including an infected person`s skin, or getting the bacteria in a cut.
Staph infections in dogs and cats are not contagious to humans in the vast majority of cases. The risk of transmission of Staph from a pet to a person is even less likely if good hand washing is practiced. There are some cases where it is possible to transfer Staph from a pet to a person.
Going home with MRSA

If you are otherwise well enough, your going home date will not be delayed even if you are still carrying MRSA on your body. MRSA is not a danger to healthy family, friends or the general public, so there are no special precautions.

MRSA is an ongoing public health problem, causing more than 80,000 infections and more than 11,000 deaths annually in the United States. In adults, MRSA infections that reach the bloodstream are responsible for numerous complications and fatalities, killing 10 percent to 30 percent of patients.
What is MRSA? Staphylococcus aureus (pronounced staff-ill-oh-KOK-us AW-ree-us), or “Staph” is a very common germ that about 1 out of every 3 people have on their skin or in their nose. This germ does not cause any problems for most people who have it on their skin.
Positive animals do not need to be treated for MRSA, as colonization is transient and will likely resolve within approximately 3 weeks.
Dogs and cats can develop MRSA infections, but if they are healthy, the bacteria won`t be able to grow and multiply as well as it would on a human being. Many healthy pets` immune systems can beat the infection within a few weeks.
MRSA is a type of bacteria (germ) that`s resistant to a number of widely used antibiotics. This means MRSA infections can be more difficult to treat than other infections.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Should I expose my puppy to someone with MRSA even though they have not had an active infection in a year? My puppy is 5 months old.
ANSWER : A. Young, old or immune compromised pets are most at risk of being colonized by MRSA. Since your pet is in one of those categories, it would be prudent to avoid any contact that increases that risk.

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. My puppy is urinating a lot. And the lady I gave one of the puppies to said she thinks her puppy has diabetes could my puppy have it to
ANSWER : A. It is not likely that either one of these puppies has diabetes. It is very uncommon for a puppy that young to have diabetes. If your puppy is straining to urinate or is urinating very small amounts frequently and cannot seem to wait for very long between urination, he may have a urinary tract infection. It is quite possible that your puppy is completely normal. I would suggest an exam with your veterinarian and discuss the behavior with them. They may suggest a urinalysis. Your puppy should be going to the vet at 3 week intervals for vaccinations at this age, so you can discuss it when he has his next set of vaccines. The other person with the other puppy should also be taking hers to a vet for proper immunizations and she should also discuss her concerns with her vet.

Q. My 8 month old puppy is chewing off her hair. She does not chew to the point of raw skin, only the hair. Any ideas?
ANSWER : A. I’d agree with the answer below, and I’d add that with a puppy as young as yours the most common cause of chewing is external parasites and fungal disease. It’s important to realize that almost always, chewing is caused by being itchy. It’s essentially a way that dogs scratch.

The first thing to do is to rule out parasites. Even if you don’t see fleas, treat her for fleas. Use a good product like Frontline – it’s easy to apply (avoid the hairless areas, it should be placed between the shoulderblades. You should also consider that your dog might be getting bitten by mosquitos – a common problem in thin-skinned dogs, and depending on where you live they can still be a problem this time of year.

Your vet also needs to perform a scraping of the skin to rule out mites. And again…even if no mites are found, I would recommend treating for them. They are almost as common as fleas in puppies, and depending on her recent situation (rescued from a shelter?) stress can depress the immune system and cause a mite infestation to take hold.

And finally, ringworm, which is actually a fungal disease, should be ruled out. It’s also almost universally related to conditions, like overcrowded shelters, but it does happen and puppies are more susceptible.

One more note: allergies are possible, but other things are probably more likely at this point. If your vet doesn’t know what to do, I would recommend looking for someone who does.

Q. I have a 13 1/2 year old Shih Tzu. How old is he in dog years?
ANSWER : A. It’s used to be that dog years were 7 years to every 1. Now it normally around 5 years to every year as long as your dog is healthy and kept up with vaccines. So he’s about 68ish in dog years.

Read Full Q/A … : Shih Tzu Age

Q. Vet is saying our dog has heartworm based on a sonogram. All tests are negative and he has no cough. I am very confused
ANSWER : A. Very rarely, a dog can have a heartworm infection and still test negative on an antigen test since the antigen tested for is produced only by the female worms. If the heartworms were not fully mature, or there were only male worms present, the antigen test result in infected animals would be falsely negative. This means the test result is negative when the animal is really infected.

An antibody test will be positive even if only one male worm is present. But this test has a downfall, too. Although it is very good at giving positive results when an infection is present, a positive antibody test just means the animal has been exposed to heartworms, but may or may not currently have heartworm disease. A negative antibody test means the animal has never been exposed to heartworms.

If they are actually seeing the heartworms via ultrasound, I would follow precautions by restricting exercise. This requirement might be difficult to adhere to, especially if your dog is accustomed to being active. But your dog’s normal physical activities must be restricted as soon as the diagnosis is confirmed, because physical exertion increases the rate at which the heartworms cause damage in the heart and lungs. The more severe the symptoms, the less activity your dog should have. And the diagnosis should be confirmed. Once a dog tests positive on an antigen test, the diagnosis should be confirmed with an additional—and different—test. Because the treatment regimen for heartworm is both expensive and complex, your veterinarian will want to be absolutely sure that treatment is necessary.

Q. How long should I feed puppy food to my puppy?
ANSWER : A. A puppy should be given puppy food from around the time that the mother begins weaning her pups until the puppy reaches about the age of one year. This is generally true for all dogs, unless your veterinarian has concerns about your puppy’s growth. Under those circumstances, your veterinarian will make alternate recommendations for your puppy’s diet. Otherwise, around one year, you may begin giving your puppy an adult formula dog food at meal times.

Read Full Q/A … : What should you feed a puppy?