Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Cats are unable to taste “sweet” due to a lack of receptors but they can detect certain amino acids. This affinity for these tastes may explain why they are crazy about different treats.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Not all cats become hyper after eating Temptations – most accept the tasty treat before going about their business. However, some cats have an adverse reaction to cat treats and suddenly become hyper. One possible reason for this is over-excitement about the thought of their favorite foods.
Treats are designed to be super tasty, so it`s only natural that your cat will be excited about eating them. When that enthusiasm turns into a bad habit, though, you`ll need to take some steps to keep your cat healthy and to break that habit.
Cats get addicted to treats because of the flavor enhancers sprayed on dry foods. The cat`s natural diet is fresh, raw meat. Cats are not grain-eaters by choice. So companies spray discarded restaurant grease and flavor enhancers on most dried food, including treats.
Dry treats are often high in carbohydrates and make our cats sleepy. Our cats are performers and expend a lot of energy while working, so we were happy to discover lickables. They are highly palatable and easy to grab while on the go.”
However, cats can become addicted to their treats. The more you give them, the more they`ll crave. This isn`t just limited to treats. Your cat can be just as prone to developing an addiction to their dry food too.
One of my cats is an addict, too. I keep the treats on the “tv watching-working-eating-piling papers table. He jumps on the table, scratches my pile of papers, spraying them all over the place. He stops when I agree to give him a Temptations treat—well, I do have to give him more than one.
Certain fruits like apples, bananas, blueberries, strawberries, and watermelon are safe for feline consumption, and your pet is going to love sharing a meal with its favourite human! You can also try sharing a well-cooked egg with your kitty, but make sure it does not have too much oil, spices, or salt.
If they like the smell, they will eat the food even it is tasteless. This is where their sense of taste comes into play. Both senses combine to allow cats appreciate their food as a whole. Regarding taste, cats are not very keen on sweet food, they reject acidic and bitter foods, but they love salty tastes.
Many cats will enjoy snacking on other kinds of foods; they may try to eat your sweet snacks, even if they cannot fully taste the sweetness. In these cases, it is likely the fat that the cat is tasting and craving. Some cats even seem to enjoy certain types of fruit.
And most cats love treats and playtime, so those are always good ways to show your cat you care. Many cats are particularly fond of catnip, so you can try giving your cat some catnip toys or treats to give him a really special snack.
How many TEMPTATIONS™ can I feed my cat? Feed up to 15 treats per 10 lbs (4.5 kg) of cat daily as a treat or snack. If fed as a main meal, ¼ cup of TEMPTATIONS™ Treats for Cats can replace ¼ cup of WHISKAS ® MEATY SELECTIONS™ Food for Cats. Provide fresh drinking water at all times.
Beyond being an enticing meal, TEMPTATIONS dry cat food is 100% complete and balanced for adult cats and made with high-quality protein that helps support strong and healthy muscles. This savory cat food contains 35 essential vitamins, minerals, and amino acids.
Too many treats will interfere with your cat`s appetite for her regular food. This can contribute to a nutritional imbalance in the long term, and can turn her into a `fussy eater,` making it particularly challenging to use special diets should the need arise later in life to manage a disease nutritionally.
Chicken By-Product Meal, Ground Corn, Animal Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols), Dried Meat By-Products, Brewers Rice, Wheat Flour, Natural Flavor, Grain Distillers Dried Yeast, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Salt, Catnip Powder, Taurine, DL-Methionine, Calcium Carbonate, Vitamins (Alpha Tocopherol Acetate [ …
Start by putting the unfamiliar food beside the everyday meal. At first, the only goal is for the cat to see and sniff the new food but still eat their regular diet. Over several meals, gradually move the foods together, making sure the new food placement doesn`t change your cat`s desire to eat their current food.
Not eating dry food can be related to tooth and gum problems. Your kitty might have a fractured tooth, lacerations in the mouth cavity, or gum disease. The most common oral issues include: Gingivitis—An inflammation of the gums caused by a build-up of plaque on the teeth.
Try playing with your cat before giving them their meal. This replicates the feeling of hunting and stimulates your kitty`s brain. Also try hiding kibbles and treats around the house so your cat has to work for their food. A cat maze is another great way to get your kitty`s brain moving and make meal time more fun.
Cats also like to play with their food, so it`s natural for them to swat at things that could end up being prey.
Hyperactive Cat Energy Usage

If possible, spend some time throughout the day playing with your cat. Fishing pole toys, laser pointers, and toys designed for chasing can burn some of this energy. The more you play with your cat during the day, the less energy he`ll need to get out once the sun sets.

As the new owner of a tiny, terrorizing bundle of energy, you may be wondering: Do cats calm down with age? Rest assured; the answer is usually yes. Although it can be wearisome at times, it`s healthy, and normal, for your kitten to be running through the house with the “zoomies” and getting into mischief.
These include jumping onto kitchen counters, destructive behaviors, attention seeking that drives owners crazy, aggressive play, nighttime activities that keep owners awake or excessive meowing. To help avoid problems, cats should be provided with fun, lightweight movable toys.
Every cat is different. While some cats enjoy being kissed, others will not. Some will feel love, while others will not see kissing as a sign of affection. There are better ways than kissing to show a cat affection that they will understand.
Being picked up and held can make some cats nervous, as they are being restrained in your arms. This limits their options for escape if anything were to startle them. Cats are independent creatures, and although they often like to be up high, they like to choose their own perch and not be restrained whilst doing so.
Cats are `obligate carnivores,` meaning that meat is a non-negotiable part of their diet. Keep your cat happy and healthy with hearty meals that include meats like chicken, turkey, and duck. Both cats and dogs only produce a fraction of the omega-3 that they need to maintain a healthy and balanced ratio of fatty acids.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. Since it seems that cats have limited taste receptors, Why are my cats so crazy about their “Temptations?” (treats)
ANSWER : A. Cats are unable to taste “sweet” due to a lack of receptors but they can detect certain amino acids. This affinity for these tastes may explain why they are crazy about different treats.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. What’s the best way to train a dog to use a lead again?
ANSWER : A. It depends on how serious your issue is. If you need to start from scratch: Bring out the leash, place it on the ground. Click and treat your dog. Say his name, work on attention, click and treat for attention. Work with the cheese sticks, or with some chicken.. something stinky, soft, and high value. Allow him to sniff the leash, praise him, click, treat, click, treat. Pick up the leash, click treat him. Hook the leash to his collar and allow the leash to drag, click treat him. Have him just follow you around, click and treat him to hold his attention.

Then, pick up the leash, click and treat him. Then drop the leash again, click and treat. Take baby steps. Then, hold the leash while you take a step, click and treat him for following. Open the front door, click and treat him. Then, take off the leash, click and treat him, and end training.

Pick training back up in an hour, and do the same exact thing from start to finish, only this time, “finish” will be you two going outside, you clicking and treating him a bunch, and then you bringing him back inside. Work your way up slowly. You can’t expect to just bring him outside and bring him on a walk right away.

When outdoors, use a front hooking harness like the Sensible/Sensation harnesses: http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ible-harness / http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ation-harness. These harnesses will eliminate the pulling power of your pup in a positive way. This will put you in control without the use of force. Carry high value treats with you everywhere, and offer them for good walking behavior – treats like white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks, hotdogs, all cut into tiny little pieces. The more you work on walking on-leash/attention indoors, the better it will be outdoors, remember that.

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. I want to know from a veterinarian that has owned indoor cats if they agree with declawing? Also, is the whole digit still removed?
ANSWER : A. I am not a veterinarian, but a certified dog trainer. I have studied cat behavior as well, so I have some knowledge in that area. Cats need their claws in my opinion. When a cat is declawed, it can sometimes cause serious anxiety and frustration in the declawed cat. This is because the cat can not de-stress by digging at a scratching post, and a cat feels defenceless without its nails. It is a sad sight to see when a cat who is declawed is dealing with anxiety. I’ve met declawed cats who seem very unstable. It’s difficult to tell whether or not the cats would be so unstable had they not been declawed, but I’ve never seen a cat who has all of its nails act the way a declawed cat acts.

That’s just my two cents.

Read Full Q/A … : snopes.com: Declawing cats

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.