t

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. I would highly recommend getting your cat medical attention asap. It could be an injury, dental disease, or something else. Please see a vet you are responsible for your cat’s health and right now your cat is in constant pain and suffering.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Swelling can have many causes including a cat bite abscess, dental disease, insect bite, allergy etc. A vet check would be needed to determine what is going on and prescribe the appropriate medicine. In the mean time, prevent any rubbing or scratching the area. I would also feed soft food in case there is oral pain.
Most cases of facial swelling in cats should be investigated by your vet. Even more so if your cat is not eating or having difficulty eating, if they are lethargic and not acting their normal self, or if the swelling is affecting their breathing – this would be considered an emergency.
There are many causes of oral swellings including local trauma, infection, fluid accumulation, and tumors. Above: Benign tumor surrounding upper cheek teeth. Below: Swelling due to trauma from the upper cheek tooth.
Cats that are ill will usually show changes in overall appearance, energy level, sociability, coat appearance and/or amount of shedding, appetite, litterbox usage, breathing, or discharges from the eyes or nose. In general, any sudden change should alert you that your cat needs veterinary attention.
The spleen is an elongated organ that is on the left side of the stomach in cats. Though the organ isn`t essential for living, an enlarged spleen may be a symptom of a more serious or chronic disease that will need veterinary care. Splenomegaly, or an enlarged spleen, is a symptom of another condition or disease.
A cat with conjunctivitis will often appear to have a red, swollen and partially or completely closed eye. The condition is very uncomfortable for the cat and it can progress to problems associated with self-trauma to the area, as well as inflammation inside the eye that is more painful and difficult to treat.
In some cases, eye inflammation may resolve on its own, but it can also be a sign of a more serious illness. Eye infections can quickly become an emergency so prompt care is important.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), such as meloxicam (brand name Metacam®), relieve pain and inflammation in acute injuries and some may be used long-term for cats with chronic arthritis.
In most cases, your vet will clean the abscess area as much as possible, and may prescribe antibiotics to fight the infection as well as pain relief to reduce your cat`s discomfort if appropriate. In rarer cases, the abscess may need to be treated surgically.
Behaviour signs of a cat in pain

Lethargy. Decreased interest in positive things like playing, social interaction and exploring outside. Being withdrawn and hiding away. Appearing lame and experiencing increased sensitivity to touch in specific areas of their body.

Corticosteroids. These drugs relieve pain from allergies or arthritis primarily by reducing inflammation. They include dexamethasone and prednisolone.
Hematomas in Cats

A hematoma looks like a swollen lump under the skin. Most hematomas are caused by trauma, but some cats may develop them due to a clotting disorder. Hematomas on organs or in the brain can lead to more serious medical conditions, but most subdermal hematomas are not serious.

A vet can treat your cat`s swollen and dry eyes with artificial tears, prescription eye drops, and medications that combat the root cause.
Your face may be swollen and bruised. It may take 5 to 7 days for the swelling to go down, and 10 to 14 days for the bruising to fade.
The cells that make up adipose tissue are known to produce substances that cause inflammation in the body. Sometimes this extra inflammation in the body causes the face to be more puffy.
Eyelid swelling usually goes away on its own within a day or so.
Is conjunctivitis in cats contagious? The most common causes of conjunctivitis in cats are highly contagious to other cats. However, viruses such as FHV-1 and calicivirus are not contagious to humans and other animals.
Natural treatment for eye infection

If you believe your dog or cat may have some eye irritation, try using a homemade saline solution made from 1/4 teaspoon of salt and 1 cup of lukewarm water. Drip the saline solution into your pet`s eye using a cotton ball or eye dropper 3 or 4 times a day.

Anti-inflammatory medications, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like carprofen, meloxicam, and deracoxib, are commonly prescribed for managing pain and inflammation in dogs.
An NSAID, such as ibuprofen, may also help with the pain and swelling if not contraindicated. If the swelling doesn`t improve or is associated with a more serious injury such as a broken bone, a traumatic head injury or concussion, you should contact your health care provider or go to the emergency department.
In the early stages of dehydration, your body tries to hold on to fluid causing water retention. Water is drawn into the blood vessels, causing them to swell. This leads to areas of the body, especially the face, becoming bloated and puffy looking.
Apply a clean cloth soaked in warm water or a warm compress to the site. Try to keep it on the wound for a minute or two at a time. Applying hydrogen peroxide directly to open wounds is not recommended and it may cause further tissue damage.
Abscesses for cats may or may not heal on their own. For the safety of the cat, at first notice of an abscess you should contact your vet and have your vet examine them.
A runny or stuffed-up nose is the most common clinical sign in cats with chronic upper respiratory infections. The nasal discharge tends to be thick and often yellow. It may also be red-tinged (fresh blood) or brown (older blood). One or both nostrils may be involved.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. The left side of my cat face is swollen his eye is almost swollen shut. His cheek is real puffy. He’s been throwing up. Drinks, but won’t eat
ANSWER : A. I would highly recommend getting your cat medical attention asap. It could be an injury, dental disease, or something else. Please see a vet you are responsible for your cat’s health and right now your cat is in constant pain and suffering.

Q. Cat was vomiting for a few days. Took to vet, received anti-nausea medicine 2 days ago. Drinks and no longer vomits, but won’t eat. I’m worried
ANSWER : A. If your cat has been feeling nauseated, it is possible that the nausea, or just general illness is making him want to eat less. However, you can try enticing him to eat with a few tricks geared to cats.

Warming up wet foods or even bland people foods such as plain chicken or boiled hamburger can make food more interesting to cats. Cats tend to go for aromatic rather than flavorful foods, so making the food as “smelly” as possible may encourage your cat to take a bite. Bland foods are also good for helping to soothe upset stomachs, which may still be happening if your cat had recently had a vomiting episode.

However, if enticing your cat to eat does not work, or he continues to refuse to eat any food, it is best to contact your local veterinarian for more care and testing. Cats can become very ill if they refuse to eat for more than a few days, and finding the underlying cause can help your cat feel better.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. Cat’s been vomiting a lot and has become very common. The vomit used to be tubular, but is now liquid. Now she’s not eating, weak, and sleeping more
ANSWER : A. Your cat’s symptoms are very concerning. Cats cannot go more than a few days without eating or they risk liver damage. Your cat needs to be seen by your vet for an exam and bloodwork to determine the cause for your cat’s loss of appetite. Based on the findings, your vet will be able to give you a clearer picture of what is going on with your cat and be able to offer you treatment options.

Try enticing your pet to eat with beef or chicken baby food that does not contain onion or garlic powder. Onion and garlic causes anemia. Warm it in the microwave for a few seconds. Stir it with your finger first to make sure there are no hot spots and that it isn’t too hot. This makes it more aromatic and appealing to your pet. Wetting dry food or mixing wet food with low sodium chicken broth, also warmed, might entice your pet to eat. Some cats like to be petted while they eat, some want to be left alone. You’ll know your cat’s habits and be able to act accordingly.

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. My cat has a runny nose along with runny eyes. Should I worry?
ANSWER : A. Runny noses and eyes are common disorders in cats, and are usually a sign of an underlying condition. The most common one being an Upper Respiratory Infection.

This condition, also known as “cat flu”, is seen most often in kittens. It is caused by one of several viruses or bacteria and common symptoms include a runny nose, runny eyes, sneezing, wheezing and congestion.

In some cases, the discharge may change color to greenish or yellow, indicating a secondary infection. Cats that are in high stress environments or in contact with other cats are most likely to get URIs.

At home, be sure to keep your cat eating and drinking to prevent dehydration. You can also use a warm washcloth to remove any debris from the eyes or nose that is making seeing or breathing difficult.

Finally, keep in mind that if the symptoms continue for more than a day or two, the discharge becomes green or yellow, or your cat appears to be feverish or in distress, veterinary care should be sought without further delay.