Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You should be very concerned. If intestinal blockage is undetected it may lead to serious complications. It should be rule in or out as soon as possible. Your dog may need another x-ray or contrast study. You should talk to your vet about further investigation if he/she hasn’t offered any yet.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Sometimes foreign objects are able to pass on their own with time. But, when it comes to a timeline for intestinal blockages in dogs, every second counts. If the object does not pass on its own and your dog is exhibiting the symptoms detailed above, your pup will need to be treated as fast as possible.
Bowel Obstruction Surgery for Dogs

During the intestinal surgery, your vet will make an incision into your dog`s abdomen near the blockage site and carefully extract the object. The length of surgery can vary because they may need to repair any damage to the stomach or intestinal wall resulting from the obstruction.

They are particularly effective at identifying intestinal blockages and are used frequently when dogs are suspected of swallowing a foreign object. However, as effective as they are, there are some objects that x-rays do not display so clearly.
If you saw your dog eat a foreign object, you might be wondering how you can help your dog pass that obstruction. The short answer is to take your dog to your vet.
Partial obstructions can occur where some food can move around an object or where the object makes its way pretty far through the intestinal tract before finally getting lodged. In these situations, significant signs of a blockage may not be apparent for 24 hours or more, but less severe signs may be present.
For the intestinal surgery, your vet will make an incision into your dog`s abdomen near the blockage site and carefully extract the object. The length of surgery can vary because they may need to repair any damage to the stomach or intestinal wall resulting from the obstruction.
On average, you should expect to spend anywhere from $2,000 to $10,000 on intestinal blockage surgery.
The real concern involves the potential damage these stones can cause to your pet`s urinary organs and vessels. A total urinary blockage represents a genuine emergency that requires immediate care. X-rays and other diagnostic imaging techniques can reveal the exact location of the stone creating problems for your pet.
You can add a small amount (half a teaspoon for small dogs, two teaspoons for large dogs) of olive or coconut oil to their food to help with mild constipation, but be careful in dogs who need a low-fat diet. Lack of exercise is another predisposing factor to pay attention to.
Certain food ingredients can also cause intestinal blockage in dogs. Fruits like mangoes and avocados have large and hard pits that, when swallowed, can lodge and get stuck along the intestine and cause obstruction. Corn cobs are also a common cause of obstruction in larger dogs.
A pet with a urinary obstruction is unable to urinate normally. Urinary obstructions may be partial or complete, and the signs you may notice at home can range from subtle signs like taking longer than normal to urinate or urinating small amounts in several spots to severe signs such as collapse.
Most of the time, complete blockages require a stay in the hospital and possibly surgery. But if your bowel is only partly blocked, your doctor may tell you to wait until it clears on its own and you are able to pass gas and stool. If so, there are things you can do at home to help make you feel better.
The Symptoms of Abdominal and Intestinal Blockages

It is important to bring your dog in for immediate emergency care if you notice any signs or symptoms as the mortality rate is 15%. Here are the signs and symptoms of bowel obstruction and abdominal twisting: Dry heaving.

It generally takes ingesta (all that is swallowed) from 10-24 hours to move through the entire digestive tract. Some objects, however, can actually remain in the stomach for longer periods of time, even months.
Ask your vet if it`s okay to feed a bulky meal of dry food or a slice of plain bread. This may cushion stones or other heavy objects and help them move on out. Food also activates digestive juices, which can help soften wads of rawhide so they pass more readily.
What Causes Bowel Obstruction In Dogs? Most frequently, bowel obstructions are caused when a dog ingests foreign objects, such as toys, rocks, bones, and more. These objects are unable to pass through the intestines and become lodged. They can also cause perforation of the stomach and intestines.
Also, unlike humans, dogs tend to eat things that are not food—like hair, toys, and kitty litter—and these may cause blockages and abnormal fecal transit. Bones, bone meal, and other sources of dietary calcium can contribute to constipation.
If your dog is constipated, try giving them high-fiber foods like carrots, kale, or cabbage. Exercising also helps stimulate bowel movement, so take your dog on more walks. You should also make sure to increase your dog`s fluid intake.
It can even lead to a trip to the emergency room, as toilet paper can cause blockages in dog`s intestines that require surgery. Signs of a blocked intestine include weight loss, bloating, pain, or an inability to eat.
Dogs need roughage in their diets and grass is a good source of fiber. A lack of roughage affects the dog`s ability to digest food and pass stool, so grass may actually help their bodily functions run more smoothly.
Should I stop my dog from eating grass? Eating grass is a normal behaviour for dogs. It`s unlikely that they`ll get much nutrition from it, but for an otherwise healthy dog that is regularly wormed, eating grass every now and again is unlikely to be something to worry about.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. The vet said our rotttie may have an intestinal blockage because he has a lot of gas build up. The xrays were clear. Should I be concerned?
ANSWER : A. You should be very concerned. If intestinal blockage is undetected it may lead to serious complications. It should be rule in or out as soon as possible. Your dog may need another x-ray or contrast study. You should talk to your vet about further investigation if he/she hasn’t offered any yet.

Q. Male neutered cat [1 1/2 years old] has just started trying to spray everywhere around the house. Nothing is coming out. No recent changes.
ANSWER : A. Changes in urinary habits can be caused by a number of things, especially in neutered male cats. Attempting to urinate or have accidents in places other than the litter box can often be a sign of a urinary tract infection, or crystals and debris in the bladder causing problems. Pets may need to go more frequently, may dribble or urinate in small amounts more often, may have accidents or may have blood-tinged or cloudy urine.Infections are usually treated with medications and changes to the diet, however in some cases of large stones or crystals surgery may be needed.

Male cats can also experience urinary blockage. This is due to a unique anatomical part or the urethra that forms a U-shape before exiting the body in male cats. If a cat has crystals or other debris in the urine, it can block at this point preventing urine from being able to exit. Cats may attempt to urinate without producing anything, may become very vocal (indicating pain) or may have a hunched back, full abdomen or pain in the abdomen (protecting the very full bladder). Urinary blockage IS a medical emergency so if suspected, your vet or local emergency clinic should be contacted immediately. Treatment usually involves a hospital stay and catheterization of the bladder to remove the blockage and allow urine to drain followed by medications and a change in diet to prevent further problems.

It is best to try and collect a sample of urine and make an appointment for your cat if he has had a change in urinary habits. If you do suspect a blockage, then contact your vet ASAP is best.

Q. One of my pet’s ears seems very irritated. What I can use to clean it with?
ANSWER : A. Ear Irritation can be caused by a number of things ranging from allergies, ear infections or even mites. Dirty ears can also cause irritation and problems. Knowing the type of problem is best for figuring out how to treat it.

For plain dirty ears that do not have any odor, redness or leakage of discharge/debris, a simple over the counter canine ear cleaner can be used. Gently soak some cotton balls or a washcloth with the cleaner, and then use these to wipe out the flap of the ear and opening to the ear. Do NOT use Q-tips as these can become stuck or lodged in the curve of the ear canal and may cause injury to the ear drum.

If the ear is bright red or itchy without any dirt or debris in it, it may indicate an allergy. Sometimes an allergy medication can help provide relief in this situation. Your vet can give you the correct dosages of an over the counter allergy medication to use, or may recommend one specifically for dogs.

For infections and mites, changes to the ear such as bad smell or lots of debris and discharge, flecks of black or brown debris, or scabs and sores in the ear may be present. In these cases, it is best to have your vet take a sample of the ear debris to test for mites or infection. Your vet can then give you an ointment that is placed and left in the ear between ear cleanings. Most vets will then recommend cleaning the ears twice daily and then leaving in the ointment after for a period of ten days.

Ear mites ARE contagious to other pets, so if your dog does have them, it is best to treat any other pets in the house at the same time to prevent the mites from spreading around continuously.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. My pet is sleeping all day, not eating. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. If your pet has had a sudden change in behavior where they are lethargic (sleeping a lot) and not eating, it may be time for a checkup with your vet. Pets can often begin to sleep more and not want to eat if they are not feeling well, have an illness, or may just have some aging related problems such as arthritis. Having your vet take a look can help. Until you can get to the vet, enticing your pet to eat with some bland foods such as warmed up boiled chicken mixed with plain rice, or plain hamburger or turkey may help. These foods are often smelly and exciting to pets, as well as being gentle on upset stomachs. Eating may also help to give your pet some energy back until seeing the vet.

Q. Gave my dog Acepromazine to help with anxiety for a 3hr car ride. 3 days later she is still very lethargic, won’t eat and will drink very little.
ANSWER : A. Acepromazine is usually a short acting medication, so the changes in appetite and behavior may or may not be related. However, if you feel the medication may have caused symptoms, it is a good idea to contact your local vet for advice. Your vet will likely recommend discontinuing the medication, and may also recommend making an appointment.

Lethargy and loss of appetite can be caused by a large number of things ranging from stress and anxiety, digestive upset and illness. If you can, continue to try to get your dog to drink water. You may also encourage the appetite some by giving some plain boiled chicken and place rice in a meal. These ingredients are very bland and gentle on the stomach, but the “people” food may encourage eating. However, since symptoms have continued for more than a day, contacting your vet is best.

Q. My puppy is urinating a lot. And the lady I gave one of the puppies to said she thinks her puppy has diabetes could my puppy have it to
ANSWER : A. It is not likely that either one of these puppies has diabetes. It is very uncommon for a puppy that young to have diabetes. If your puppy is straining to urinate or is urinating very small amounts frequently and cannot seem to wait for very long between urination, he may have a urinary tract infection. It is quite possible that your puppy is completely normal. I would suggest an exam with your veterinarian and discuss the behavior with them. They may suggest a urinalysis. Your puppy should be going to the vet at 3 week intervals for vaccinations at this age, so you can discuss it when he has his next set of vaccines. The other person with the other puppy should also be taking hers to a vet for proper immunizations and she should also discuss her concerns with her vet.

Q. My dog has real bad gas, what can I do?
ANSWER : A. Gas can be caused by a number of things, however indigestion and food intolerance are usually at the top of the list. Gas can be caused by poor digestion in dogs, and when certain “bad” bacteria in the gut digest the food instead, leading to gas as a byproduct. Food intolerance can make digestion difficult as well, leading to fermentation and gas formation. Changing the diet if food intolerance is suspected to a diet free of common “problem” foods such as corn, wheat and soy may help as well as adding in some natural probiotics such as plain yogurt to the diet.

If the gas continues or worsens over time, or is causing major distress and bloating in your dog, it is best to contact your local veterinarian. Extreme gas can sometimes lead to bloat, a serious medical emergency.