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A. It doesn’t sound like FPV (or feline distemper), it sou ds as though it is more likely a respiratory infection +/- eye infection. It is quite possible that the are suffering from FPV as well as this is rife in unvaccinated cats. The more classic signs of that are vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy etc

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Red, irritated eyes with cloudy, yellow or green discharge could be signs of an eye infection in newborn kittens. You may see the upper and lower eyelids become stuck together and even swell outward. Both of the cat`s eyes may be infected. Protect yourself and your pet.
Feral kittens, waifs of the streets, outdoor kittens, shelter kittens etc. are all high risk for herpes infection. Young kittens can produce so much ocular discharge that their eyes gum closed sealing the infected secretions around the eye.
Yellow or Green Sticky Discharge

Goopy or sticky eye discharge is typically a sign of infection. A clear discharge often indicates a viral infection whereas green or yellow discharge suggests that your cat has a bacterial infection.

Is conjunctivitis in cats contagious? The most common causes of conjunctivitis in cats are highly contagious to other cats. However, viruses such as FHV-1 and calicivirus are not contagious to humans and other animals.
Natural treatment for eye infection

If you believe your dog or cat may have some eye irritation, try using a homemade saline solution made from 1/4 teaspoon of salt and 1 cup of lukewarm water. Drip the saline solution into your pet`s eye using a cotton ball or eye dropper 3 or 4 times a day.

Eye discharge can be a symptom of an upper respiratory infection, such as feline herpesvirus or feline calicivirus. Eye discharge can be a symptom of allergies, such as seasonal allergies or allergies to certain substances in the environment.
You can use warm water and cotton balls or tea bags to get rid of the eye gunk. If you suspect your cat may have an eye infection or a more serious medical issue, you should bring her to the vet for a check up.
Conjunctivitis in cats is not contagious to you, but it is highly contagious to other felines. Conjunctivitis is the most common ailment that affects cats` eyes at some point in their lives; that said, it`s more common in younger cats than older cats.
Symptoms Of Eye Infections In Kittens

Red inflamed eyes and eyelids. Discharge (clear or pus-like) Eyelids sticking to the front of eyes. Swollen eyelids that bulge outward.

Eye infections can quickly become an emergency so prompt care is important. As a cat owner, it`s crucial to be aware of the signs and symptoms of a cat eye infection so that you can know if it`s something you can treat at home, or if you should bring them to the vet.
4 Ways to Avoid Getting Sick From Your Cat. Cats are wonderful companions for adults and children. But like all pets, cats carry and transmit diseases that can infect humans.
Be aware that cats may shed Toxoplasma, Giardia, hookworms, roundworms and other germs in their poop. Plan to change the litterbox daily and always wash your hands after.
Black tea contains theaflavins and thearubigins, which are thought to have antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory actions on the body. While not fully proven, these molecules have the potential to aid in mild cases of canine and feline conjunctivitis (a.k.a. pink eye).
Dip a cotton ball in water. Wipe away the eye discharge, always from the corner of the eye outward. Use a fresh cotton ball for each eye. Steer clear of any over-the-counter drops or washes unless your vet has prescribed them.
A dark crusty material in the corners of the eyes can also be normal. Tears contain pigments that when exposed to sunlight turn dark. This is not due to blood or infection. Just like many people have “sleep” in their eyes each morning, so do many cats.
Kittens develop at differing rates depending on a number of factors, but most newborns will begin opening their eyes between the ages of 2-16 days. Their vision slowly improves during this time, though the two eyes may not fully open at the same rate.
As cats are hunters in nature, they conserve their energy during the day by sleeping. Because of this, many cats keep their eyes slightly open when they sleep. Moreover, they are designed to be aware of their surroundings and be on the lookout in case there might be a potential danger.
One week old kittens will have closed eyes, but no umbilical cord. Around 7 days, the ear canals will slowly begin to open. Around 8-12 days, the eyes will slowly begin to open. Never attempt to pry open a kitten`s eyes; let them open naturally.
Vetropolycin® is a triple antibiotic ointment often prescribed for cats to treat bacterial infections of the eyelid and conjunctiva.
Terramycin eye ointment is a broad-spectrum treatment for eye infections in cats suffering from a range of eye conditions from conjunctivitis, keratitis, and pink eye, to corneal ulcers, blepharitis and bacterial inflammatory conditions that may occur secondary to other infectious diseases.
Stray: Might walk and move like a house cat, such as walking with tail upa sign of friendliness. Will probably look at you, blink, or make eye contact. Feral: May crawl, crouch, stay low to the ground, and protect body with tail. Unlikely to make eye contact.
Stray kittens can also carry various infectious diseases that can be transmitted to other cats in the household, such as feline leukemia virus, panleukopenia, rhinotracheitis and calicivirus.
Free-roaming cats are an important source of zoonotic diseases including rabies, Toxoplasma gondii, cutaneous larval migrans, tularemia and plague.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. There are 6 kittens around my house that are wild kittens. There’s eyes are matted shut with a hard yellow crust as well as their noses. Is this stemp
ANSWER : A. It doesn’t sound like FPV (or feline distemper), it sou ds as though it is more likely a respiratory infection +/- eye infection. It is quite possible that the are suffering from FPV as well as this is rife in unvaccinated cats. The more classic signs of that are vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy etc

Q. What can be given to dogs to stop the brown draining around dogs eyes? I was told tetracycline would work.
Thanks
ANSWER : A. Eye leakage is normal in some breeds of dogs, especially those that are more “bug-eyed” types. This eye leakage is just normal tears coming from the eye which can stain lighter colored coats. Unless there is an infection it does not need to be treated with antibiotics. Signs of infection usually include drainage that is thick or goopy and is yellow or greenish in color. Dogs with infections may also want to keep the eye closed, or may paw and scratch at it.

For plain tear-staining. Tear-stain wipes can be used around the eyes to remove the stain and bring the coat back to natural color. If infection is suspected, it is best to have your vet take a look at the eye prior to placing any medications in it.

Q. We brought 2 new kittens home. One of them is sneezing. We have a Sr cat and an adult who is now coughing. What to do?
ANSWER : A. Commonly respiratory infections (viral -Herpesvirus and Calicivirus- and possibly bacterial) can cause sneezing episodes in kitten especially if not vaccinated yet. If your kitten is affected by respiratory infection could develop or have more signs such as discharge from eyes, more discharge from nose, coughing, being lethargic, depressed and inappetent.

The coughing episodes of the adult cat could be completely unrelated to the cause of sneezing of your new kitten, especially if your adult cat is already vaccinated.

The cause of cough in adult cats are not necessarily related to respiratory problems, heart problems could cause that as well.

Keep the nose and the eyes of your kitten free from discharge, keep your kitten warm and take both of them to your veterinarian as soon as possible to identify the cause and the relationship of the two problems and treat appropriately.

Q. My cat has a runny nose along with runny eyes. Should I worry?
ANSWER : A. Runny noses and eyes are common disorders in cats, and are usually a sign of an underlying condition. The most common one being an Upper Respiratory Infection.

This condition, also known as “cat flu”, is seen most often in kittens. It is caused by one of several viruses or bacteria and common symptoms include a runny nose, runny eyes, sneezing, wheezing and congestion.

In some cases, the discharge may change color to greenish or yellow, indicating a secondary infection. Cats that are in high stress environments or in contact with other cats are most likely to get URIs.

At home, be sure to keep your cat eating and drinking to prevent dehydration. You can also use a warm washcloth to remove any debris from the eyes or nose that is making seeing or breathing difficult.

Finally, keep in mind that if the symptoms continue for more than a day or two, the discharge becomes green or yellow, or your cat appears to be feverish or in distress, veterinary care should be sought without further delay.

Q. Weak, discharge from eyes, swelling on right eye, does not want to open eyes. What is wrong?
ANSWER : A. If the discharge from the eye is green or yellow in color, it can indicate a secondary infection. Swollen eyes can be caused by a number of things ranging from allergies to infections, to injury to the eye itself or surrounding areas.

It is best to have your pet’s eye examined by your local vet. They will most likely wish to place a stain in the eye that can check for damage such as cuts or scratches. An ointment can then be given to help reduce inflammation, pain and take care of infection.

Until you can get to the vet, be sure to not let your pet scratch or paw at their eye as this can make things worse. You can also use a warm wet washcloth to gently remove any debris and allow the eye to open some, providing relief. However, if symptoms worsen, or the swelling travels to the face, head or neck, it may indicate a serious allergic reaction which should be treated immediately.

Q. My pet is suffering eyes discharge, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. Mucus, yellow-green pus, or a watery eye discharge can all be signs of conjunctivitis, which is inflammation of the lining of your dog’s eye.

There is a wide range of causes for conjunctivitis, from allergies, injury, birth defects, and tear duct problems, to foreign bodies, dry eye syndrome, infections or even tumors.

Other signs of conjunctivitis include excessive blinking or keeping the eye closed, squinting and pawing at the eyes.

Treatment of this condition depends on the underlying cause. In most of the cases cleaning, soothing the eye and applying antibiotics eye drops suffice but is some instances further investigation is required to establish the cause of the excessive eye discharge, and this should be performed by a veterinarian.

Q. My cats nose is stopped up on antibiotics. She has a loss of appetite, acting normal though. Is 3 ounces of can food enough in 24h? 9 pound cat
ANSWER : A. Cats with stopped up noses tend to eat much less, as you’ve noted, because they can’t smell their food as well. And the smell of food is pretty important to a cat’s appetite. You can start by warming up the food in a microwave – not too hot, test it yourself by putting your finger right in the center, as the temperature of microwave food can vary – as this will intensify the smell and hopefully make your cat more interested.

Saline nose drops, like those that are used on little kids, are safe to use on a cat to clean the discharge that is dried around and in the nose. There’s a brand called Little Noses that’s available in the U.S. That I like. You can put it on a q-tip and try to remove the debris. Humidifying the air with a humidifier can help as well, or you can put the cat in the bathroom and run the shower enough to generate steam. Don’t use “real” nose drops like Neo-synephrine or anything else like that – cats quickly build up resistance to them.

A 3 oz can of food is an OK amount in 24 hours, but do try the techniques above to help your cat get more interested in food. You might also try some baby food – no garlic or onions in the ingredients – as cats usually really like the taste of it.

Q. I have a 1yr old male 38 lb Labradoodle and my gf just brought a month old kitten home. Can they interact? If not, for how long?
ANSWER : A. Interactions whenever a new pet is brought into the house should start off slow, then can be increased in time. The best steps when introducing a new cat is to allow your cat or kitten to have a room in the house all to him or herself. Allow your dog to sniff under the door to get used to the kitten’s scent, and even show your dog articles such as bedding the cat has slept on. After a few days, an introduction with your dog on leash, or a barrier such as a gate where both pets can look at each other but not see each other is best. This will allow each to get used to seeing the other without the ability to jump, bite or scratch the other. Once the two are used to this, then a face to face interaction can begin. If at any time a fight or scuffle breaks out, separate the two pets and try again at a later time. The amount of time this introduction takes can vary depending on how the two react to each other.

Until your kitten is older, or you are sure both are fine together, do not leave the two pets together unattended. Even a well-meaning and playful dog can accidentally break a leg of a kitten or worse without meaning to! A safe room for your kitten to be in while you are away, or a barrier to allow your kitten to escape to safety if needed will help until both are big enough to play alone safely.

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