r 3 days.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Is would recommend that you take your pet to a veterinarian as soon as possible. Eye injuries or infections can become very serious if not treated properly. The bluish hue may be due to damage, swelling, or fluid build up in the cornea which is the surface of the eye. A raised third eyelid and bloodshot appearance also indicate inflammation. This is not something you should treat at home.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

There are many causes for an elevated third eyelid: Horner`s syndrome (a neurologic disease usually seen in older dogs and cats), a mass or abscess behind the eye, a small globe, active retraction of the globe in painful eye conditions or due to loss of orbital contents as in dehydration, emaciation, or scarring.
Cherry eye is the most common problem involving a dog`s third eyelid. When the ligament holding the tear gland ruptures, the gland is exposed. This can cause the tear gland to become swollen and bright (cherry) red. Cherry eye is most often treated with surgery to replace the gland.
“Cherry eye,” or protrusion of the tear gland normally found behind the nictitans, is the most common disorder of the third eyelid. Common in certain breeds of dogs and cats, the gland can easily be sutured back into place. Since the gland produces 50% of tears, its presence is critical to promoting a healthy eye.
Cats have a third eyelid to protect their cornea and typically it`s not visible. When an injury or illness to the eye occurs, the third eye lid protrudes and appears swollen. If you see your cat`s third eyelid, contact your vet right away.
Sometimes, when a dog is not feeling well, is dehydrated or otherwise ill, both third eyelids might be elevated. The third eyelid can be elevated any time the eye is painful, from a corneal ulcer or glaucoma, or dry eye. Often people see this and think that the eye is “rolling back into the head”.
the pupil of the eye on the affected will be constricted (miosis) the eye on the affected side often appears sunken (enophthalmos) the third eyelid of the affected side may appear red and raised (prolapse of the third eyelid, conjunctival hyperemia)
Conjunctivitis. This itchy inflammation of the eye is also called “pink eye” and is relatively common in people and dogs. It affects the tissues covering your dog`s eyes and generally only affects one eye at a given time. This infection can be caused by environmental irritants, viruses or bacteria.
The third eyelid is usually a pale pink or white color and has thin blood vessels on its surface.
Treatment of Folded or Everted Third Eyelid in Dogs

Your veterinarian may recommend treatment for both health and cosmetic reasons; treatment is typically surgery. During surgery, some or all of the cartilage that is defective will be removed. This will lead to the third eyelid being able to unfold normally.

One popular method is using a warm, damp cloth to gently clean and soothe the eye area. Another option is using a saline solution to flush out any irritants.
In general, if you notice your cat`s third eyelid protruding for more than a few hours, you should contact your veterinarian.
Your vet will start with a clinical examination and a thorough eye check. Further tests may be required (including faecal and blood tests), and your cat might need a special diet or medication. And just so you know, depending on the diagnosis, a prolapsed third eyelid can take up to 4 weeks to return to normal.
The signs may persist for 4 to 6 weeks, but usually the condition is self-limiting, meaning that it resolves without any specific treatment. All cats recover from the condition, so if protrusion of the third eyelids persist for more than four months, the diagnosis will be reconsidered.
A dog`s third eyelid—also called the nictitating membrane—is usually hidden, with only a small portion normally visible. If you look closely into your dog`s eyes, you will see a small triangular segment of his third eyelid at the inner corner of his eyes. The third eyelid is typically black, brown, or (rarely) pink.
Deep levels of relaxation can cause a cat`s third eyelid to show momentarily, but that`s completely normal; however, if your cat`s third eyelid is visible while he`s awake and alert, there could be an underlying medical condition causing this behavior that you should consult with your trusted vet as soon as possible.
Drooping of the upper eyelid (ptosis) Slight elevation of the lower lid, sometimes called upside-down ptosis. Sunken appearance of the affected eye. Little or no sweating (anhidrosis) on the affected side of the face.
Also known as the nictitating membrane or haw, the dog`s third eyelid is something most owners aren`t aware of until they see it for the first time. All dogs have this membrane found in the inner corner of the eye, but it is typically noticed only when it is drawn horizontally across part of the eye.
Why Eyes Turning White Occurs in Dogs. Lenticular sclerosis occurs when there is a blue/white transparent “haze” that develops within the lens of the eye in senior dogs. It is a naturally occurring condition associated with effects of aging, which can lead to white and cloudy eyes.
Just like with humans, puppy bloodshot eyes are caused by blood vessels rushing to the scene of irritation or infection. This can happen as part of an overall eye problem or as a response to stress.
Some dogs react badly to common allergens and this can cause their eyes to become red and bloodshot. This is very common in dogs with large eyes that are exposed to the light and allergens such as: pollen, dirt, debris, and dust.
If your dog`s eyes are weeping, watering more than usual, or you notice yellow, green or white coloured discharge, they may have an eye infection. Other signs of eye infections in dogs include pawing at their eye, blinking more than usual, swelling, redness and squinting.
Healthy eyes should be clear and bright with a wet look to them. The iris can be all one color, streaked with a second color, or marbled (multi-color). Pay attention if you see changes in the iris, especially dark or black spots, a distortion in the pupil, or a change in the iris` shape.
The tear gland is kept in place by ligaments, but when those ligaments break down, the gland can prolapse and “pop out,” creating the appearance of a red, cherry-like growth in the corner of your dog`s eye. Cherry eye can come and go, or it can be constant in your dog`s eye.
How long does a dog eye injury take to heal? Depending on the type of injury this could be a few days to weeks. A simple corneal ulcer should heal within 7 days and an eyelid injury that has been surgically repaired should heal within 7-10 days.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Third eyelid coming up from bottom inner edge of eye, bloodshot above eye, slight white-ish discharge, slight blue-ish hue to eye, had it for 3 days.
ANSWER : A. Is would recommend that you take your pet to a veterinarian as soon as possible. Eye injuries or infections can become very serious if not treated properly. The bluish hue may be due to damage, swelling, or fluid build up in the cornea which is the surface of the eye. A raised third eyelid and bloodshot appearance also indicate inflammation. This is not something you should treat at home.

Q. I was told by my vet that my dogs cherry eye was caused by something hitting his eye when he was poking around under a bush. I was told surgery needed
ANSWER : A. Prolapsed gland of the eyelid refers to a pink mass protruding from the animal’s eyelid; it is also called a “cherry eye.” Normally, the gland is anchored by an attachment made up of fibrous material. The most common sign of “cherry eye” is an oval mass protruding from the dogs’s third eyelid. It can occur in one or both eyes, and may be accompanied by swelling and irritation. He may have acquired it by getting an injury to his eye but this isn’t the case sometimes. Sometimes there is a weakness in the fibrous attachment.

The veterinarian will review the mass in the dog’s third eyelid and determine if there is an underlying cause for the condition. The diagnosis of the prolapsed gland could be scrolled or everted cartilage in the third eyelid, abnormal cells in the third eye, or a prolapse of fat in the dog’s eye.

Treatment often includes surgical replacement of the gland in the dog’s eye, or removal of the entire gland if the condition is severe. Conversely, if medications are recommended, they are typically topical anti-inflammatory drugs that are effective in reducing swelling.

Q. We have a 4 yr old lab-pit mix we raise from 6 weeks.If my husband tries to take hin by the collar and make him go out to pottie he growls.Problem?
ANSWER : A. This is not good behavior. Rather than take him by the collar, call him to come with you. If he’s not good about coming when called, you can work on that. Keeps treats on hand to to entice him out and reward him when he does go potty and he’ll come to look forward to it. Clicker training is another great way to teach a dog all kinds of things, from obedience to tricks.

Have treats on hand that you know he loves, then simply click and treat. He will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so he has to come to you. Call and click and when he comes to you for that treat, treat him and give him lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When he comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if he doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If he takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until he comes eagerly. Next, try him off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point he should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If he does not, go back to the last step he performed reliably and work on that again until he responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating him every time, but still praise him. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until he comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time he is overly excited so that he can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something he already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Limping in Dogs

Q. My puppy will be 8 weeks old tomorrow. I’ve had her for a week now, and she still isn’t responding to any training or her name. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. Try clicker training her to come when called. Clicker training is an effective way of training you dog to not only come when called, but can be used to teach a variety of tricks and tasks.

Have treats on hand that you know she loves, then simply click and treat. She will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so she has to come to you. Call and click and when she comes to you for that treat, treat him and give her lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When she comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if she doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If she takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until she comes eagerly. Next, try her off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point she should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If she does not, go back to the last step she performed reliably and work on that again until she responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating her every time, but still praise her. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until she comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time she is overly excited so that she can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something she already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Q. My pet is suffering eyes discharge, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. Mucus, yellow-green pus, or a watery eye discharge can all be signs of conjunctivitis, which is inflammation of the lining of your dog’s eye.

There is a wide range of causes for conjunctivitis, from allergies, injury, birth defects, and tear duct problems, to foreign bodies, dry eye syndrome, infections or even tumors.

Other signs of conjunctivitis include excessive blinking or keeping the eye closed, squinting and pawing at the eyes.

Treatment of this condition depends on the underlying cause. In most of the cases cleaning, soothing the eye and applying antibiotics eye drops suffice but is some instances further investigation is required to establish the cause of the excessive eye discharge, and this should be performed by a veterinarian.

Q. Weak, discharge from eyes, swelling on right eye, does not want to open eyes. What is wrong?
ANSWER : A. If the discharge from the eye is green or yellow in color, it can indicate a secondary infection. Swollen eyes can be caused by a number of things ranging from allergies to infections, to injury to the eye itself or surrounding areas.

It is best to have your pet’s eye examined by your local vet. They will most likely wish to place a stain in the eye that can check for damage such as cuts or scratches. An ointment can then be given to help reduce inflammation, pain and take care of infection.

Until you can get to the vet, be sure to not let your pet scratch or paw at their eye as this can make things worse. You can also use a warm wet washcloth to gently remove any debris and allow the eye to open some, providing relief. However, if symptoms worsen, or the swelling travels to the face, head or neck, it may indicate a serious allergic reaction which should be treated immediately.

Q. One eye is more red than the other. Last night he was pawing at it,today, he isn’t. Should I bring him to the vet?
ANSWER : A. Sounds possible that he had some irritation to the eye that is at least not itchy anymore. You can do either, having it checked now to confirm mild irritation, potentially due to debris or a topical irritant to the eye; or you can flush the eye with sterile saline eye wash (over the counter) using care not to poke or prod the eye and see if the irritation goes away on its own within the next 24 hrs. It has shown improvement already it appears, however if it is not cleared up and your pet seems irritated by it AT ALL, then it should be looked at by a vet and tested for a possible corneal scratch or ulcer. These can cause redness of the eye, eye discharge and pawing at the face. They are usually treated by prescription only topical eye antibiotic ointment and generally do very well after treatment.

Read Full Q/A … : Eye Problems in Cats

Q. My cat has entropion of the eyes. Vet did surgery on both eyes, the right eye seems ok but the left eye is still running/mucus. Can I use Neosporin?
ANSWER : A. Do NOT use Neosporin on cats or dogs as this product can be toxic to pets if ingested. If the eye is still leaking or has green or yellow discharge it is best to contact your veterinarian. Green or yellow discharge can indicate that a secondary infection has formed and may require antibiotics or cat-safe ointments to help clear it up. In the meantime, you can use a warm wet washcloth to remove any excess debris from the eye very gently, allowing the eye to open and help with healing.