Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It can take a couple of days for the medications to fully kick in. If the breathing has deteriorated or you think it is worse then you should contact your vet again.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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The most commonly reported side effects are vomiting, decreased appetite, gas, and diarrhea. If these effects worsen, become severe, or continue, contact your veterinarian. This short-acting medication should stop working within 24 hours, although effects can be longer in pets with liver or kidney disease.
But if your dog has overdosed on veterinary medications or human OTC or prescription drugs, try to induce vomiting with a simple hydrogen peroxide solution of 1 teaspoon per 5 pounds of body weight (approximately 1 ounce for a small to medium-size dog, and up to 3 ounces for a giant breed dog).
Are there any potential side effects? The most common side effect is an increase in urination. Other possible side effects include diarrhea or constipation. Serious side effects include weakness, collapse, head tilt, balance problems, electrolyte imbalance, lack of urine production, or a racing heart rate.
The most common side effects of omeprazole for dogs include diarrhea and/or constipation. Rarely, omeprazole may also cause skin dermatitis. If you notice any of these side effects, contact your veterinarian immediately. Omeprazole is a safe medication when given at the correct dose prescribed by your veterinarian.
Omeprazole can cause certain side effects, some of which are more common than others. These side effects may be temporary, lasting a few days to weeks. However, if the side effects last longer than that, bother you, or become severe, be sure to talk with your doctor or pharmacist.
Recovery will depend on the drug, the amount that was ingested, and the immediacy of treatment. Some dogs can recover from even very severe overdoses if they get to the veterinarian right away. Cases where the poisoning was not discovered until later or the cause is unknown are much harder to treat.
25% of poisoned pets recover within two hours. Of the pets that take longer to recover, many can be treated at home with the advice of your veterinarian or with advice from the ASPCA Poison Control Center (telephone 1-888-426-4435). Even with treatment, one in 100 poisoned pets dies.
Affected dogs show signs 30 minutes to 4 hours after ingesting the poison. Initially affected dogs become anxious and have an elevated body temperature. Panting is usually seen. Progressively they become worse and staggery.
Cancer. Cancer is the leading cause of death in dogs, and unfortunately, the symptoms are frequently not recognized until it is too late.
A furosemide overdose can cause serious issues with hydration and electrolyte balance as well as central nervous system problems (like seizures and even a coma) and heart failure. Contact a vet immediately if your dog accidentally gets too much furosemide.
If your dog is on furosemide for a long time, they may become resistant to its effect. Your veterinarian may need to prescribe higher doses. The adverse effects of this drug are sometimes worse if your dog is also getting digoxin for heart failure.
The usual dose to treat: indigestion is 10mg to 20mg a day. heartburn and acid reflux is 20mg to 40mg a day.
Famotidine for dogs is generally safe, and very rarely do any dogs suffer from any side effects. When you give your pet Famotidine for dogs, you can keep an eye out for appetite loss, constipation, diarrhea, drowsiness, and headaches. Additionally, Famotidine for dogs can give your pet dry skin and dull fur.
The most common omeprazole side effect is headache. But it can also cause stomach-related side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. Taking omeprazole at high dosages, or for longer than a year, raises the risk of more serious side effects. These can include bone breaks and pneumonia (a lung infection).
It`s best to avoid alcohol if possible. Although it does not affect the way omeprazole works, alcohol makes your stomach produce more acid than normal. This can irritate your stomach lining and make your symptoms worse.
The most common clinical signs of opioid overdose include: • drowsiness • difficulty standing • failure to respond to commands • a blank stare, and • weakness, progressing to unconsciousness • inability to breathe and ultimately death. Most canines start to show clinical signs within 15 minutes of exposure.
There are several ways drug toxicity may be treated. If the toxicity results from an acute overdose, a person may undergo stomach pumping to remove drugs that have not yet been absorbed. Activated charcoal is another drug toxicity treatment option.
The recovery from a toxicosis is highly variable and is based upon the specific toxin exposure, duration between toxin exposure and treatment, and the severity of clinical signs and organ damage. Some dogs recover from toxicosis immediately after vomiting, whereas others improve after several hours, days, or weeks.
If a pet eats unusual material which can affects it`s health, it is better to refer it to a veterinary hospital to induce emesis-vomiting- as soon as possible. In general it takes about two hours for a toxic material to pass stomach and enters the small intestine.
Poison Control

Consider using hydrogen peroxide (one teaspoon per five pounds of body weight), to induce vomiting. Dr. Putter advises using hydrogen peroxide (which is a gastric irritant) under consultation with animal poison control.

Potential causes include inner/middle ear infections, intoxication, strokes, tumors, infectious or inflammatory diseases (meningitis), idiopathic vestibular disease (also called “old dog” vestibular syndrome), or other less likely causes.
As our pets get older, they often suffer from common senior pet diseases that eventually lead to death. The most frequent causes of death in both dogs and cats are cancer and kidney disease.
The average lifespan for dogs is between 10-13 years, though there is variability among breeds and sizes. As a species, the domestic dog is incredibly diverse in size, build, and appearance, thanks to human intervention.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Took to vet yesterday DX URI shot given temp104 oral meds today. Still acting like very sick. Worried what do I do
ANSWER : A. It can take a couple of days for the medications to fully kick in. If the breathing has deteriorated or you think it is worse then you should contact your vet again.

Q. Which flea and tick drops are the best and why?
ANSWER : A. Your question is a good one, and unfortunately the answers are going to differ based on who you ask. Many vets are seeing resistance to Frontline, which has been the go-to product for many of us for many years. It contains the active ingredient Fipronil, which is very safe and typically extremely effective. I use it on my dogs and never see fleas or ticks. However other vets will tell you in their areas, for whatever reason, they are seeing fleas and ticks on dogs and cats on which this product was used.

Another reason opinions differ is that some people like to give an oral product, and some like to put a topical product directly on the skin. That’s a matter of personal preference mostly. Bravecto, as mentioned below, is one of those products. Most people find it safe and effective. It uses a different process that Frontline to kill fleas and ticks.

In general the products you buy over-the-counter are likely going to be less expensive and less effective than what you get from a vet. I think the reason is that the more expensive products contain newer insecticides, and likely less resistance to these products has built up in the flea and tick population but also they are maybe less “proven”, so it’s important for a vet to be involved in the use of the product in order to ensure that there won’t be a negative reaction to using it.

If I lived in an area where there was Lyme disease (in the US that’s the northeast and upper midwest) I’d most definitely add a tick collar to my standard oral or topical flea and tick prevention. AND I’d search both of my dogs everyday for ticks. It’s because nothing you buy will be 100% effective, and Lyme disease can be a very serious problem.

If you want to talk further and talk more specifically about where you live and what products you’re considering, I’d be happy to do a consult with you. Nobody here is paid to recommend products, but we do develop preferences based on what we use on our own pets and in our practices.

Q. My cat is still purring but he’s coughing and what sounds like hiccups, he isn’t drinking, not sure if I need rush to vet or be ok he’s still himself?
ANSWER : A. Erring on the side of safety, any time there is change in how a kitty is breathing, it is best to get them into a vet clinic.

Coughing can be caused by innocuous things like allergies, but in a cat his age, there are concerns for things like feline asthma, pneumonia, or a condition like congestive heart failure.

Cats not only purr when they are feeling content, but they also can purr when they are frightened or feeling pain or illness. Combined with the fact that he’s not drinking, it sounds like your boy is feeling pretty icky. Cats are masters at hiding illness to keep themselves from being hunted by larger predators, so when it becomes noticeable to you, it means he’s ill enough that he’s no longer able to keep it hidden.

Your vet should be able to check him out and narrow down what’s going on and treat it as necessary. Good luck, and I hope he gets to feeling better soon!

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. My dog cracked his nail horizontally, I put neosporine on it with gauze and a sock for no snagging. What should I do and what would a vet cost?
ANSWER : A. It depends on how deep it’s cut and if it’s going to snag on something and rip the entire nail off. It would probably be best to go to the vet now rather than later when a more serious injury occurs. The cost really depends on where you live and what the vet decides to do. I really can’t give much of an estimate other than the initial cost of a sick exam (which also varies from vet to vet). Call the vet and when you make the appointment ask how much a sick exam costs, that will be your initial payment (Amount just to see the vet).

Q. My puppy has been acting real weird lately, she been me tired/lazy which isn’t her at all and hasn’t been eating as much
ANSWER : A. Sounds like you should talk to your veterinarian. Are you seeing a vet regularly for the puppy’s shots? It’s extremely important puppies get their boosters shots when they’re young. These symptoms could be related to multiple issues. Your best option is to see a vet and if you see a vet regularly and are up to date on the dog’s shots and deworming call the practice and tell them the dog’s symptoms and see what they suggest.

Q. Had colitis took to vet was on meds, antibiotic and Flygl seem corrected now bloated
ANSWER : A. Sounds like something is still amiss in your dog’s GI tract. The metronidazole/Flagyl corrected the colitis/diarrhea, but now your dog is bloated. I suspect that the primary diagnosis has been missed, and I would call the vet today and describe what you’re seeing. I think your dog needs further diagnostics, like blood work and/or x-rays.

Q. German short hair 37 lbs was running full speed and hit her leg on a big rock. She’s limping and in pain. Far from vet. Can I give her aspirin?
ANSWER : A. Aspirin should not be given unless instructed to do so by your vet. This medication can cause stomach ulceration or organ problems if not given in the correct dosage. If you have a vet you regularly see but cannot get to you may be able to contact them for the correct medication dosage to give for the short-term. You should also try to keep your dog calm and quiet and restrict activity until she can be seen by a vet to help prevent further injury to the leg and facilitate healing. Once you can get to your vet, your vet can examine the leg and provide treatment including a dog-safe pain medication.

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