Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Vomiting and diarrhoea lead quickly to dehydration therefore you should take your pet to your vets without delay. These signs are most often consistent with gastrointestinal upset, infection or intoxication.

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Most cases resolve quickly but others can take longer and might have an underlying cause. If your dog`s vomiting and diarrhea aren`t resolving quickly or are particularly severe bring them to your veterinarian for a check-up. They can rule out things like parasites, an obstruction, or kidney and liver disease.
The cause of an old dog throwing up has ranged from something simple, like the dog eating too many dog treats, to more complex issues, like liver or kidney disease. Senior dogs, like puppies, are not as resilient and may become significantly and more rapidly affected by vomiting compared with adult dogs.
A recent study found that in 90% of cases, dog diarrhea is caused by diet and gastrointestinal distress, in particular inflammation of the small intestine and stomach. Your dog`s symptoms could be the result of bacteria, viruses or parasites in her food, or allergic reactions to new foods or medications.
When signs of parvo start showing, the stool gets more watery, becoming brownish to black diarrhea with traces of blood. After signs of parvo start to show and diarrhea gets bloody and smelly, it`s a race against time because most dog fatalities happen within 2 to 3 days after the symptoms.
Some of the signs of parvovirus include lethargy; loss of appetite; abdominal pain and bloating; fever or low body temperature (hypothermia); vomiting; and severe, often bloody, diarrhea. Persistent vomiting and diarrhea can cause rapid dehydration, and damage to the intestines and immune system can cause septic shock.
If your dog is throwing up, but still acting otherwise normal, it`s possible that your pet has either chronic gastritis (inflammation of the stomach) or food indiscretion. Food indiscretion in dogs is very common when they get so excited about eating that they eat too fast or too much, and some of it comes back out.
Gastroenteritis is inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract (stomach and the intestines). It can be caused by infection with bacteria, viruses, parasites, medications, or even new foods. The condition often causes abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, and other clinical signs.
Pets that have chronic soft stool or chronic full-blown diarrhea should definitely be examined by a veterinarian, even if they are otherwise behaving normally. In these cases, there is likely an underlying problem that`s causing the diarrhea. This is especially true with older pets.
Chicken and rice are prime ingredients in many dog foods, and these mild foods sit well on upset canine stomachs. Plus, this bland meal is easy to prepare. All you need are boneless, skinless chicken breasts and rice.
If your dog has diarrhea but is acting fine and isn`t displaying any other symptoms, the issue is contained in the GI. This means it`s more than likely that your dog ate something that isn`t agreeing with them or has a parasite infection.
The following are some of the most common causes for dogs to develop diarrhea: Stress or anxiety. Change in diet or treats. Eating garbage or spoiled food.
Parvo smell has a unique very bad-smelling poop that is not easy to forget. The smell has been described as metallic, with hints of blood stench since the virus affects the intestinal walls, and a seemingly sweet scent.
Although vaccination is effective at preventing Parvo, even vaccinated dogs may occasionally be infected by Parvovirus and develop disease. The vaccine provides immunity against the virus, but it is not 100% effective.
The first sign of parvo for puppies is often lethargy, lack of appetite, and a fever. Canines will begin to suffer from vomiting and diarrhea as the virus progresses, and can experience dehydration and a high heart rate as a result.
Incubation: During the first three to five days after being exposed to the virus your pooch won`t show any symptoms. Symptoms appear: After being infected for five to eight days, your dog will start to develop symptoms. A diagnosis from a veterinarian: Your veterinarian diagnoses your pooch with Parvovirus.
In cases where the cause is thought to be dietary indiscretion, your veterinarian may advise you to withhold food for a short time, until vomiting appears controlled. After this time, you may be advised to feed your dog a bland, easily digested diet.
Allow them to rest. Don`t force your dog to play or walk if they don`t seem interested. Their body will need to naturally recover after vomiting, which is generally over a period of 1-2 days.
If your dog vomits more than once, or has recurring bouts of vomiting, you need to call your vet immediately. Vomiting is a symptom of many serious diseases, illnesses, and complications, and as owners we owe it to our dogs to take it seriously. Ignoring your dog`s vomiting could have serious, even fatal consequences.
The clinical signs of more advanced kidney failure include loss of appetite, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and very bad breath. Occasionally, ulcers will be found in the mouth.
Coughing, diarrhea, vomiting and lethargy are the general signs the dog has worms. Other symptoms depend on the type of worm.
Acute pancreatitis can occur after a dog eats a fatty food such as pork, beef, and some other human foods. Dogs that get into garbage can develop pancreatitis. Pancreatitis can also have other causes, including certain medications and some viral or bacterial infections.
Gastritis is defined as inflammation of the lining of the stomach. It may occur as a short episode (acute) or have a long duration (chronic) and may be associated with underlying conditions that are more serious.
Some dogs will not drink enough to rehydrate on their own, so it is extremely important to replenish fluids and electrolytes however you can. Try offering ice chips or a bowl of diluted chicken broth several times daily to entice your dog to drink. Also consider trying a bland diet like chicken and rice.
Stress and anxiety: Your pet`s stomach can get upset when it is stressed out or has anxiety, causing it to have diarrhea or vomit. Toxic substances: If your pet ingests something toxic, vomiting and diarrhea are the first symptoms.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Nursing dog pups 13 days old has sudden onset of diarrhea and vomiting what can I do
ANSWER : A. You can try with holding food for 12 hours. Offer unflavored Pedialyte if she’ll drink. If she doesn’t vomit or have diarrhea for those 12 hours you can then offer small amounts of a bland diet such as boiled white meat chicken (25%) and boiled white rice (75%) without flavoring or fat added. Offer about 1/4 cup every 2 hours. If she continues to do well and has an appetite do this for 12 hours, then transition back to a normal diet slowly. If she continues to have vomiting or diarrhea I think it’s important that you seek veterinary care, since continual loss of fluid through vomiting and diarrhea while nursing is very dangerous to any dog, but especially to a very small dog like a chihuahua.

Q. Which common foods are poisonous to pets?
ANSWER : A. That’s a great question. As responsible pet owners we need to be aware of food items that can be harmful to our canine or feline companions. Here are some of the most common foods proven to cause illness in our animals at home:

Chocolate: A favorite and irresistible treat amongst most humans, chocolate is considered toxic to dogs. In very small amounts it is usually not a huge issue, but with larger volumes and with darker chocolates pet owners should be concerned. Chocolate contains methylxanthine theobromine, which is similar to caffeine. Chocolate ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, issues with normal heartbeats, seizures, and in some severe cases, death. It is best to keep your favorite chocolate treats in a good hiding spot and out of reach of your dog or cat.

Grapes and raisins: Dogs should not consume grapes and raisins because of the risk of acute kidney failure. Most dogs experiencing grape or raisin toxicity will begin to have vomiting and/or diarrhea within 6-12 hours of ingestion. Other abnormal clinical signs include lethargy, abdominal pain, dehydration, and tremors. Kidney failure develops within 24-72 hours of the initial ingestion. There are some dogs that do not experience these devastating side effects. It is best to contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency facility if you believe your pet has ingested grapes or raisins.

Garlic and onions: We often forget that our meals contain these two popular ingredients and will allow our furry companions a few bites or licks. Onion and garlic both can cause a type of poisoning that results in damage to red blood cells, making them more likely to rupture. They can also cause stomach upset and mouth irritation. Look for pale gums, increased breathing or drooling or any vomiting or diarrhea.

Bread dough: Unbaked bread dough is considered poisonous to our pets. The bread dough, when ingested, expands in the stomach because of the warm and moist environment. This can lead to a bloated or even twisted stomach. In addition yeast is often added to our baking products to help get bread to rise, and when this yeast is fermented it produces both carbon dioxide and alcohol. The alcohol produced can be absorbed into the bloodstream and causes dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Common clinical signs include vomiting or retching, distension of the stomach, weakness and collapse.

Macadamia nuts: Ingestion of these nuts are not proven to be fatal in dogs but can cause them to experience uncomfortable clinical sings, including fever, joint stiffness, vomiting, tremors and difficulty walking, especially in their hind legs. Often your pet will start to feel better after about 48 hours, but supportive veterinary care (such as pain medication) may help ease their discomfort.

Xylitol: The most common ingredient used in sugar-free gum is xylitol, which is a non-caloric sweetener. It is also found in some oral rinses, toothpastes and vitamins. Xylitol and dogs do not mix – it can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugars levels. Dogs will often display signs of disorientation, black tarry stool, tremors and seizures. If severe enough some dogs have developed liver failure. Keep your gum away from your canine companion.

Avocados: Avocados are not actually poisonous to dogs or cats but as many veterinarians can tell you the avocado pits can cause a foreign body obstruction. Avocados contain persin, which is actually toxic to the majority of pet birds. The abnormal clinical signs associated with avocado ingestion in birds include, respiratory distress, inability to perch, liver and kidney failure and sudden death.

Go forth and enjoy your favorite foods, but keep in mind which foods you should avoid sharing with your furry family members. Whenever in doubt, contact your veterinarian for healthy and safe food suggestions.

Q. Wants to go out very frequently. Has fecal matter attached to anus but won’t let me remove it. She won’t sleep and wants to stay on my lap.
ANSWER : A. So I’m hearing a couple of problems going on. Frequent defecation with diarrhea (I’m assuming, since there’s fecal matter attached and the anus, and typically it only “sticks” when it’s soft) and lethargy/clinginess. Pretty general signs, however let’s focus on the diarrhea and assume it’s a GI thing. You didn’t tell me whether this is a cat or dog but I’ll assume dog since you said she goes outside to defecate.

Diarrhea may or may not be a sign of a serious disease. I don’t get especially concerned with one or two episodes in an animal who seems to feel completely normally otherwise, but what you’re describing sounds concerning. Your dog is restless, can’t get comfortable, and is somewhat needy – all of those indicate discomfort to me.

Without knowing how old your dog is it’s pretty difficult to get specific about causes, but I’ll mention some possibilities. Certainly parasites, including giardia, can cause diarrhea, as well as bacterial or viral infections in the gut. Indiscriminate eating, which dogs are master of, can cause diarrhea. Food allergies or sensitivities as well as inflammatory bowel disease are on the list. More serious causes include liver, kidney, or pancreatic disease, as well as intestinal cancers.

I’m hoping this has only been going on for a little while. You can try feeding a bland/high-fiber diet of boiled white meat chicken and white rice (25% chicken and 75% rice) in small (1/4 to 1/2 cup) amounts frequently (every two hours). If the diarrhea doesn’t resolve in 12 hours see a veterinarian. If she’s vomiting or won’t eat at all, see a vet sooner.

Read Full Q/A … : Leerburg

Q. Changed dog’s food. Now throwing up and with diarrhea, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. Vomiting and diarrhea can occur if food is switched too quickly. Dogs generally need a slow changeover of foods over a period of a week or so to allow their guts and the gut bacteria to adjust. If there has only been one vomiting and diarrhea episode, removing the food for a few hours then feeding a bland diet of boiled chicken and plain rice can help soothe the stomach. You should then return to his old food and begin a gradual changeover of foods starting with 3 days of 75 old/25 new, 3 days of 50/50 and then 3 days of 25old/75 new. However if the vomiting and diarrhea symptoms do not improve, it may indicate something else causing his digestive distress and an appointment should be made with your local vet.

Q. My 10 week old puppy threw uplast night and had diarrhea this morning. We forgot to water down his dry food last night and he usually eats soggy food.
ANSWER : A. It probably isn`t anything to do with not watering down the food. It is not unusual for puppies to pick up tummy bugs. If he has stopped vomiting and now having diarrhea it sounds like the bug is passing through nicely. If he becomes lethargic or vomiting continues then contact your vet. Has he mixed with unvaccinated dogs? If so and there is a possibility that it could be parvo, but the vomiting & diarrhea would continue and the pup would be lethargic.

Q. My dog has suffered from diarrhea with vomit and bloody stools for about 3 months. Vet has given Metronidazole, but hasn’t been effective
ANSWER : A. Several things can cause a dog’s diarrhea, and chronic diarrhea can sometimes be hard to treat. However the most common causes of chronic diarrhea can be from food allergies to certain ingredients in the diet as well as a disruption in the gut bacteria. Metronidazole helps with chronic diarrhea in some cases if there is an underlying bacterial condition. Checking your dog’s food for common allergens such as wheat, corn or soy products may alert you to a problem as these can cause a lot of digestive issues in some dogs. Some dogs may also be allergic to more common protein types such as beef, lamb or even chicken, so finding a food with an alternate protein source can also help. Natural remedies to help clear up diarrhea can also include adding plain yogurt to meals to seed the gut with healthy bacteria, or adding pureed pumpkin to provide a fiber boost to firm up stools. However, if these things don’t help with the diarrhea, additional testing and treatment with your vet is best.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Blood in Dog Stool

Q. Great Dane, Lab mix is vomiting, lethargic, bloodshot droopy eyes. No appetite. What’s wrong?
ANSWER : A. Vomiting is a common symptom of many illnesses which can range anywhere from minor digestive upset, to mores serious problems such as disease, illness or even bloat.

If your Dane Mix has only vomited once or twice, it may just indicate a minor stomach upset. Picking up food for a few hours then feeding a bland meal of boiled chicken and plain rice can help soothe the stomach and entice eating. However, if the vomiting continues or symptoms persist for more than a day, it may indicate something more serious going on and should be looked at by your vet.

Large and giant breed dogs are more prone to a condition called Bloat, which is considered a medical emergency. Signs of bloat in a dog include a large distended abdomen, pain in the abdomen, signs of distress such as heavy panting, pale gums or tongue, vomiting and diarrhea, or attempting to vomit or defecate without success. If you suspect your dog may be experiencing bloat, contacting your vet or emergency clinic immediately is best.

Q. Lab 12 yr old, vomiting dark brown liquid, black liquid stools not eating, sx x’s 2 days. How can I make her comfortable
ANSWER : A. Sorry, I don’t understand your notation “sx x’s”. As for the vomiting and diarrhea, the best recommendation I can give you is to seek veterinary care in order to determine what’s causing these symptoms. Signs of GI disease that have been going on for 2 days are unlikely to resolve on their own. She may have parasites, may have eaten something that didn’t agree with her, or she could have an infection of bacterial or viral origin. Other causes of vomiting and diarrhea include pancreatic disease (pancreatitis), kidney disease, and liver disease. Unfortunately I think this is something that’s not going to get better at home, and she needs medical intervention.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Blood in Dog Stool