n 02/26

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A. At 3 days post-op, she should be walking normally. It’s not a complicated surgery, and usually recovery is fairly rapid. I’d be worried about complications at this point – possibly adverse reactions to medications – and I would contact your vet ASAP to discuss her condition at this point.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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The reconstructive surgery is called a vulvoplasty or episioplasty. The main challenge of the surgery is to remove just the right amount of skin: not too much and not too little. Recovery generally takes 2-3 weeks.
Recessed vulvas have been directly linked with dogs who receive a spay surgery early in life. Waiting until the dog is at least 2 years of age may be advantageous, especially in large and giant breeds.
Soft tissue dog surgeries will generally be nearly fully recovered after 2-3 weeks and a full recovery will likely take around 6 weeks. Bone and ligament surgeries are far more delicate and as such, will take a longer time period to heal.
How long will my dog take to recover from surgery? It depends on the type of surgery that`s happening. In general, recovery from dog surgery is probably two weeks for most routine soft tissue surgeries. If it involves the bones or orthopedic, it could be 6, 8, 12 weeks or up to six months sometimes.
Age is not a disease, and your dog is never “too old” to receive the quality care he or she needs, even if it requires anesthesia and surgery.
Is it Too Late? The recommended time to spay or neuter a dog is six to nine months. But if your dog is healthy, there is no specific age limit to having the procedure done.
We recommend they are closely observed during the first 12 hours after surgery. It is not necessary to stay up, or sleep next to your pet and you can leave your dog alone after surgery for short periods as long as they aren`t likely to lick their stitches.
Regardless of which type of stitches your pet`s surgeon uses, you will still need to prevent your dog from licking the wound in order to prevent infection and allow the wound to heal. Keeping bandages dry at all times is another key element of helping your dog`s incision heal quickly.
If you`re still not sure what`s going on with your dog, please call your vet clinic and brainstorm with a nurse to try to figure out why it`s happening. The good news is that if you follow the rules, the whining should stop overnight or within a few days.
A general anesthetic may cause your dog to feel sleepy or shaky on its feet for a short period of time. These side effects are normal and should go away quickly with rest. A temporary loss of appetite is another common side effect of a general anesthetic.
Since dogs can get cancer at any age, even senior dogs can benefit from a spaying procedure. As long as a dog doesn`t have any health issues that would make it dangerous to use anesthesia or undergo a surgical procedure, no dog is too old to be spayed, says Chewy.
If your pet is in good health and likely to enjoy several more active years, our veterinarian may recommend surgery. That said, if your pet is approaching the end of life, struggling with pain, widespread cancer, declining health, or any other medical issues, the veterinarian may recommend putting your pet to sleep.
Anesthetic risk increases with age, but underlying medical conditions can exacerbate this risk. Heart disease, diabetes, Cushing`s disease in dogs, thyroid disease, and other chronic issues can cause problems under anesthesia.
An upper age limit in outpatient anesthesia does not exist to date. However, functional rather than chronological age is crucial in patient selection.
A University of Georgia study, based on the medical records of more than 70,000 animal patients, found that the life expectancy of neutered male dogs was 13.8% longer and that of spayed female dogs was 26.3% longer.
An adult dog can be neutered at any time but there is a larger risk of complications. Older dogs, dogs that have health problems, and dogs that are overweight, all face a greater risk of complications.
Some pets will also vocalize or whine as the last remaining sedative or anesthetic medications are removed from their systems, or in response to the prescribed pain medication. If crying or whining is mild and intermittent, you may simply monitor the situation. If vocalization persists, please call us for advice.
These side effects can range from increased aggression, depression, anxiety, or even clinginess; however, they only last for a short amount of time.
What are the typical signs of pain in dogs? General behaviour: Shaking, flattened ears, low posture, aggression, grumpy temperament, panting or crying, excessive licking or scratching a specific area, reluctant to play, interact or exercise, lameness (limping), stiffness after rest, loss of appetite.
Arrange for someone to pick you up from the hospital and stay with you for the first 12 hours after you go home. No pets in bed one day before and two weeks after surgery.
Use a Short Leash. As the recovery period gets to an end, and the dog can slowly start getting back to its normal routine, you will go out. At this point, it is important to use a short leash. The short leash will keep the dog under control and prevent sudden and potentially dangerous movements, like jumping.
Light short and slow walks just for them to do their business is fine until you bring your dog in for their 3-day check-up. Once the vet tells you your dog is recovering ok you can take them on short leash walks until they go back in for their 10-day check-up.
Just Answer veterinarian alhdvm theorizes that a vet may be injecting the solution and then the dog moves (but not necessarily has to) and soon there`s a hole causing the solution to go around the vein instead of inside. This may cause the dog to cry out in pain.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. vulvar fold resection–collie(11 years)–what is recovery time. she can not pick herself up. i can pick her up and she can walk some. done on 02/26
ANSWER : A. At 3 days post-op, she should be walking normally. It’s not a complicated surgery, and usually recovery is fairly rapid. I’d be worried about complications at this point – possibly adverse reactions to medications – and I would contact your vet ASAP to discuss her condition at this point.

Q. How can I keep my 14 year old Yorkie from snapping at the younger ones?
ANSWER : A. It’s all about management. Do not allow the 7yo’s to interact with your 14yo unsupervised. You should be there each time they interact so you can redirect the 14yo’s attention onto some toys, or onto some treats when the 7yo’s are around. It sounds like you need to help your 14yo make positive associations with being around the younger pups. You should be trying to feed him treats each time he interacts with them, and doesn’t snap at them. Pet and praise him each time he is around them, or any time they are near. As I said, keep the separated when you cannot supervise their interactions because if you aren’t around when he is snapping at them, you could end up with a fight on your hands.

It could also be that they spend too much time together. Imagine spending 100% of your time with somebody, day in and out, doing everything together… including going to the bathroom.. that might bother anybody. I think you should give them more time apart from each other. Take them all on separate walks, separate them to play with them individually, separate them when you take them to potty, separate feeding times in separate rooms, etc. This can help alleviate the stress your older dog is feeling due to living closely with other dogs. You should always be giving individual activities in a houseful of dogs anyway.. when you expect them to get along 100% of the time, that’s when you find trouble.

Q. Does an indoor cat need to be vaccinated every year?
ANSWER : A. In practice, I recommend a feline combo vaccine every year, but will generally start administering every 3 years once they have had their kitten vaccines and 2 additional yearly vaccines. Rabies, is required yearly by law, and if kept up to date can be good for up to three years also. Based on the age of your cat I would give a yearly feline combo and rabies, and then boost the combo again next year.

Q. My 1 year old great Pyrenees will not walk on the leash she stops and jumps around on the leash and when I try to walk her she just sits down.
ANSWER : A. At one year, she is right in the middle of canine adolescence which is when new fears can show up. She needs positive reinforcement and luring to teach her leash walking is a good thing. You can take some special, tasty treats that she doesn’t get regularly for leash walking time only. Use these treats to lure her forward a little bit at a time. Don’t pull or force her or it will become a big, negative experience to only reinforce her discomfort. Keep it light, positive, and fun. You will likely only get a short distance the first few days, but within a few weeks you should be able to increase that and help her overcome her fear about it.

Q. I was walking my dog with my wifeand he was acting normal when my wife bent over pick up a paper he tucked his tale ran about 20 feet and locked up
ANSWER : A. So he was startled. Next time, carry high value treats with you on your walks and feed them periodically for good behavior. Encourage him to walk alongside, you encourage him to allow you to bend over here and there throughout your walk. Do not make any sudden movements, and makes sure your dog is comfortable throughout the entire walk. Using treats will help him make positive associations with being walked by your wife and you.

Q. What can I do to help our Lab stop pulling on the leash when we go for a walk? I have tried different techniques but after 2 1/2 years she still pulls
ANSWER : A. POST TWO:
In the mean-time, while you’re working on building up that attention indoors, you should be using a front hooking harness outdoors on your walks. This will eliminate your girls pulling power. The Sensible http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ible-harness and the Sensation http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ation-harness harness are the best front hooking harnesses on the market because they do not have the martingale loop on the front of the harness (which can cause the dog to yo-yo during walks).

Lastly, I’d just like to add that dogs sniff the ground during walks for added mental stimulation. If your dog isn’t allowed to sniff the ground, the walk isn’t nearly as fun or tiring. When you are practicing attention on your walks, make sure it’s in short, small bursts. Attention for a few steps, back to sniffing for several steps, attention for a few steps, sniffing for a few minutes.. etc.

Q. I have a 13 1/2 year old Shih Tzu. How old is he in dog years?
ANSWER : A. It’s used to be that dog years were 7 years to every 1. Now it normally around 5 years to every year as long as your dog is healthy and kept up with vaccines. So he’s about 68ish in dog years.

Read Full Q/A … : Shih Tzu Age

Q. What’s the best way to train a dog to use a lead again?
ANSWER : A. It depends on how serious your issue is. If you need to start from scratch: Bring out the leash, place it on the ground. Click and treat your dog. Say his name, work on attention, click and treat for attention. Work with the cheese sticks, or with some chicken.. something stinky, soft, and high value. Allow him to sniff the leash, praise him, click, treat, click, treat. Pick up the leash, click treat him. Hook the leash to his collar and allow the leash to drag, click treat him. Have him just follow you around, click and treat him to hold his attention.

Then, pick up the leash, click and treat him. Then drop the leash again, click and treat. Take baby steps. Then, hold the leash while you take a step, click and treat him for following. Open the front door, click and treat him. Then, take off the leash, click and treat him, and end training.

Pick training back up in an hour, and do the same exact thing from start to finish, only this time, “finish” will be you two going outside, you clicking and treating him a bunch, and then you bringing him back inside. Work your way up slowly. You can’t expect to just bring him outside and bring him on a walk right away.

When outdoors, use a front hooking harness like the Sensible/Sensation harnesses: http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ible-harness / http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ation-harness. These harnesses will eliminate the pulling power of your pup in a positive way. This will put you in control without the use of force. Carry high value treats with you everywhere, and offer them for good walking behavior – treats like white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks, hotdogs, all cut into tiny little pieces. The more you work on walking on-leash/attention indoors, the better it will be outdoors, remember that.