roblem?

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. This is not good behavior. Rather than take him by the collar, call him to come with you. If he’s not good about coming when called, you can work on that. Keeps treats on hand to to entice him out and reward him when he does go potty and he’ll come to look forward to it. Clicker training is another great way to teach a dog all kinds of things, from obedience to tricks.

Have treats on hand that you know he loves, then simply click and treat. He will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so he has to come to you. Call and click and when he comes to you for that treat, treat him and give him lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When he comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if he doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If he takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until he comes eagerly. Next, try him off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point he should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If he does not, go back to the last step he performed reliably and work on that again until he responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating him every time, but still praise him. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until he comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time he is overly excited so that he can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something he already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Do: Watch the Clock. Give your puppy 15 minutes to do his business. If nothing happens, put him in his crate for another 15 minutes before trying again. If it`s first thing in the morning, he will need to do both #1 and #2—so if he only urinates, return him to his crate for 15 minutes and try again.
If your dog charges or growls at your spouse, don`t punish this behavior. It`s like teaching a child never to say “no” when he`s scared. Boundaries are important in life, so respect your dog`s boundaries too. Instead, your spouse should turn away and ignore your dog.
Don`t punish your dog for growling at the puppy. Growling is normal dog communication, and he is letting the puppy (and you) know he`s had enough. Instead of punishing this important communication, calmly separate them.
Puppies also have small bladders and can`t hold their urine for very long. That`s why it`s important to never wake a sleeping puppy to pee. If your puppy is sleeping soundly, it means his bladder is full and he doesn`t need to go. Waking him up will only make him grumpy and disrupt his much-needed sleep.
Puppy Night Time Potty Schedule

If possible, take your puppy out right before bedtime for a final potty break. During the night, if you hear your puppy stirring or whining, it`s probably time for a potty break. Most puppies can hold their bladder for 4-6 hours overnight.

They can also growl as a sign that they want more affection. Body language will be loose and relaxed, and it may even sound like your dog is trying to say human words to you. In general, affectionate growling is nothing to worry about. It`s usually only a problem when people misinterpret it as aggression.
They Have a Protective or Anxious Nature

It is typical for some dogs to act protective and be wary when somebody approaches their owner. Generally, this results in barking, growling, and perhaps even some snarling.

Introduction of a New Pet

Bringing home a new puppy or another adult dog can trigger jealousy in your dog, and they may show signs of aggression toward the new addition. Your dog might growl at the new dog, guard your lap, or try to get in between you and your new furry family member.

Indications that your dog is feeling jealousy may include whining or vocalizations when you show affection for another animal or a person, pushing another animal out of the way to get attention for themselves, refusal to obey, and sometimes even signs of depression and a loss of appetite.
Citrus. The citrus smell is arguably the best dog repellent there is. You do not have to do a lot. Simply peel an orange or a lemon next to your dog and you will observe it leaving the spot immediately.
Many (but not all) dogs hate the smell of citrus, so using citrus smells like citronella, lemongrass, lemon, and even bergamot can repel some dogs from an area. You can use these smells in scented candles or sprays to see if it keeps your dog away from an area where you don`t want them peeing.
Dog spots can be “cured” by sprinkling the affected area with baking soda, gypsum, dishwashing detergent, etc. to neutralize the urine.
But in all honesty, there`s no `right time` for a puppy to go to sleep, as long as it`s the same every night. While this may be the case, do note that your puppy will need, on average, around 8-10 hours of sleep per night.
Is It Bad For Dogs To Hold Their Pee In? In general, most larger and healthy adult dogs could hold in their pee for 12 hours if they really had to. But it is not good for them if they are forced to do it on a regular basis. It could put them at risk of developing some medical conditions.
You`re helping their bladder and bowels learn how to physically hold it longer than they`ve previously been able to. If your dog can go for four hours without an accident, start with just waiting four and a half hours between breaks for the first week. Then up to five hours, as long as there hasn`t been an accident.
Growling is an emotional response. It is not a “disobedient” behavior. You cannot punish an emotion out of a dog (or a human). Growling is just your dog`s way of trying to tell you something important, and you should listen and genuinely thank your dog for the honest feedback.
If you know that your dog growls right before a bite, then move away and get safe. If you know the growl doesn`t mean a bite is imminent, stop what you are doing. Wait until your dog relaxes, and then move away, rewarding your dog for the relaxed behavior. Take a look at the situation.
Experts in dog behavior believe that, in general, dogs do not like being embraced. However, every dog has a unique personality. Some may dislike hugs more strongly than others, and some may actually adore them. The closest thing our furry family members do to a hug is something referred to as `standing over`.
Dogs appear to be one of the few species that might display jealous behaviours in ways similar to a human child showing jealousy when their mother gives affection to another child.
Yes, dogs can get jealous, but dog trainers say gentle training can help you manage the behavior. If your dog is jealous, they may whine, bark, growl, or push other pets or people away from you. Dogs may get jealous because they don`t want to lose your attention and affection to someone else.
So choosing to re-home dogs is tough. The American Kennel Club says changing owners can be traumatic for dogs. Losing their owners can make dogs stop eating, lose weight, lose interest in physical activity, and exhibit symptoms of canine depression.
Separation anxiety is triggered when dogs become upset because of separation from their guardians, the people they`re attached to. Escape attempts by dogs with separation anxiety are often extreme and can result in self-injury and household destruction, especially around exit points like windows and doors.
Aggression. Aggression from jealousy can be seen in a variety of forms including, growling, lunging, biting, and sometimes attacking. This behavior could come when you least expect it and can be directed at humans or pets.
So, do dogs get bored? Absolutely! Doggy boredom can lead to problem behaviors, but more importantly an unhappy dog. Read on to learn the signs of boredom and tons of tips for making sure your dog is getting all the stimulation he needs.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Husband shamed dog for having an accident inside, and now she won’t poop when he takes her out. Can we fix this? He realizes he erred
ANSWER : A. Good on your husband for realizing that scolding is not the way to potty train! Hopefully these tips can help both him and your pup get back on the right track and make pottying outside successful.

If your dog is still a puppy, that is good news as you may be able to more easily time your potty outings with your dog’s schedule. Even if your dog is older, this schedule may help. Dogs generally have to go potty about 15 minutes after eating, drinking, waking up or playing. Knowing this, get your husband to start taking out your puppy at these key times, so puppy gets used to going out with him, and the urge to potty may be higher than any fear to go. If the potty is successful, have your husband reward the dog with a favorite treat! For bowel movements, dogs may take a little more time, and you may have to stand outside for a while (sometimes even 10 minutes) to give your dog a chance to go. If she doesn’t go, take her back inside and play some, then try again in about 15 minutes. Again, a success equals a treat which most dogs will like right away!

For any indoor potty accidents that occurred, an enzymatic cleaner is great for cleaning up urine and stool. Not only does it remove the stain and smell, but it breaks down the enzymes in the urine and stool your dog can smell, which may deter her from going potty there again.

Q. We have a 4 yr old lab-pit mix we raise from 6 weeks.If my husband tries to take hin by the collar and make him go out to pottie he growls.Problem?
ANSWER : A. This is not good behavior. Rather than take him by the collar, call him to come with you. If he’s not good about coming when called, you can work on that. Keeps treats on hand to to entice him out and reward him when he does go potty and he’ll come to look forward to it. Clicker training is another great way to teach a dog all kinds of things, from obedience to tricks.

Have treats on hand that you know he loves, then simply click and treat. He will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so he has to come to you. Call and click and when he comes to you for that treat, treat him and give him lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When he comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if he doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If he takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until he comes eagerly. Next, try him off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point he should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If he does not, go back to the last step he performed reliably and work on that again until he responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating him every time, but still praise him. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until he comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time he is overly excited so that he can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something he already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Limping in Dogs

Q. My 20 month Cavalier doesn’t eat unless I let him eat from my finger, then he eats. Sometimes he will only eat once a day and leave his food.
ANSWER : A. It is possible that your dog is just not satisfied with his current food, or may be a picky eater. There are several things you can try to encourage your dog to eat.

The first step is to remove any additional treats or people food that may be more enticing to your dog than his own meal. If you feel you must give him some form of treat, be sure to place them directly in his food bowl and mixed with his regular diet. This allows him to get some snacks while also “forcing” him to try out his current meal to get the reward.

Enticing your dog to try his food by adding a pet-safe gravy or even a few treats of plain boiled chicken mixed in can help. Be sure to mix the foods thoroughly so he must explore his own food before getting the treat.

Some small breed dogs may also have a hard time with certain bowls and their collars. If there is a metal name tag on the collar and a metal bowl, the clinking sound can sometimes scare off dogs and make them not want to eat from their bowl. Using a bowl of a different material, or removing the collar prior to a meal may help with this issue.

Your dog may also just not be into his current food and may like another variety better. You can try a new variety by gradually switching over a period of 7-9 days, slowly adding in more new food and removing old until it is switched. This change may encourage him to try out meals again, and the slow changeover will allow his body to adjust to the new diet without digestive upset.

Q. Post-op Spay of a female Siberian husky at 6 months, it’s been 3 days since the operation. What are my limits with her? In detail.
ANSWER : A. Two weeks after surgery you will want to keep exercise to a minimum. Take the dog outside to go potty on a leash to make sure she isn’t running too much. You won’t need to do anything to the wound, unless the doctor used staples then you will need to have a re-check to remove them. Most doctors do not use staples anymore so if you do not have an appointment schedule you are probably fine. IF you have any issues at ALL don’t be afraid to call your vet. Your veterinarian should have given you an E-collar, use that for the entire two weeks. That will help keep your dog from lick and chewing at the incision which is very important. after two weeks your dog should be fully healed. Your dog doesn’t always have to use the e-collar if you’re able to watch the dog. You can take the e-collar off for feeding times as well. Think of the E-collar as your insurance that your dog will not ruin their incision site. If you did not get one and your dog is licking the site please go back to your vet and ask for an e-collar or purchase one at a pet store.

Q. My soon to be 2 year old Beagle/Spaniel mix is giving me a hard time potty training. We take him out but he refuses to go outside but goes on paper
ANSWER : A. Timing is key. Try taking him about 30-min after eating or drinking, playing or napping. Give him at least 10-15 min to do his business and once he does immediately say”Good!” and give a tasty treat. Also don’t rush him back indoors immediately after. Let him enjoy being outside and not view it as a chore only. Pottying should not mean all fun ends. Otherwise, he will hold it until he goes indoors. You can also try moving the paper gradually toward the door you use most often to take him out and again stick to a schedule. You can also try crate training if you have not done so already.

Q. We have a 3 yr old Weiner dog, she is having pus in her eyes, I took her to the vet he gave me derma vet ointment, used it as the doctor prescribed
ANSWER : A. If the pus really isn’t all that bad, and it’s just some discharge, your pup may benefit from a diet change. It could be that the food you’re feeding just isn’t right for your dog, and that’s okay! Dogs grow and change over time, and now that your dog is fully matured, a diet change may be in order. Try something like Taste of the Wild, maybe a grain free dog food, Orijen, or Ziwipeak. These are all really great food options.

If the pus is really bad, and continues to get worse, see your vet again and let them know what’s going on. Maybe you could try a diet change, and then see if there are any improvements.

Remember, you should always gradually change a dogs diet. By gradually, I mean you put a tiny bit of new kibble in with a bowl of the old kibble. Reduce the old kibble by just a few bits of kibble. Throughout the course of at least two weeks (or as long as you want depending on whether or not you want to finish off the old food) you slowly add more of the new kibble while removing some of the old kibble. This makes the process gradual, and won’t cause any tummy-upset in your dog.

Q. My puppy refuses to walk outside on the leash. This only happens when we’re outside… Is it stubbornness or fear?
ANSWER : A. It is never stubbornness. Dogs are not stubborn, they can’t be. Dogs do not generalize well, and dogs display fearful behavior that appears to be stubbornness. Absolutely NEVER force this dog to walk outside when he is uncomfortable with doing so.. the more you force him to do it, opposition reflex – the more he will resist. The more he resists and is forced into it, the less he learns about being comfortable, and the more he becomes fearful of you and of the situation.

What you can do is carry extremely high value treats outside with you. Things like cooked white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks – all cut up into tiny little pea-sized pieces. You can also use peanut butter in a squeeze tube. First, put on the leash indoors and begin feeding him the treats. Help him make positive associations with having the leash put on. Then, take the leash off, and start over in 10min. Put the leash on, feed treats, walk to the door, open the door, feed treats, close door, take off leash. Start over in 10min. Put on leash, feed treats, go to door, feed treats, open door, feed treats, go outside, feed tons of treats and praise. Keep Titus in his comfort zone. If he doesn’t want to go far, just feed him tons of treats where he IS comfortable going. Make sure everything is calm/happy/positive. I bet in a week of doing this, he will be happy with walk further and further all of the time. If ever he is uncomfortable, feed him lots of treats for being a brave boy, and then turn around and go back home. It’s all about keeping him in his comfort zone.. it’s all about remaining within his threshold and never forcing him to feed uncomfortable.

This is very common for puppies. The world is scary! It’s brand new to them, and it’s up to you to make their interactions and discoveries positive, happy, calm, and to never force them into anything.

Q. We have a 7 week old Toy Poodle/Bichon. We are trying to house train her, any tips would be appreciated. Thanks.
ANSWER : A. It’s understandable that she isn’t able to hold her bladder all that well yet. The bladder doesn’t fully develop until around 6-7 months of age. For now, you should be bringing your pup outside every 30 minutes, immediately after she eats/drinks, immediately after she plays, immediately after a nap, immediately after training.

Is she crate trained? If she is not crate trained, I have some wonderful crate training exercises I could go over. Crate training and potty training go hand-in-hand. Any time you cannot keep your eyes on the puppy, she should be in the crate so accidents do not occur. The main idea when it comes to potty training is to keep your puppy successful.

After a while of bringing her outside every 30 minutes, you can try to increase that time. What you should do is wait until the 30 minute marker strikes, and then begin some basic obedience using treats, or some puppy-play! Then go out a few minutes later. Teach her it’s fun to hold her bladder!