ing?

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It is possible your rat either doesn’t like, or likes very much the scratching and so is alerting her friends to it by making loud noises. If the other rats are attempting to harm her afterwards, then not performing the behavior to keep her safe may be best. If you are seeing any signs of illness in addition to the loud squeaking, then having a vet take a look may be helpful.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Often, squeaks or hisses signify that a rat is afraid or in pain. Almost all rat vocalizations are undetectable by the human ear because they are ultrasonic. The sounds of rats you will hear are movement noises. You can hear scratching, gnawing, and rustling in your attic or inside walls.
Rats use these high frequency noises when they are stressed or frightened, and it`s used to communicate the sound of discomfort or pain. Some rats will squeak or grunt when they`re kept as pets and their owner talks to them.
Like humans, rats can vocalize when they`re in pain or experiencing discomfort. These sounds may be similar to squeaks or whimpers.
As rats age, they can become prone to back leg weakness. This is often referred to as hind leg degeneration or HLD. It`s particularly common in male rats. You may notice your rat appear wobbly or one or both legs starting to drag when they walk.
Respiratory diseases are highly prevalent among rats, affecting both their upper and lower respiratory systems. The manifestations of these diseases can include sneezing, wheezing, nasal discharge, and peculiar breathing sounds such as rattling or honking.
Audible Signs

It could indicate pain if your rat suddenly screeches, squeaks, whimpers, or makes any other sound that wasn`t made before when touched or picked up. If this happens, gently feel your rat over thoroughly to identify the source of the pain.

Treatment of Upper Respiratory Infection in Rats

There are no effective home remedies or over-the-counter treatments for URIs in rats, so your veterinarian will likely prescribe an antibiotic. Upper respiratory infections that do not respond to antibiotics within 7 days are generally considered to be viral.

Rats feel pain, but don`t show outward signs of it and may suffer greatly before you realise they`re hurting. Small changes in their behaviour can show that something`s wrong, as can chromodacryorrhea (red staining around eyes and nose), which indicates stress, possibly from illness or social or environmental problems.
Heat pad: Useful for helping sick rats recuperate or comforting elderly and palliative care animals, and vital for hand rearing babies. Electric heat mats with thermostats can be handy, Snugglesafe microwave pads are also fantastic. Sturdy hospital tub or cage: Important to have on hand for emergencies and vet trips.
Neurological symptoms, including seizures, a head tilt, circling, and lethargy, can also have other causes, such as a stroke, toxins, encephalitis, or an inner ear infection (head tilt).
Ways Rats Show Sadness

Lethargy: When depressed, rats often become unmotivated by life; because of this they will become lethargic and sleep most of the day. Lack of appetite: Depressed or sad rats will often begin to have a decreased appetite due to their bodies releasing stress-induced hormones.

Rats are social creatures and need the company of other rats. They use their sense of smell to recognise others, finding out about where they`ve been and what they`ve been doing. As rats are social animals, they can get depressed and develop abnormal behaviour if they live on their own.
Droppings, uneaten food and soiled areas of bedding should be removed from your pets` cage every day. Clean the cage completely twice a week by replacing dirty bedding and scrubbing down the rest of the cage with warm, soapy water. High-quality rat blocks should be available to your pet at all times.
Typical signs of pneumonia in rats and mice include difficulty breathing, termed `dyspnoea,` fast or rapid breathing rates, sneezing, nasal and/or ocular discharge and you may be able to hear `rattling` breathing noises.
Gentle chirps or clucks, grinding, squeaks, and hissing are a few of the vocalizations you will hear. The context usually gives you a hint about whether your rat is happy, content, upset, scared, or in pain. Often, higher-pitched, faster-tempo noises indicate a rat is disturbed.
Rat sounds

Chirps and squeaks are common in mice, but rats tend to communicate at a pitch which is undetectable to humans. If a rat is afraid or in pain however, you may be able to hear squeaks or hissing sounds.

Healthy rats are SILENT. All squeaking or other noises, if they are synchronized with breathing (in and out), indicate respiratory illness, primarily Mycoplasma pulmonis. Even if the lungs sound completely clear, such squeaking is wrong.
Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is a severe, sometimes fatal, respiratory disease in humans caused by infection with hantaviruses. Anyone who comes into contact with rodents that carry hantaviruses is at risk of HPS. Rodent infestation in and around the home remains the primary risk for hantavirus exposure.
The best home remedies for an upper respiratory infection include over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, saline nasal sprays, humidifiers, drinking plenty of fluids, and even fasting and using honey.
Always provide your rat or mouse with all their normal food during times of illness. It is best to make any recommended changes to the diet after they have recovered from their illness. Sometimes while they are unwell they can prefer their fresh food to be grated, shredded or warmed which makes it easier to eat.
Putting your rat`s favourite blanket or toy in the travel carrier will calm him. As mentioned above, a blanket will provide your rat with something to nestle into. To calm your rat further, use your rat`s favourite blanket.
Rats are sentient animals (capable of experiencing negative and positive feelings) and yet both glue traps and anticoagulants can lead to extreme suffering.
Ibuprofen was shown to inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced cognitive dysfunction and neuroinflammation in rats [19].
Ammonia. This is known as a cleaning agent, but it also acts as a poison to mice and rats. All you need to do is mix 2 – 2 and a half cups of ammonia, 100 – 200 mL of water and a 2-3 spoonful of detergent in a bowl. Then, put it to places where rats are usually seen.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Wean I scratch the back of my rats she gows insean sqweaks loud and has her claws out and my ather rats wont leaf her aloon is this a bad thing?
ANSWER : A. It is possible your rat either doesn’t like, or likes very much the scratching and so is alerting her friends to it by making loud noises. If the other rats are attempting to harm her afterwards, then not performing the behavior to keep her safe may be best. If you are seeing any signs of illness in addition to the loud squeaking, then having a vet take a look may be helpful.

Read Full Q/A … : R

Q. Should cats be declawed, or should they have their claws capped?
ANSWER : A. Declawing is the removal of the claw and last bone of that digit, and I would definitely advise against it. Many people assume that declawing is more or less like trimming your nails or getting a manicure, but the truth is that it is a painful and permanently crippling procedure. In fact, some countries have outlawed this procedure.

Not only is it painful, but declawed cats often find it hard to function normally without the last bone and claw. As a result, many cats experience behavioral changes, such as becoming more aggressive.

Besides, if you’re planning to have your cat go outside anytime in its life, I would highly recommend never to declaw your cat, since declawing leaves your cat defenseless, especially while interacting with other animals.

If your cat is clawing up furniture or other objects, I would recommend giving your cat more toys to claw at. In this sense, buying multiple scratching posts would be a very good option.

You might also want to consider discouraging your cat from scratching furniture by using a loud, firm voice whenever the scratching begins.

So, to sum up, having your cat’s nails capped is definitely a better, more humane solution. However, this may not be necessary either if you provide enough toys to claw at, try to correct unwanted scratching behavior, and trim your cat’s claws regularly.

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. Shiba Inu. He periodically shakes and trembles, usually unrpovoked and seeming for no reason. Usually cuddling helps but not always. Becomes reclusive
ANSWER : A. I do find that Shiba Inu’s are a really sensitive breed. I think the first thing to rule out is pain. That could be pain from a muscle injury or even gastrointestinal pain. Try to pinpoint whether it occurs after a meal or not. He might be painful due to something going on in his GI tract, and the pain is at its worse after he eats.

I’ve also seen a lot of small breeds like Shibas get back pain, and shaking can definitely accompany that as well. If you haven’t see your vet who can perform a good physical exam and look for any signs of muscular pain along the spine or elsewhere. It’s not a bad idea at this point to consider doing some blood work just to screen for any problems that could be affecting organ function, for example.

If he’s healthy otherwise, I think it’s likely that there’s something that’s scaring him at home. These things can be really difficult to identify, and you have to be really aware and note exactly when the shaking occurs, how long it lasts, etc, and look for patterns. Dogs can hear things we can’t, and he may be hearing things you’re missing, and the noise is disturbing to him. Cuddling is a good idea, also working to distract him and desensitize him with toys and treats might help. But like I said above – definitely rule out pain first.

Q. My Beagle listens to me, but cries & whines when I’m gone & doesn’t listen to my parents. I adopted him just a couple days ago. Any tips for my folks?
ANSWER : A. I really highly doubt that your Beagle listens to you and has formed a connection with you in just a couple of days. It takes months to build up any kind of serious connection with your dog. You need to work on communication with your dog through training them to understand different cues. For instance the Leave-It cue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1TS5nA7z5Q

You have to work on bonding with your dog through mental stimulation. Training is very important. Luring each new behavior from scratch, and training using treats is how you form a strong bond with your new dog. No scolding is ever necessary… work on being calm, and positive, all the time.

If your dog is crying/whining when you leave, this may be separation anxiety. You’re going to have to separation train this dog from scratch. This dog needs to learn that separation can be a good thing! Tell your “folks” to NOT scold the dog when he is crying/whining after you leave, because that will make your dog MORE anxious when you leave next time. Your dog will be dwelling on the negative if your parents fuel your dogs negative feelings towards you leaving. FUN things should happen when you leave. Your parents should pull out the treats and start doing some basic obedience training with your dog. Your parents should stuff a Kong filled with awesome treats (peanut butter) and give it to him so he feels happy when you leave.

I have some excellent separation anxiety exercises you can work on. If you’d like, you can purchase a consultation with me, and I will go over how to separation train from scratch. It will make your dog comfortable being alone, guaranteed.

Read Full Q/A … : I Don't Like My Mother

Q. What is the disease that affects vertebra on Boxer dogs?
ANSWER : A. There are lots of problems with the back that can go wrong , however one common one is Intervertebral Disk Disease (IVD). This involves a gradual degeneration of the pads between vertebrae that are used to help pad impact and protect the nerves inside the spinal cord. This can cause pain, trouble walking, paralysis and more. Many other back problems can include Wobbler’s Syndrome- a problem where the neck and back meet, or even just plain injury to the back itself. Boxers that have docked tails may also have nerve issues in the cauda equina- a group of nerves that meet at the base of the back and tail and are important in proper function of the lower organs, tail and legs.

Q. My Bulldog puppy growls, barks and even tries to bite me when I say “no” to him. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. First, avoid scolding him and acting aggressively towards him if you don’t want him to be acting aggressively towards you. There are other methods you can use to communicate to your dog that you don’t want him to continue doing what he is doing. I recommend you stop telling him “no”, scolding him, or raising your voice at him. Everything coming from you should be 100% positive and 100% calm.

Try to figure out ways to clearly communicate what you want to your dog. If you want your dog to leave something or someone alone, I strongly suggest teaching your dog commands like “leave it”. Here is a link to a video in which I explain how to do it:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1TS5nA7z5Q

Another thing I suggest you use is a no-reward marker. This clearly communicates when your dog has done something wrong. No-reward markers have to be introduced during your training sessions. You should be doing at least three training sessions per day, that are something like 3-10 minutes long (working on different things each training session). If you are teaching your dog something BRAND NEW, do not use the no-reward marker, as you do not want to discourage your dog from performing behaviors for you. Use the no-reward marker for known behaviors only. Here is another helpful video about this:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdU5a6fXKlg

Lure each new behavior (as shown in the video) using high value treats. Let’s say you’re working on “down” which is a behavior your dog knows fairly well. Present the treat to your dog. Ask your dog to “down” (only ask once). If he does not go “down” immediately, say, “uh-oh” or “eh-eh” in a gentle tone, and then place the treat behind your back. This communicates to your dog that they did something to make the treat go away.

After you place the treat behind your back to show your pup “that was wrong” you need to communicate to your pup “let’s try again” by getting your pup to walk around for a second, and then start the behavior all over again. If your puppy is very young, chances are you haven’t taught him a solid “down” behavior yet. So, as I said, do not use this method until you have lured each new behavior as shown in the video.

This is the order in which you should teach behaviors: Lure using a high value treat as shown in the video. After a few successful food lures, lure with an empty hand. If the pup is successful with the empty hand lure, reward with lots of treats. If the pup is unsuccessful, then go back to food-luring a couple more times. After a few successful empty-hand lures, you can begin to add the cue. Say “sit”, then lure with an empty hand, and then reward. Once your pup understands the cue, begin to work on the no-reward marker.