Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Could have colitis (upset stomach) if showing no other symptoms then I would starve for 24 hours and then introduce food little and often.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

“Blood in a cat`s stool is never normal, but it isn`t always an emergency,” Dr. Devitt says. Your cat`s stool color can help you gauge if changes can be brought up at your next vet visit or if you should call your pet`s doctor immediately.
If the blood in your cat`s poo appears light or bright red, wait a day or two and see if it passes on its own, as it could be caused by stress or because they`ve eaten something bad. If it doesn`t get better on its own, or if your cat is acting unwell or losing weight, take them to the vet as soon as possible.
If your pet shows no other signs of illness and there is a small amount of blood in the stool, you can add fibre to the diet (for example, ¼ – ½ teaspoon of bran or psyllium husk, or mashed pumpkin), or alternatively use a commercial high-fibre diet.
Diarrhea can cause irritation of the lining of the lower gastrointestinal tract, leading to bleeding. If your cat has diarrhea or soft stools, they may start to appear bloody after a couple of days.
Blood clots in poop – If there is enough blood in a cat`s lower digestive tract, it may clot and look dark red and somewhat like gelatin.
A person with intestinal worms may also experience dysentery. Dysentery is when an intestinal infection causes diarrhea with blood and mucus in the stool. Intestinal worms can also cause a rash or itching around the rectum or vulva.
Rectal bleeding is a symptom of many different conditions, including hemorrhoids, anal fissures, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colorectal cancer. You may notice rectal bleeding on your toilet paper when you wipe or when you see blood in your stool.
Both indoor cats and outdoor cats are at risk of contracting worms. Infestation depends on the type of worm, but most often, cats get worms by coming into contact with fleas, eggs or infected particles in feces. Fleas are carriers for tapeworm eggs.
Electrolyte and fluid therapies for hemorrhagic gastroenteritis. Medications to soothe intestines. Surgical remedies for tumors, ulcers or physical obstructions. Antibiotic therapy for certain types of infections.
With large bowel diarrhea, your cat may be supremely uncomfortable and the continued straining will only make the irritation worse. In that case, your veterinarian can administer medications to ease the discomfort and to make your cat feel better more quickly.
Diarrhea is one of the most common problems that bring cats into the vet. Even a mild case can become serious if not treated early enough. Cats can become dehydrated and develop electrolyte imbalances.
There are a few abnormalities that you should look out for in your cat`s poop that may indicate that they`re sick. If their stool is watery or if it has a red, orange, black, yellow, or green hue, that likely means something is wrong.
Unhealthy cat poop may have a soft or runny consistency and be difficult to scoop; it may be very hard and pebble-like. Any color other than brown is cause for concern, especially if the color change can`t be attributed to diet.
Blood in stool in cats can be caused by intestinal parasites, dietary allergy or intolerance, metabolic or organ diseases, and colitis. Blood in the stool usually has a red tinge to it and may look like it has been mixed in with the feces.
If left untreated, tapeworms can cause intestinal inflammation and secondary health issues. Older cats and kittens are especially susceptible to the adverse effects of intestinal parasites. In extreme cases, kittens may develop intestinal obstructions from adult tapeworms.
Sometimes blood in the stool can be caused by benign conditions such as hemorrhoids, a small fissure after constipation or an infection and can resolve on its own,” he says. “However, bleeding from cancer or inflammatory bowel disease can also be intermittent, and so any bleeding needs to be investigated.”
Can food cause blood to appear in stools? In some people, certain foods may irritate the lining of the intestines, leading to inflammation and bleeding. This may happen if a person has an allergy to a specific food or beverage, such as milk or dairy.
No amount of blood in the stool is normal, but some causes may be more dangerous than others. Sometimes there is blood in such small amounts that it can`t be seen with the eye. In these cases, it must be identified with a test called a fecal occult test.
Blood from higher up in the bowel doesn`t look bright red. It goes dark red or black and can make your poo look like tar. This type of bleeding can be a sign of cancer higher up the bowel.
When you tense abdominal muscles or strain to pass stool, vagus nerve is stimulated which decreases the heart rate. Also, blood flow to the heart decreases causing the blood pressure to drop. Hence, decreased heart rate with drop in blood pressure together makes you light headed or weak after passing stool.
After 6 months of age, all cats (indoors or out) need to be protected from internal and external parasites seasonally or year-round, depending on risk factors and climate. Fecal examinations may miss some types of parasites, so experts* recommend deworming 2-4 times a year.
Most cats can pick up several types of intestinal worms during their lifespan, but the most common are roundworms, hookworms and tapeworms. These parasites can cause a range of health issues, including vomiting, diarrhea and malnutrition.
For minimal bleeding due to hemorrhoids or rectal fissures, physicians will usually direct home treatment with lots of water, ice packs and possibly over the counter ointments or suppositories to create movement in the bowels or to soften the stool. Emergency treatment might include an IV in the case of dehydration.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. I want to know from a veterinarian that has owned indoor cats if they agree with declawing? Also, is the whole digit still removed?
ANSWER : A. I am not a veterinarian, but a certified dog trainer. I have studied cat behavior as well, so I have some knowledge in that area. Cats need their claws in my opinion. When a cat is declawed, it can sometimes cause serious anxiety and frustration in the declawed cat. This is because the cat can not de-stress by digging at a scratching post, and a cat feels defenceless without its nails. It is a sad sight to see when a cat who is declawed is dealing with anxiety. I’ve met declawed cats who seem very unstable. It’s difficult to tell whether or not the cats would be so unstable had they not been declawed, but I’ve never seen a cat who has all of its nails act the way a declawed cat acts.

That’s just my two cents.

Read Full Q/A … : snopes.com: Declawing cats

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. How should I interpret my cat’s tail movements?
ANSWER : A. Our feline friends express themselves in many different ways, including through the use of their tails. Most pet owners pay close attention to a happy or excited dog, but they are sometimes less attentive to the posture and movement of their cat. Here are some of the most common cat tail behaviors, and the underlying emotion behind each action:

A flicking tail: Many anxious, nervous or stressed cats will hold their tail in a low position and flick it quickly back and forth. This is often referred to as angry tail, and a pet owner or veterinarian should be on guard for any possible aggressive or defensive activity. If a cat is moving their tail slowly, and not exhibiting the flicking motion, then this cat is at a much calmer state.

Vertical position: Most of the time when a cat is holding their tail in a straight, vertical position this is indicating curiosity and a playful mood. A cat chasing after a laser pointer or playing toys will often have their tails in a vertical position showing their enjoyment. This position also helps with balanced movements. In contrast, if the tail is in the vertical position and the cat’s back is arched with pinned back ears then this could demonstrate a feeling of being threatened and thus result in defensive or aggressive behaviors.

The Tucked Tail: Similar to a dog, a tucked tail often indicates submission or fear. Your cat is conveying upset feelings and should most likely be left alone. This tucked tail appearance can also make a cat look smaller and less threatening to an aggressive cat.

The Tail Twine: Cats will often hook their tail around another cat’s tail, owner’s legs or other objects to show a friendly and affectionate nature. They are also trying to indicate whether they want to receive affection from their owners, be fed or have playtime.

The next time you are home with your feline companion take note on how they express themselves through their tail movements, their ears, body posture and vocalization. You can start to better understand their needs and wants, in addition to what makes them uncomfortable or happy. Cats will surprise you with their array of emotions and varied expressions they can express.

Q. Would a male cat be affectionate to another male cat or would a female be more affectionate
ANSWER : A. The sex of the cats is less important than the personality of each cat. If the cat you have at home is already a strong-willed cat, another cat like that will lead to a lot of confrontations as they both try to be in charge and an older cat shouldn’t be matched with a rambunctious younger cat. If you keep in mind what your cat’s basic nature is, you’ll find a good match. I’ve always had multiple cats and rarely have a problem integrating a newcomer.

Q. Aggressive young cat attacking my other cat?
ANSWER : A. Aggression among cats can be a sign of stress, especially if one cat has just been introduced, or if the other cat is overly curious/friendly toward the scared one. The best first step is to make sure each cat has their own separate “spaces” where they can go to get away from harassment from the other cat. Up-high bedding, quiet rooms, etc can all help. Make sure each cat also has their own litter box and food/water bowls as cats often do not like to share and this can be a point of aggression between them. Lastly, placing pheromone diffusers or pheromone calming collars on one or both cats may help decrease stress and aggression through the use of cat calming pheromones. Fel-i-way is one of the most common brands.