Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You should see a vet to get safe drug for your cat. Don’t give human meds, many of them are dangerous and toxic for pets, also they are easy to overdose in such a small animal.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Glucosamine and chondroitin – the two most common joint supplements. They have a positive influence on cartilage health by improving cartilage repair and maintenance in the joints. Essential fatty acids (DHA and EPA) – The omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory effects.
Only two NSAIDs are FDA-approved for cats: meloxicam (sold under several brand and generic names) and robenacoxib (sold under the brand name ONSIOR). Meloxicam is approved for cats as a one-time-only injection to control pain and inflammation after spaying, neutering, and orthopedic surgery.
When treating pain and inflammation in cats, omega fatty acids and glucosamine can be used in addition to, or in lieu of, traditional pain medications. Heat/ice, laser therapy, chiropractics, physical therapy, massage, and acupuncture can also be very helpful in treating cat pain.
Over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) like Advil (ibuprofen), Aleve (naproxen), and aspirin can also be dangerous for cats. They can lead to gastrointestinal ulcers, liver and kidney damage, and abnormal blood clotting.
Even low–dose or baby aspirin (81mg) can cause harm to cats and dogs, especially those with unknown gastric ulcers or liver and kidney issues. While the dose may be low in a baby aspirin, cats are still very vulnerable to it since it is cleared very slowly from their body and toxic effects can build up.
Paracetamol is extremely toxic to our feline friends, and your vet will never prescribe this medication for your cat. Very rarely, your vet may prescribe paracetamol for arthritic pain control in your dog.
Although relatively safe in humans, ibuprofen and other NSAIDs can be extremely harmful to cats. Poisoning may happen when pets get into the owner`s medications. In some cases, owners may administer ibuprofen to treat their pet`s pain prior to consulting a veterinarian.
Cats with managed arthritis can and do live a long, enjoyable life with a normal life expectancy. We may also suggest some of the following as treatments depending on different factors such as age, co-existing health problems, severity and disease progression: Medications.
Hind leg weakness can occur in cats who have heart disease known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This disease causes a thickening of the heart muscle, which can cause blood clots that interrupt the blood supply to the hind legs, known as feline aortic thromboembolism (FATE).
Can I give Ibuprofen to my Pet? Do not give Ibuprofen to your dog or cat under any circumstances. Ibuprofen and naproxen are common and effective medications used to treat inflammation and pain in humans, but they should not be given to pets.
Stroking involves running the hands with light to medium pressure over the cat from the head to the tail and down each of the limbs. By opening the massage with long, light-touch stroking, we can help relax the cat and set the stage for the rest of the massage.
Along with antioxidants, the oleic acid present in olive oil creates an anti-inflammatory effect, which can make a big difference in pain management for pets suffering from arthritis or hip dysplasia. This all natural solution is great for pets who may be sensitive to medications.
The only outward sign that your cat is arthritic may be a decrease in your cat`s activity level. Your cat may sleep or rest more often than previously. This is usually a gradual process.
Keep Your Cat Cozy and Warm

Many arthritic cats love and benefit from having a heated pad or bed to lay on, and this one is inexpensive, doesn`t get too hot, and provides plenty of comfort and “coziness” for achy cats. ONLY use heating pads or mats meant for animals. Human heating pads can get too hot and cause burns.

The standard dosage of aspirin for cats is 6 to 10 milligrams per kilogram of body weight. However, since cats metabolize aspirin slowly, you should only give this medication every 48 to 72 hours.
Paracetamol is extremely toxic to cats and should not be given to them under any circumstances. Cats are unable to break down paracetamol and it changes the red blood cells in the body making them unable to carry oxygen, leading to complete organ and metabolic dysfunction and even death.
Tramadol is used in human medicine for the management of osteoarthritis pain and is gaining acceptance in veterinary medicine to treat mild to moderate pain in dogs and cats. In addition to its analgesic properties, tramadol may also have some mild anti-anxiety effects.
What analgesics are safe for people who have kidney disease? Acetaminophen remains the drug of choice for occasional use in patients with kidney disease because of bleeding complications that may occur when these patients use aspirin.
Decreased appetite.

You may even notice weight loss in more advanced cases. Cats become reluctant to eat due to the pain or if they have to jump onto higher surfaces to reach their food.

The conditions (cold weather, rainy days, etc.) that trigger arthritis flare-ups in humans also cause them in cats. Senior cats can be given an arthritis supplement. You may notice a stiff gait and difficulty getting around their own home, or a pet that cannot jump like they used to.
In recent years, feline ages and life-stages have been redefined, cats are considered to be elderly once they reach 11 years with senior cats defined as those aged between 11-14 years and super-senior cats 15 years and upwards.
Consult your Vet immediately if your cat begins dragging a leg, is unable to move their legs or appears unable to stand. Additional feline mobility conditions include: cerebellar hypoplasia, IVDD, paralysis, and mobility loss due to trauma or injury.
Degenerative joint disease, or arthritis, is common in older cats. Although most arthritic cats don`t become overtly lame, they may have difficulty gaining access to litter boxes and food and water dishes, particularly if they have to jump or climb stairs to get to them.
Swimmer syndrome is a congenital condition that can occur in young kittens, causing the legs (typically the hind limbs) to splay laterally. The kitten may have a frog-like posture, with the hips jutting out to the side of the body and the feet facing sideways, rather than placed underneath the body.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. Should cats be declawed, or should they have their claws capped?
ANSWER : A. Declawing is the removal of the claw and last bone of that digit, and I would definitely advise against it. Many people assume that declawing is more or less like trimming your nails or getting a manicure, but the truth is that it is a painful and permanently crippling procedure. In fact, some countries have outlawed this procedure.

Not only is it painful, but declawed cats often find it hard to function normally without the last bone and claw. As a result, many cats experience behavioral changes, such as becoming more aggressive.

Besides, if you’re planning to have your cat go outside anytime in its life, I would highly recommend never to declaw your cat, since declawing leaves your cat defenseless, especially while interacting with other animals.

If your cat is clawing up furniture or other objects, I would recommend giving your cat more toys to claw at. In this sense, buying multiple scratching posts would be a very good option.

You might also want to consider discouraging your cat from scratching furniture by using a loud, firm voice whenever the scratching begins.

So, to sum up, having your cat’s nails capped is definitely a better, more humane solution. However, this may not be necessary either if you provide enough toys to claw at, try to correct unwanted scratching behavior, and trim your cat’s claws regularly.

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. I want to know from a veterinarian that has owned indoor cats if they agree with declawing? Also, is the whole digit still removed?
ANSWER : A. I am not a veterinarian, but a certified dog trainer. I have studied cat behavior as well, so I have some knowledge in that area. Cats need their claws in my opinion. When a cat is declawed, it can sometimes cause serious anxiety and frustration in the declawed cat. This is because the cat can not de-stress by digging at a scratching post, and a cat feels defenceless without its nails. It is a sad sight to see when a cat who is declawed is dealing with anxiety. I’ve met declawed cats who seem very unstable. It’s difficult to tell whether or not the cats would be so unstable had they not been declawed, but I’ve never seen a cat who has all of its nails act the way a declawed cat acts.

That’s just my two cents.

Read Full Q/A … : snopes.com: Declawing cats

Q. Our cat of six years has on two separate occasions has defecated on the living room rug and recently pee’d on the skirt of the Christmas tree.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. My 13 yr old male indoor cat displays tenderness to touch in his sides/haunches and it is increasing. Recently put him on diet for arthritis.
ANSWER : A. While tenderness in the back and hips can indicate arthritis pain, it can also sometimes indicate pain internally such as stomach or other organ issues. Cats and other pets will often stiffen their backs to protect the abdomen when in pain. If the pain continues or your cat is still in pain with arthritis treatment it is best to schedule a checkup with your vet to make sure there is not another source for the issue.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo