Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If you have a large breed dog, a TPLO usually works better. Also you have to figure out the reason for the failure. Was it too much activity too soon? Was the surgery not done properly? Was the rehab not followed? You have to allow at least 8 weeks of just post-op healing with rehab and then slowly get back to normal activity. A good 12-14 weeks before any type of normal activity is recommended and some dogs take longer than others. It’s hard or many dogs and even people to restrict their pets activity level post-op because they feel bad, but it really is necessary for proper and complete healing. It’s hard to say why your surgery option failed or if you should have a second one done without knowing your case in more depth. I would recommend a board certified surgeon perform the surgery if it is done again and you didn’t use one the first time.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

A torn ACL requires rest, immobilization, and sometimes surgery. It is entirely possible for a dog to recover from an ACL tear without surgery. Many dogs heal through surgery alternatives like orthopedic braces and supplements.
A revision ACL reconstruction is a second surgery needed to repair a torn anterior cruciate ligament. This is a more challenging operation for the orthopedic surgeon.
Many surgeons quote a success rate in the 80 to 90% range for extracapsular CCL repairs however it must be understood that this is an average and that dogs less than 40 pounds will typically do far better than those over 40 pounds.
The two primary risks of extracapsular surgical repairs are infection and failure. With either type of extracapsular repair, success rates have been found to be at least 85% and infection rates reported to be only 1% to 4%.
If dogs are under 80-90 pounds, depending on their physique, bilateral TPLO can be performed. In obese or heavier dogs, it is safer to perform one knee at a time. The benefits of a bilateral TPLO are a shorter recovery of six weeks as opposed to 12 weeks.
Most people do not realize anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, injuries in pets are impossible. The reason is simple: Unlike humans, dogs and cats do not have an ACL. Instead, they have a fibrous band of tissue known as the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) that connects the two major bones of the knee joint.
How many times can an ACL be repaired? There is no real limit to the amount of times the ACL can be reconstructed. However, each successive surgery may become technically challenging due to bone loss. This requires that your surgeon have expertise in complex revision ACL surgery.
Yes, not suprisingly, the ACL may be torn a second time. However, it`s not the end of the world. The risk, percentage-wise, of retearing the ACL is about 5%, which puts you at about even with the other knee.
Surprisingly, a recent registry study from the Danish Knee Ligament Registry [75] reported a statistically significant higher risk of failure for QT graft (4.7%) in comparison to both BPTB (1.5%) and hamstrings graft (2.3%) at 2-year follow up.
Conclusion: An ACL graft after a reconstruction surgery is initially stronger, but over time becomes weaker, and eventually is almost as strong as your original ACL. These changes occur as a result of the body`s natural reaction to the new ACL graft.
To treat a CCL rupture, veterinarians recommend the Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO), Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA), or Lateral Fabellotibial Suture (LFS) surgery. Because of the success rate of the TPLO procedure, it is the most popular type of repair.
Implant (plate) associated infections can occur weeks, months, or even years following surgery. Approximately 3 to 5% of patients undergoing surgery will need to have the implant removed at some point in the future.
If the surgeon notices any signs of damage during the TPLO surgery, the meniscus is removed. If it is not removed, there is a chance that it will tear later, necessitating a second surgery.
Following your vet`s post-operative instructions will help your dog to avoid re-injuring the leg while it`s still healing. Your dog should not be permitted to run or jump after TPLO surgery until the knee has had time to heal. However, incidents might still occur.
If your pet fails to begin using his leg during the first two weeks, please contact your veterinarian. A recheck should be performed at two weeks so the incision site can be evaluated. Sutures or staples are typically removed at the 10-14 day recheck.
It will be extremely important to not allow your dog to jump after surgery. Overextension of the stifle (knee) could compromise the repair and slow healing time. Reinforce with all members of the family as well as houseguests that these rules will pertain to the first several weeks of your dog`s home recovery.
There are multiple potential causes for lameness following TPLO ranging from simple soft-tissue inflammation associated with over-activity, to implant failure with a resultant tibial fracture. Keeping your pet calm and on-leash for 8 weeks is easier said than done.
More than 200,000 ACL reconstruction surgeries are performed each year in the United States, and 1 percent to 8 percent fail for some reason. Most of those patients then opt to have their knee ligament reconstructed a second time, but the failure rate on those subsequent surgeries is almost 14 percent.
If you wait too long to treat a torn ACL, you`re at risk of developing chronic knee pain and knee instability. Waiting to get treatment may mean that surgery is your only option. Or you may need to cope with ongoing instability by modifying your activities and giving up intensive sports.
The first question has a simple but imprecise answer: it depends. If your surgery was successful with no complications and you plan to follow the rehabilitation recommendations of your orthopedic surgeon to the letter, the best guess is no less than six months. For some, it can take up to two years to get back to 100%.
Airline Flights: All flying should wait at least 6 weeks after this procedure. Some short flights may be okay but then aspirin or other clotting protection is needed. If you do need to fly, you should get up and walk frequently to avoid blood clots.
ACL injuries often happen during sports and fitness activities that can put stress on the knee: Suddenly slowing down and changing direction (cutting) Pivoting with your foot firmly planted. Landing awkwardly from a jump.
Your knee is less stable with a torn ACL, and it will affect your gait as well as how your knee moves and bears the weight of your body. Walking on a torn ACL can cause additional damage to your knee, such as tears to the cartilage of the knee and worsening the ACL tear. In summary, the answer is yes.
In some patients, their knee is not the same. In some patients, ten years later their knee is not the same. Some people do very well with ACL reconstruction surgery, some do very well with second or revision ACL surgery. Some do well with the third ACL reconstruction/revision surgery.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. What second surgery do you choose for a failed extra capsular repair or should a second surgery be done?
ANSWER : A. If you have a large breed dog, a TPLO usually works better. Also you have to figure out the reason for the failure. Was it too much activity too soon? Was the surgery not done properly? Was the rehab not followed? You have to allow at least 8 weeks of just post-op healing with rehab and then slowly get back to normal activity. A good 12-14 weeks before any type of normal activity is recommended and some dogs take longer than others. It’s hard or many dogs and even people to restrict their pets activity level post-op because they feel bad, but it really is necessary for proper and complete healing. It’s hard to say why your surgery option failed or if you should have a second one done without knowing your case in more depth. I would recommend a board certified surgeon perform the surgery if it is done again and you didn’t use one the first time.

Q. I have a 13 yr old Cocker Spaniel who tore a ligament in back leg. She is blind in one eye and deaf. Should she go through surgery?
ANSWER : A. You need to be guided by your vet. The age needs to be taken into account and I would want liver and kidney blood tests done prior to surgery to ensure they are functioning properly. Also I would expect her to be on iv fluids during the surgery. Recovery can be longer in older dogs too after a general anaesthetic. You should discuss in detail the quality of life and general health of the dog as to wether it is worth putting her through surgery. She is probably too big to be left without surgery so there are really only the two options.

Q. My 12 year old Border Collie/healer mix has a baseball size hematoma under her chest. I am wondering if she would survive the surgery.
ANSWER : A. My first question (if you could answer me back) would be how does anyone know it’s a hematoma, and not a hemangiosarcoma or a hemangioma? Hematomas usually resolve (eventually) on their own – they’re essentially bruises. So they don’t need to be surgically removed, typically. It could also be a hemangioma, which is a benign growth arising from a blood vessel. Typically no one can tell on cytology alone (that’s a needle sample taken from the mass and examined under a microscope) whether a growth like this is cancerous (hemangiosarcoma, or HSA) or benign (hemangioma, or HA). If a biopsy has been done and a diagnosis of HSA has been made, or it’s a HA and it’s causing your dog pain or discomfort, then I would agree that surgery is necessary.

As to whether she would survive the surgery, if your vet is competent in anesthesia (preoperative blood work and chest x-rays have been done to ensure that your dog is healthy otherwise, anesthetic monitoring on blood pressure, heart rate, EKG, oxygenation, etc will be done) and the mass is in a spot that is amenable to removal (i.e. There is plenty of skin in the area to close over the defect created by the excision) then I would say her chances of survival are very good. All this is assuming that the mass is subcutaneous (under the skin) and not actually inside the chest. If it’s in the chest, that’s a much more serious procedure. You can select “consult” if you want to talk about this further.

Q. My dog has been diagnoised with acl torn ligement surgery is told what needs to be done what if I don’t have the surgery?
ANSWER : A. This is a common injury in older dogs and active dogs. Not doing surgery will leave the knee joint unstable and painful. It will eventually scar over and may “heal” to a certain degree but it will not be close to normal and your dog may have a permanent limp. With surgery, your dog can regain almost all of the normal function with less pain and less likelihood of another injury to that knee. That said, a high percentage of dogs who suffer an ACL injury will likely suffer the same injury in the other knee at some point in their lifetime.

Q. When my puppy is at home alone, how do I keep him from eating his poop and getting sick?
ANSWER : A. The key is the randomly increase and decrease the amount of time you spend away from the pup. Start in seconds. Just keep it basic. Once you reach around 20 or 30 seconds, end training for the day.

Make sure you end on a positive note. You’ll want to end with something very simple, like 10 seconds once you’ve worked your way up to 30. When you’re up to a minute, end at 30 seconds. When you’re up to 5 minutes, end at 2 minutes…. etc.

Q. I took my 10 mo old Jack Russel to the vet for surgery (neuter) he told me he was unable to find his testickles, what should I do.
ANSWER : A. Your dog is cryptorchid, so he has one or both retained testicles. The testicle/s may be in the inguinal area or may be still inside the abdomen.

I would strongly suggest to remove them surgically. Retained testicles are more prone to develop tumors.

The type of surgery depends on the location of the testicle/s; in both cases is not a complicated surgery and is done routinely.

Q. my 5 month old cat was told to have a surgery to avoid cancer is it necessary
ANSWER : A. I am assuming you are referring to a spay surgery, spaying your cat will avoid the chance of her having mammary tumors in the future, these tumor are almost always fatal. other than this very dangerous cancer it will prevent uterine infection as well and you will have a much happier cat overall.

I recommend having this surgery done as well, it’s not expensive and the risks are minimal.

Q. My yellow lab was sick and she had surgery done and everything came out goodthe next day they call me and said your dog die could they let her die
ANSWER : A. I’m so sorry to hear about the loss of your dog. Unfortunately, with any surgery there are risks and the possibility of death. I do not believe they neglected your dog and let her die, but I do not know what happened. She may have suffered a complication after the surgery or a reaction to the anesthetics. I would ask them to perform a necropsy to determine the cause of death.