Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. He/she should have a vaccine containing at least Parvovirus, Canine Distemper and Adenovirus type 1 .Most of the commercial vaccines include Adenovirus type 2 and Parainfluenza virus as well. Also, depending where you life your vet may recommend Rabies and Leptospirosis vaccination. Please, note that your puppy should have her/his first vaccination done already so do take him/her to your vets without further delay.

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6 to 8 Weeks: Distemper and parvovirus with an option for Bordetella. 10 to 12 Weeks: DHPP (A five-in-one vaccine for Canine Distemper Virus, Hepatitis, Kennel Cough, Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus) with an option for Bordetella and Lyme disease. 16 to 18 Weeks: DHPP with an option for Bordetella and Lyme disease.
The two most important shots that your puppy should have include the rabies vaccine and the DAPP vaccine. Some vets may suggest that you get some additional ones as well, but the Rabies and DAPP vaccines are crucial and are considered to be `core` vaccines.
Core vaccines are considered vital to all pets based on risk of exposure, severity of disease or transmissibility to humans. For Dogs: Vaccines for canine parvovirus, distemper, canine hepatitis and rabies are considered core vaccines. Non-core vaccines are given depending on the dog`s exposure risk.
As your dog grows into an adult, they`ll still need the same shots they had as puppies, but they`ll need them less frequently. Core shots for an adult dog consist of the rabies and DAP/DHP vaccines. All other immunizations are non-core as an adult canine.
If they have surpassed this three-month period, then they will need to start a part of their course again, and will need to have a second vaccination 2-4 weeks later. In these times, if your pet is considered overdue and you are uncertain whether they will be completely `covered,` it is always best to be cautious.
Wait to take your puppy for a walk until he`s fully vaccinated—typically around 18 weeks of age. Again, most vaccines take two weeks to take effect (except for the rabies vaccine, which takes 28 days to take effect). So don`t assume your puppy is fully vaccinated and safe to go to the park right after his last booster.
We recommend that puppies receive a minimum of 3 rounds of vaccines in the first year, and for ultra protection against Parvo, we recommend puppies receive a 4th round of vaccine. Ideally, the first round of vaccine is administered about 6 weeks of age.
Puppies. You will need a worming treatment suitable for your puppy`s age and weight. Their first treatment should be at three weeks old and after that, every two weeks until they are 16 weeks old. After 16 weeks, they will need a treatment every one-three months – or as regularly as your vet suggests.
Like children, dogs need vaccines to help build their immune system and protect against many serious illnesses. Our veterinarians recommend staying up to date with your pet`s vaccines for many reasons including: Vaccines protect against highly contagious diseases, such as parvovirus.
First off, your dog can live without vaccines, as these are designed to prevent certain diseases not cure them. However, you also have to keep in mind that if your dog does not have vaccines, it leaves them at risk of contracting a condition that could have been prevented by having vaccines.
What if I don`t know if my dog has been vaccinated? Respectable breeders will be able to give you this information, and good rehoming charities like Blue Cross will give a puppy a full vet check and provide up-to-date vaccines before they start their life as your pet.
When can I take my puppy outside? Vets tend to recommend not taking your puppy into public places until about one or two weeks after your puppy has had its second vaccination.
If your puppy or kitten is more than 2 weeks late for booster vaccination, their immune system will no longer be as active, and this means that there will be less of an immune response from the subsequent vaccination. The action taken by your vet will primarily depend on how late you are with the appointment.
Typically, it`s not recommended to take your dog for walks until they are fully vaccinated. Puppy vaccinations help protect your dog against diseases, making them essential when puppies go outside. Pups in particular are vulnerable to serious diseases, such as parvovirus and canine distemper.
When Can You Start Bathing a Puppy? Puppies should not be bathed until around eight weeks old. Older dogs` body temperature self-regulates, but young puppies don`t have that ability yet. A puppy less than eight weeks old might get overheated or too cold during the bathing process.
Taking your pup outside the home before they`ve had their vaccinations can put them at risk of picking up a virus. Visit your vets if you`ve taken out your puppy into the big wide world too soon and they can do a health check.
A: Not all puppies, but it is very common for puppies to have roundworms or hookworms, either passed in utero or through a mothers` milk. Because worm infection is so common, we normally deworm puppies just to be safe.
A vaccination programme can be started any time.

It is never too late to start a vaccination programme even for an older dog and your vet will be able to advise you on this. Elderly dogs have a weaker immune system so it is especially important to keep their boosters up to date.

According to BeChewy, medium and long coat dogs should bathe every four to six weeks, and owners of dogs with short coats should bathe their pets somewhere between every month and every three months. Dog owners should be warned not to wash their pup`s coats too much, though.
Some of the signs of parvovirus include lethargy; loss of appetite; abdominal pain and bloating; fever or low body temperature (hypothermia); vomiting; and severe, often bloody, diarrhea. Persistent vomiting and diarrhea can cause rapid dehydration, and damage to the intestines and immune system can cause septic shock.
If dogs aren`t vaccinated at a young age, they will be vulnerable to diseases such as rabies, canine distemper, hepatitis, canine parvovirus, Lyme disease, canine influenza, leptospirosis, and kennel cough.
The mother`s antibodies protect the puppies for a highly variable amount of time – anywhere from about three weeks to about 12 weeks. These antibodies gradually “fade” from the puppies` systems as the puppies` own immune systems develop.
Unvaccinated puppies can be safely socialized with fully-vaccinated adult dogs in safe environments like your home. Most puppy classes require proof of vaccination before you can enroll your puppy.
Having someone assist you will make the procedure easier. With a little practice, however, most pet owners find that they have no problems administering routine injections to their dog without assistance.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. Hi I just bought a German shepherd who is almost 3 months old, h has gotten his 1st puppy shots from his previous owner, what other shots does he need
ANSWER : A. Puppies should be given 3 rounds of vaccinations, ideally at 8, 12, and 16 weeks. Typically the vaccination against distemper and parvo (that’s one vaccination against 2 diseases) is given at all 3 visits. Rabies is given only once when they are 16 weeks old.

Depending on where you live and your puppy’s lifestyle, your vet may also recommend a vaccination against leptosporosis (given at 12 and 16 weeks) and against kennel cough (it varies, but they are usually given two of those as well).

Read Full Q/A … : Aggressive Puppy

Q. I have a jack russle puppy gave hem his first puppy shot my self he is a little over 6 months now and was wondering if he needed a booster shot
ANSWER : A. I would recommend that your puppy have at least 2 vaccinations, approximately 3 weeks apart in order to acquire proper immunity. If it has been longer than 3 weeks since the first shot, start over and do 2 shots at 3 week intervals. You will be required, however, to get his Rabies vaccination from a licensed veterinarian and this vaccine should have already been given. The recommended age for a Rabies vaccine is 16 weeks, or 4 months of age. It is always better to have all of your vaccinations given by a licensed veterinarian to ensure that your vaccine is of good quality, had been stored and shipped at proper temperature and is safe.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. My puppy is urinating a lot. And the lady I gave one of the puppies to said she thinks her puppy has diabetes could my puppy have it to
ANSWER : A. It is not likely that either one of these puppies has diabetes. It is very uncommon for a puppy that young to have diabetes. If your puppy is straining to urinate or is urinating very small amounts frequently and cannot seem to wait for very long between urination, he may have a urinary tract infection. It is quite possible that your puppy is completely normal. I would suggest an exam with your veterinarian and discuss the behavior with them. They may suggest a urinalysis. Your puppy should be going to the vet at 3 week intervals for vaccinations at this age, so you can discuss it when he has his next set of vaccines. The other person with the other puppy should also be taking hers to a vet for proper immunizations and she should also discuss her concerns with her vet.

Q. What solid food should I start 4 week old Pit Bull puppies on?
ANSWER : A. A puppy food designed for large breed puppies can help with rapidly growing bones and joints and can be given in a wet form easily to puppies learning to eat solids. You can also provide a dry kibble for them to try and should moisten it with water or some formula to make it easier for the puppies to eat and digest. As the puppies grow and their teeth come in, they will begin to eat and explore more of the solid food on their own.

Mom should also be on a Puppy formula while nursing her puppies as it will provide extra nutrients to both her and babies while they are in a very rapid stage of growth!

Q. My cat will not eat the renal food my veterinarian recommended, can I feed a grocery store food?
ANSWER : A. Your veterinarian recommended a therapeutic kidney diet because it has ingredients that will help slow the progression of your cat’s conditions, especially phosphorus and lower protein levels. Many of the non-prescription or grocery store foods generally have high levels of phosphorus and would not be ideal for your cat.

To help your cat accept the new food It is important to do a transition. There are two reasons to do a transition:

1) Occasionally a pet will have a GI upset when switched to a new diet,

2) A pet will accept a new food better when a transition is done to allow the pet to get use to the new texture and flavor.

There is more of a chance with a hydrolyzed protein or different (high or low) fiber level food to cause a GI upset. Transition recommendation:

1) Recommend ¾ old diet – ¼ new diet

2) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

3) ½ old diet – ½ new diet

4) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

5) ¼ old diet – ¾ new diet

6) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

7) End with 100% of the new food.

Sometimes a transition should be longer, especially for cats. Use the same recommendation, but instead of a few days, recommend doing each step for a week or more. If you cat is still not interested in the new diet you can research other non-prescription diets focusing on the labels for appropriate levels of phosphorus and protein.

Also, home cooking may be an option but make sure to provide adequate nutrients. A good website to consult is balanceit.com. This website helps you to create well balanced home cooked recipes and offers supplements to add into the diet.

Q. My puppy is about 9 weeks old. She’s a full bred boxer. How often does she need to get her shots?
ANSWER : A. The amount of shots depend on where you live, but normally it’s three sets of puppy shots followed by annual shots for adult dogs. Since she is 9 weeks you can start your first set and set up a plan to get the next two around 4 weeks apart.

Q. What general feeding recommendations are important for puppies?
ANSWER : A. Just continue to offer him food at the determined meal times, and follow the recommended walking, housebreaking, play, bonding and sleep time schedule otherwise.

While you may offer either moist or dry foods until you have settled on which your puppy prefers best, it is important that you not offer the puppy anything other then the nutrient balanced puppy food that you have chosen for him.

If your puppy refuses to eat, do not force the food down his throat. He may simply be adjusting to life in a new home, and stress can alter the appetite of any healthy animal.

Also, do not feed your puppy “human food” in these early days, unless recommended by a veterinarian.

Read Full Q/A … : Dog Nutrition Tips