Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. The best insulins are the ones that is licensed for cats. Depending which country you live in there may be different cats insulin available. Cheap insulin doesn’t mean bad insulin, the more important is to find insulin that will suit your cat’s diabetes.

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Lantus has proved very effective for diabetic cats and is available at most regular drugstores. It comes in both a vial to be used with syringes or in an injection pen form. A generic called Basaglar is also available but only as an injection pen.
Insulin therapy can be used to help diabetic cats regulate their blood sugar through a series of daily injections. This can be a necessary treatment for a chronic condition that can be very costly. A single vial of insulin can range between $30 – $300 depending on the type of insulin your cat needs.
There are multiple types of insulin preparations that can be used for cats in the treatment of diabetes, such as lente insulin (Vetsulin), ProZinc or glargine insulin.
Glargine (U-100 human recombinant; Lantus, Sanofi) is a longer-acting insulin commonly used by the Task Force in cats because it has an adequate duration of action in most diabetic cats.
Bexagliflozin is a once daily pill used in cats instead of insulin.
Cats can enter remission while treated with any type of insulin; however, many veterinarians find that cats have better glycemic control with long-acting products. A higher rate of remission has been reported with glargine insulin (Lantus®). Detemir (Levemir®) is synthetic insulin that has a long duration of activity.
Cats who are treated effectively for diabetes can live for very prolonged periods after diagnosis. Average length of life after diagnosis is variable dependent on which study is examined, however, average lifespans of up to around three years are reported in some studies.
Regardless of the insulin type, most cats require twice daily administration. The maximum total starting dose, even for large cats, should not exceed 2 U/cat BID. Most cats are well regulated at doses from 0.2 to 0.8 U/kg.
It is safer to go without insulin, even for 36-48 hours, than to risk giving too much insulin and possibly causing hypoglycemia (low blood sugar/glucose).
Affected cats usually develop an odd, crouching gait and have difficulty jumping up but they can have milder nerve pain that doesn`t cause clinical lameness. (Human diabetics can suffer from this as well and report pain and tingling in their feet.)
For the diabetic cat, one reality exists. Blood glucose cannot be normalized without treatment. Although the cat can go a few days without treatment and not get into a crisis, treatment should be looked upon as part of the cat`s daily routine.
Long-acting insulin takes about 2 hours to start lowering blood sugar. This type of insulin is designed to last a long time, so it takes longer than other insulins to start working. Long-acting insulin usually does not “peak,” meaning that it maintains a steady insulin level throughout the day.
Untreated, the condition leads to increasingly weak legs in cats, and eventually malnutrition, ketoacidosis and death. Early diagnosis and treatment by a qualified veterinarian can not only help prevent nerve damage, but in some cases even lead to remission so that the cat no longer needs injected insulin.
It`s vital that your pet eats before giving insulin because without any food in their system the blood glucose can drop and that`s not ideal either.
If your cat becomes unwell, is vomiting or is refusing to eat, DO NOT give insulin.
In summary, AKS-267c is a promising formulation for clinical control of DM in cats with only 1 injection per week. Despite lack of any previous clinical experience with this formulation, glycemic control using CGM data was achieved within a few weeks with no incidents of clinical hypoglycemia.
Roll the bottle gently to mix. If the insulin changes colors, you will need a new bottle. Otherwise, a bottle should last from 6 to 8 weeks, perhaps longer. Insulin must also be kept refrigerated.
The 7 symptoms we`ve outlined are increased urination and thirst, weight loss, lethargy, poor hair coat, plantigrade stance (walking on heels), unkempt appearance and an increased appetite. If you notice any of these symptoms in your cat, make sure you take them to a veterinarian near you for diagnosis and treatment.
Diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, is a very serious condition that can be fatal to cats. Ketoacidosis occurs when the body produces too many ketones, an alternative source of energy. High levels of ketones can lead to dehydration and coma, or death if not treated quickly.
Most cats with blood sugar readings too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia) actually have an increased appetite. However, appetite may decrease if your cat has other issues common to diabetic cats such as pancreatitis and urinary tract infection.
For example, missing a dose of insulin can result in high blood sugars in your pet which can cause more mild symptoms like increased drinking and urination — but could also result in a serious medical condition called diabetic ketoacidosis.
Diabetes is a metabolic disease that causes high levels of sugar in the bloodstream. Currently, insulin is being used to treat cats and dogs with diabetes and must be injected under the skin once or two times per day.
Insulin should not make your pet sleepy; it is a naturally occurring hormone that their body produces to help them process sugar into energy. However, having a dose of insulin that is too high for their current blood sugar levels may cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and lethargy (fatigue).

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. What type of insulin is best of a cat? is the cheap insulin just as good as the most expenise ine?
ANSWER : A. The best insulins are the ones that is licensed for cats. Depending which country you live in there may be different cats insulin available. Cheap insulin doesn’t mean bad insulin, the more important is to find insulin that will suit your cat’s diabetes.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

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Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. Aggressive young cat attacking my other cat?
ANSWER : A. Aggression among cats can be a sign of stress, especially if one cat has just been introduced, or if the other cat is overly curious/friendly toward the scared one. The best first step is to make sure each cat has their own separate “spaces” where they can go to get away from harassment from the other cat. Up-high bedding, quiet rooms, etc can all help. Make sure each cat also has their own litter box and food/water bowls as cats often do not like to share and this can be a point of aggression between them. Lastly, placing pheromone diffusers or pheromone calming collars on one or both cats may help decrease stress and aggression through the use of cat calming pheromones. Fel-i-way is one of the most common brands.

Q. My new cat seems to constantly have loose stools. I have tried to limit what he eats but with 2 other cats it’s difficult. He also ate a plant I had
ANSWER : A. Many plants can be poisonous to cats, so if you know the type of plant eaten it is best to look up if it is safe for your cat to do so. If you suspect the plant is toxic, it is best to contact your local vet for care.

Loose stools in cats can be caused by a number of things ranging from chronic stress, internal parasites, food allergies, to digestive upset and internal illness. You can try some home remedies such as adding pureed pumpkin or plain yogurt to meals which may help bulk up the stool some and is safe for your other healthy cats to ingest.

However if the loose stools continue, bringing in your cat as well as a sample of his stool to your vet is best. They can check for any internal parasites which may be causing the issue, as well as look for any underlying conditions causing it. If a food allergy is the cause, changing the food should be fine for your other cats if they are healthy.

Q. We have two female cats who are sisters. One was just diagnosed with generalized lymphoma. Is there risk of being contageous? What kind of food
ANSWER : A. Lymphoma is a cancer and not a bacteria or virus, so it cannot be spread from cat to cat via contact. However, if your cats are related, they may both be genetically predisposed to getting the same type of cancer. Feline lymphoma can also sometimes be caused by the Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) or Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) which CAN be spread from cat to cat. The spread of these viruses is usually through bite wounds, saliva or fecal and urine matter, and the chances of spread among two amicable cats is lower, however testing both cats is always good.

As lymphoma can cause a decrease in appetite, sometimes the best food is one that will keep your cat on her normal eating routine so that she keeps her weight and energy up. Enticing her to eat by warming up wet foods, or even moistening and warming dry foods may encourage continued normal eating and may prevent weight loss from loss of appetite. A high-fat, high protein and low carbohydrate diet (such as a grain-free diet) may also help by providing a more calorie and nutrient dense meal so that every bite is beneficial.