Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You need to see a vet as soon as possible. Could have lung worm. But what ever it is it’s not good to be coughing up blood. Definitely needs treatment.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Respiratory Infections (e.g. Kennel Cough)

But if you can`t attribute your dog`s cough to an activity, if they`re coughing more than once or twice a day, or if they`re “coughing up yellow or greenish mucus or blood, you need to see a vet soon.”

Some of the most common reasons why your dog is coughing are heart disease, pneumonia, kennel cough, tracheal collapse, heartworm disease and canine influenza. Keep track of any other symptoms, such as coughing blood, mucus, foam, etc.
The signs of kennel cough can vary greatly. The most common symptom is a hacking cough. It may sound as if your dog is trying to clear something from her throat. Sometimes the coughing causes retching or the vomiting of fluid, and is often worsened when your pooch becomes excited or active.
Viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites can all cause coughing in infected dogs. These infectious agents can target the entire airway from the upper respiratory tract down into the lungs causing several different conditions, such as bronchitis and pneumonia depending on the specific infection.
While any blood in a dog`s vomit is reason enough to call the vet, these colors and textures are an emergency—you should get your dog medical attention right away. If your dog is vomiting mucus as well as blood, that could indicate a problem in the stomach or upper intestines.
Many dogs with CHF will tire out more easily, have reduced stamina, and do not engage in playing or walking as they once did. Coughing when at rest or sleeping, excessive panting, persistent loss of appetite, a swollen belly, and pale or bluish gums are also signs associated with heart failure.
The Rat Terrier is a generally healthy breed with an average lifespan of 15-18 years.
Give Your Dog Honey

Honey is beneficial for dogs with kennel cough because it contains many antioxidants, enzymes and flavonoids. If you give your dog Manuka honey, it may relieve his symptoms and make him feel better. The amount of honey you give your dog will depend on his size.

If your dog is coughing, you need to call your veterinarian. Many of the causes of dog cough are treatable, but all require medical attention. The sooner you get your dog in to see your veterinarian, the sooner your dog can be on his way to feeling better.
Dogs with chronic bronchitis generally have a persistent hacking cough. Some people describe it as sounding like a goose honking. However, any trachea-bronchial inflammation/irritation can produce a similar sounding cough.
A hallmark sign of pneumonia is a deep, soft cough that may not be productive, meaning your pet may or may not cough up mucus. The lung sounds of pets with pneumonia may sound loud and harsh or may be soft, as air is not circulating through areas of lung tissue affected by pneumonia.
Honey can be a great home remedy for kennel cough as it can help soothe your dog`s throat and minimize coughing. You can give your dog 1/2 tablespoon to 1 tablespoon of honey mixed with a little warm water in a bowl. This can be offered up to three times a day depending on how often your dog is coughing.
Common clinical signs include a loud cough, often described as a `goose honk`, runny eyes and nose, swollen tonsils, wheezing, lack of appetite, and depressed behavior. Most dogs with infectious tracheobronchitis will cough when the throat is rubbed or palpated or during and after exercise.
More concerning, a wet rattling, whistling, or wheezing cough can be a sign of heartworm or canine distemper. A cough that sounds like a goose honking may indicate tracheal collapse especially if combined with bluish gums, intolerance to exercise, and sensitivity to touch around the throat.
What is a heart cough? In heart failure, your heart muscle has dysfunction that might be due to weak contraction or stiffness. This can allow fluid to back up in yout lungs, creating a condition called pulmonary edema. Your body coughs persistently in an effort to eliminate the excess fluid.
Rats carry a bacterial disease, called Leptospirosis, which can make dogs and humans very sick and even lead to life-threatening liver and kidney damage.
Symptoms of Rat Allergies

Unfortunately, the symptoms of an allergic reaction to rats are similar to any other type of allergic reaction. For example, the sufferer can experience skin rashes, itching, coughing, itchy eyes, stuffy nose, and respiratory problems. A severe reaction might involve difficulty breathing.

Breeds predisposed to developing allergies include Chinese Shar-Peis, Wirehaired Fox Terriers, Golden Retrievers, Dalmatians, Boxers, Boston Terriers, Labrador Retrievers, Lhasa Apsos, Scottish Terriers, Shih Tzus, and West Highland White Terriers. However, any dog of any breed (or mixed breeds) can be allergic.
The last Guinness World Records holder for “oldest dog living” was Jake the Rat Terrier, who lived with his pet parent, Ronald W. Johnson, in Davenport, Iowa. Jake was born July 21, 1994, and passed away just days after his 21st birthday in 2015.
Cardiac disease.

Heart failure is the leading cause of death in rat terriers, though this typically doesn`t occur until old age.

Coughing and gagging may sound similar when they happen, but they are not quite the same. A cough is caused when your dog forces air out of the mouth and throat. Gagging is more akin to vomiting, but nothing comes out except some phlegm or mucus.
Collapsing trachea

If your dog keeps coughing, it sounds similar to a goose-like honking, and it gets worse if your dog pulls on the leash, the coughing may be caused by a collapsing trachea. If the trachea has completely collapsed, your dog may sound almost asthmatic.

Kennel cough is rarely severe, and uncomplicated kennel cough will usually go away on its own. However, medications are commonly given to help your dog recover quicker and prevent the condition from worsening. If you suspect your dog has kennel cough, take them to the vet for an examination.
Dry heaving can be caused by a variety of factors in dogs, including gastrointestinal problems, respiratory issues, heartworms, or even stress and anxiety. In some cases, dry heaving can be a sign of a more serious condition, such as gastric torsion or bloat, which can be life-threatening for dogs.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Within an hour our 2 year old rat Terrier has had 2 coughing fits expelling fresh blood
ANSWER : A. You need to see a vet as soon as possible. Could have lung worm. But what ever it is it’s not good to be coughing up blood. Definitely needs treatment.

Q. My new puppy is coughing a lot and I think it is Kennel Cough. Could it be?
ANSWER : A. Kennel Cough is similar to the human cold, and it can be caused by three categories of microorganisms.

1. Bordetella Bronchiseptica: A small bacteria which can result in bronchitis and severe cough in dogs.
2. Canine Adenovirus: A serious and contagious virus.
3. Canine Influenza Virus: An extremely contagious virus causing mild to severe respiratory symptoms in dogs.
Kennel Cough has its own course of 1 to 3 weeks and can be managed medically.

Close environments with several dogs can increase the chance of dogs catching the cough. Kennel Cough vaccination is aimed mostly at preventing the Bordetella infection through an inhalant or injection vaccination. Although not 100% effective, it should be recommended in all dogs that spend time around other dogs, even the park is considered one of these social occasions.

Kennels have their own policy with regards to Kennel Cough vaccinations and should always be contacted well ahead to understand and comply with their requirements before the stay of your dog.
If you suspect that your dog has caught Kennel Cough, you should see your veterinarian. Your dog might benefit from certain medications to speed up his recovery. These might include antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and cough suppressants at your vet’s discretion.

Q. Which common foods are poisonous to pets?
ANSWER : A. That’s a great question. As responsible pet owners we need to be aware of food items that can be harmful to our canine or feline companions. Here are some of the most common foods proven to cause illness in our animals at home:

Chocolate: A favorite and irresistible treat amongst most humans, chocolate is considered toxic to dogs. In very small amounts it is usually not a huge issue, but with larger volumes and with darker chocolates pet owners should be concerned. Chocolate contains methylxanthine theobromine, which is similar to caffeine. Chocolate ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, issues with normal heartbeats, seizures, and in some severe cases, death. It is best to keep your favorite chocolate treats in a good hiding spot and out of reach of your dog or cat.

Grapes and raisins: Dogs should not consume grapes and raisins because of the risk of acute kidney failure. Most dogs experiencing grape or raisin toxicity will begin to have vomiting and/or diarrhea within 6-12 hours of ingestion. Other abnormal clinical signs include lethargy, abdominal pain, dehydration, and tremors. Kidney failure develops within 24-72 hours of the initial ingestion. There are some dogs that do not experience these devastating side effects. It is best to contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency facility if you believe your pet has ingested grapes or raisins.

Garlic and onions: We often forget that our meals contain these two popular ingredients and will allow our furry companions a few bites or licks. Onion and garlic both can cause a type of poisoning that results in damage to red blood cells, making them more likely to rupture. They can also cause stomach upset and mouth irritation. Look for pale gums, increased breathing or drooling or any vomiting or diarrhea.

Bread dough: Unbaked bread dough is considered poisonous to our pets. The bread dough, when ingested, expands in the stomach because of the warm and moist environment. This can lead to a bloated or even twisted stomach. In addition yeast is often added to our baking products to help get bread to rise, and when this yeast is fermented it produces both carbon dioxide and alcohol. The alcohol produced can be absorbed into the bloodstream and causes dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Common clinical signs include vomiting or retching, distension of the stomach, weakness and collapse.

Macadamia nuts: Ingestion of these nuts are not proven to be fatal in dogs but can cause them to experience uncomfortable clinical sings, including fever, joint stiffness, vomiting, tremors and difficulty walking, especially in their hind legs. Often your pet will start to feel better after about 48 hours, but supportive veterinary care (such as pain medication) may help ease their discomfort.

Xylitol: The most common ingredient used in sugar-free gum is xylitol, which is a non-caloric sweetener. It is also found in some oral rinses, toothpastes and vitamins. Xylitol and dogs do not mix – it can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugars levels. Dogs will often display signs of disorientation, black tarry stool, tremors and seizures. If severe enough some dogs have developed liver failure. Keep your gum away from your canine companion.

Avocados: Avocados are not actually poisonous to dogs or cats but as many veterinarians can tell you the avocado pits can cause a foreign body obstruction. Avocados contain persin, which is actually toxic to the majority of pet birds. The abnormal clinical signs associated with avocado ingestion in birds include, respiratory distress, inability to perch, liver and kidney failure and sudden death.

Go forth and enjoy your favorite foods, but keep in mind which foods you should avoid sharing with your furry family members. Whenever in doubt, contact your veterinarian for healthy and safe food suggestions.

Q. I have a 13 1/2 year old Shih Tzu. How old is he in dog years?
ANSWER : A. It’s used to be that dog years were 7 years to every 1. Now it normally around 5 years to every year as long as your dog is healthy and kept up with vaccines. So he’s about 68ish in dog years.

Read Full Q/A … : Shih Tzu Age

Q. How do you treat Bordetella?
ANSWER : A. Kennel cough is a term loosely used to describe a complex of infections—both viral and bacterial—that causes inflammation of a dog’s voice box and windpipe. It’s a form of bronchitis and is similar to a chest cold in humans. The incubation period is generally 3- 10 days. Infected dogs shed Bordetella organism for 2-3 months following infection.

Most dogs with kennel cough recover completely within three weeks, though it can take up to six weeks in older dogs or those with other medical conditions. Because serious, ongoing kennel cough infection can lead to pneumonia, be sure to follow up with your veterinarian if your dog doesn’t improve within the expected amount of time. Also, if your dog at any time has symptoms of rapid breathing, not eating, or listlessness, contact your vet right away, as these could be signs of more serious conditions. Although most cases of kennel cough will resolve without treatment, medications may speed recovery or minimize symptoms during the course of infection. These include antibiotics that target Bordetella bacteria and cough medicines.

You may also find that keeping your dog in a well-humidified area and using a harness instead of a collar, especially for dogs that strain against a leash, will minimize the coughing.

Q. My C. K. Charles has an asmathic cough. Ok most of the day, but worse in hotter rooms in the evening. What’s wrong?
ANSWER : A. Coughing in dogs can be caused by a number of things including allergies, asthma, illness such as Bordetella (kennel cough) or even lung and heart problems.

Allergies and asthma can cause a dog to have a raspy cough, and they may wheeze, sneeze or have running noses or trouble breathing when active or in an area where the allergen is present. Your vet can determine if an allergy or asthma is present and provide medication as needed to help with symptoms.

Bordetella can also cause a deep hacking cough, and is common in dogs that frequent doggy day cares, kennels or dog parks. The causes can be bacterial or viral, and treatment depends on if any secondary symptoms such as fever or dehydration is present. Treatment involves cough suppressants from your vet, or even antibiotics and fluids to treat secondary illnesses. Other illnesses such as heartworm may cause a chronic cough and exercise intolerance and should be looked for if your dog is not already on a heartworm preventive.

Small dogs are also prone to a condition called collapsing tracheas, and Cavaliers are very prone as a breed to heart and lung issues. Collapsing tracheae often cause a gasping or hacking cough when excited or active, and may require treatment if they become problematic. Heart and lung problems such as heart failure or genetic abnormalities can also cause coughing as a sign of the illness. Your vet can perform a complete exam to check the health of the lungs and heart.

Q. Does an indoor cat need to be vaccinated every year?
ANSWER : A. In practice, I recommend a feline combo vaccine every year, but will generally start administering every 3 years once they have had their kitten vaccines and 2 additional yearly vaccines. Rabies, is required yearly by law, and if kept up to date can be good for up to three years also. Based on the age of your cat I would give a yearly feline combo and rabies, and then boost the combo again next year.

Q. Cat is over 13 years old, blood test show anemia, weight loss, increase appetite, thick nails, very vocal, blood test did not show thyroid disease,tre
ANSWER : A. It is possible another metabolic issue could be causing the anemia and weight loss, or a more in-depth thyroid test is needed beyond the basic panel. Anemia can be caused by a number of things including blood loss from internal or external bleeding, failure to produce enough blood cells, or destruction of the blood cells by the immune system. Looking for causes of anemia may help you to find the underlying cause causing your cat’s symptoms. Additional tests such as ultrasound, further blood work and more may be beneficial.