good app.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. This could be a bacterial conjunctivitis. Dogs can pass these infections around, just like people can. The fact that it started in one eye and moved to the other suggests infection, but I can’t rule out something more serious like glaucoma. I feel like anytime a dog’s eye gets acutely red like this it’s cause for alarm, and needs to be checked out as soon as possible. Like I said above, it’s likely a simple eye infection, but get it checked out to be sure.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If you notice redness in one or both eyes of your pet, you should visit your veterinarian to obtain a proper diagnosis. The most common causes of red eye are conjunctivitis, allergies, or irritants, however more serious possibilities exist so it is important to have your pet examined.
Red eyes in dogs can happen for number of different reasons. Common causes include allergies, an injury, dry eye or a foreign object in the eye. Sometimes red eyes are no real problem. But others need an immediate trip to the vet.
Just like with humans, puppy bloodshot eyes are caused by blood vessels rushing to the scene of irritation or infection. This can happen as part of an overall eye problem or as a response to stress.
Summary of blepharitis in dogs

Eye inflammation in dogs, also known as blepharitis, is a painful condition where the eye becomes reddened and swollen, usually as a result of allergies, an infection, injury, tumor or congenital abnormality. Other symptoms include rubbing, scratching, flaky skin and eye discharge.

One popular method is using a warm, damp cloth to gently clean and soothe the eye area. Another option is using a saline solution to flush out any irritants.
Treatment for Swollen Eyes in Dogs

Once they examine your dog and determine the cause, they may prescribe eye drops, antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, or steroids. Surgery, dental procedures, and other treatments may also be necessary depending on the cause of the swelling.

Cherry eye can affect any breed of dog, but is especially common in certain pedigrees such as French Bulldogs, Pugs, Great Danes, and Beagles. Most dogs with cherry eye need surgery to put the gland back to where it came from. Always contact your vet if you think your dog has cherry eye.
Some dogs react badly to common allergens and this can cause their eyes to become red and bloodshot. This is very common in dogs with large eyes that are exposed to the light and allergens such as: pollen, dirt, debris, and dust.
Changes in eyes and ears.

Stressed dogs, like stressed people, may have dilated pupils and blink rapidly. They may open their eyes really wide and show more sclera (white) than usual, giving them a startled appearance. Ears that are usually relaxed or alert are pinned back against the head.

Yes, stress can contribute to red eyes, although it typically does so indirectly. Your body often produces adrenaline in response to stress, which in turn can lead to tension and dry eyes. As discussed, both tension and dry eyes can contribute to your red eyes.
The third eyelid has a cartilaginous frame and a gland at its base, which is responsible for producing 30-50% of the aqueous tear film. The gland is very loosely attached to the third eyelid and in some dogs it pops up from behind the edge of the third eyelid, looking like a red cherry hence its nickname `Cherry eye`.
What Causes Cherry Eye in Dogs? Cherry eye usually occurs in dogs under one year old. The condition arises when the small ligament that holds the third eyelid gland in place either stretches or breaks. Veterinarians are not entirely sure why this happens, treatment almost always requires surgery.
It`s vital that you see a vet if you suspect your dog has conjunctivitis or other eye problems so they can diagnose the problem and start treatment. You should not wait for it to go away on its own or rely on home remedies. In many cases, your dog`s eye infection will not go away without treatment.
In addition, an eye infection can easily be spread to other pets in the home. Untreated eye problems can lead to significant vision loss or blindness if left untreated or if treatment is delayed. This is true even for easily-treated eye conditions such as pink eye.
Pinkeye in dogs is very similar to pinkeye in humans, and it may cause similar symptoms too. Some of the symptoms of pinkeye include pain, itching, swelling, and crust or drainage from the eye. Pinkeye can be easily treated with the help of medicated eye drops.
No stress and anxiety is necessary. This is actually a fairly common condition with dogs` eyes involving a prolapsed gland of the third eyelid, or nictitating membrane.
Symptoms of Cherry Eye in Dogs

Cherry eye can progress quickly. Your canine companion may rub or paw at his eye which can lead to an infection or bleeding. If you notice a red bulge appearing in your dog`s eye, a veterinary visit is a must.

This prolapse can happen to any dog, but there are a few factors that make some dogs prone to cherry eye. “Certain breeds such as English bulldogs, cocker spaniels, and cane corsos have a genetic predisposition to this condition, usually within the first year of life,” explains Vygantas.
Compared with crossbred dogs, the breeds with the highest risk of cherry eye included Neapolitan Mastiff (x 34.3), English Bulldog (x 24.1), Lhasa Apso (x 12.4), American Cocker Spaniel (x 11.6), Puggle (Pug x Beagle) (x 9.5), Great Dane (x 6.2), Saint Bernard (x 5.3) and Jug (Jack Russell Terrier x Pug) (x 5.2).
With both uveal and limbal melanomas, your dog may rub or scratch the affected eye. This could lead to an eye infection or corneal ulceration (an open sore on the cornea), which can cause redness, tearing, discharge, and squinting or closed eyes.
Ruptured blood vessels beneath the conjunctiva may be the result of trauma, a blood disorder, or certain infectious diseases. This condition, by itself, does not require therapy, but close inspection is necessary to determine if more serious changes within the eye have occurred.
Dogs Mirror The Stress From Their Humans, Study Finds : Shots – Health News When people who own dogs are stressed, their dogs also get stressed, a new study suggests. It`s another indication of how emotionally synchronized dogs and their humans can be.
When you feel stressed, your dog senses your emotions and can internalize them, becoming anxious. A recent Swedish research study found that dog owners` stress levels can significantly influence their canine companions` stress levels.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Yellow lab F, approx 9-10 yrs. Sudden onset of extreme redness in one eye, now seems to have spread to other over 24-48 hrs. Healty, active, good app.
ANSWER : A. This could be a bacterial conjunctivitis. Dogs can pass these infections around, just like people can. The fact that it started in one eye and moved to the other suggests infection, but I can’t rule out something more serious like glaucoma. I feel like anytime a dog’s eye gets acutely red like this it’s cause for alarm, and needs to be checked out as soon as possible. Like I said above, it’s likely a simple eye infection, but get it checked out to be sure.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. One eye is more red than the other. Last night he was pawing at it,today, he isn’t. Should I bring him to the vet?
ANSWER : A. Sounds possible that he had some irritation to the eye that is at least not itchy anymore. You can do either, having it checked now to confirm mild irritation, potentially due to debris or a topical irritant to the eye; or you can flush the eye with sterile saline eye wash (over the counter) using care not to poke or prod the eye and see if the irritation goes away on its own within the next 24 hrs. It has shown improvement already it appears, however if it is not cleared up and your pet seems irritated by it AT ALL, then it should be looked at by a vet and tested for a possible corneal scratch or ulcer. These can cause redness of the eye, eye discharge and pawing at the face. They are usually treated by prescription only topical eye antibiotic ointment and generally do very well after treatment.

Read Full Q/A … : Eye Problems in Cats

Q. Weak, discharge from eyes, swelling on right eye, does not want to open eyes. What is wrong?
ANSWER : A. If the discharge from the eye is green or yellow in color, it can indicate a secondary infection. Swollen eyes can be caused by a number of things ranging from allergies to infections, to injury to the eye itself or surrounding areas.

It is best to have your pet’s eye examined by your local vet. They will most likely wish to place a stain in the eye that can check for damage such as cuts or scratches. An ointment can then be given to help reduce inflammation, pain and take care of infection.

Until you can get to the vet, be sure to not let your pet scratch or paw at their eye as this can make things worse. You can also use a warm wet washcloth to gently remove any debris and allow the eye to open some, providing relief. However, if symptoms worsen, or the swelling travels to the face, head or neck, it may indicate a serious allergic reaction which should be treated immediately.

Q. I was told by my vet that my dogs cherry eye was caused by something hitting his eye when he was poking around under a bush. I was told surgery needed
ANSWER : A. Prolapsed gland of the eyelid refers to a pink mass protruding from the animal’s eyelid; it is also called a “cherry eye.” Normally, the gland is anchored by an attachment made up of fibrous material. The most common sign of “cherry eye” is an oval mass protruding from the dogs’s third eyelid. It can occur in one or both eyes, and may be accompanied by swelling and irritation. He may have acquired it by getting an injury to his eye but this isn’t the case sometimes. Sometimes there is a weakness in the fibrous attachment.

The veterinarian will review the mass in the dog’s third eyelid and determine if there is an underlying cause for the condition. The diagnosis of the prolapsed gland could be scrolled or everted cartilage in the third eyelid, abnormal cells in the third eye, or a prolapse of fat in the dog’s eye.

Treatment often includes surgical replacement of the gland in the dog’s eye, or removal of the entire gland if the condition is severe. Conversely, if medications are recommended, they are typically topical anti-inflammatory drugs that are effective in reducing swelling.

Q. My pet is suffering eyes discharge, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. Mucus, yellow-green pus, or a watery eye discharge can all be signs of conjunctivitis, which is inflammation of the lining of your dog’s eye.

There is a wide range of causes for conjunctivitis, from allergies, injury, birth defects, and tear duct problems, to foreign bodies, dry eye syndrome, infections or even tumors.

Other signs of conjunctivitis include excessive blinking or keeping the eye closed, squinting and pawing at the eyes.

Treatment of this condition depends on the underlying cause. In most of the cases cleaning, soothing the eye and applying antibiotics eye drops suffice but is some instances further investigation is required to establish the cause of the excessive eye discharge, and this should be performed by a veterinarian.

Q. My cat has entropion of the eyes. Vet did surgery on both eyes, the right eye seems ok but the left eye is still running/mucus. Can I use Neosporin?
ANSWER : A. Do NOT use Neosporin on cats or dogs as this product can be toxic to pets if ingested. If the eye is still leaking or has green or yellow discharge it is best to contact your veterinarian. Green or yellow discharge can indicate that a secondary infection has formed and may require antibiotics or cat-safe ointments to help clear it up. In the meantime, you can use a warm wet washcloth to remove any excess debris from the eye very gently, allowing the eye to open and help with healing.

Q. Yes I have a Chiquita and her left eye was swollen and red then next it spread to the other eye. What should I do when all the vets are close?
ANSWER : A. If both eyes are swollen shut or you are seeing swelling of the face and neck in addition it may indicate a serious allergic reaction and you should seek care from an emergency vet immediately. It is also best to try and schedule an appointment with your regular vet when they reopen if the eyes are very red or bothered or if the redness spreads. You can use a warm washcloth to remove any debris from the eyes to make them more comfortable, however seeking veterinary care is best.

Q. My Pug’s nose is red and he doesn’t have a yeast infection. He is taking medicine for that. It seems to get worse when he goes outside. Any ideas?
ANSWER : A. Redness or irritation can be caused by a number of things including yeast infections as you mentioned, but can also be caused by allergies to the environment, or even cold or hot weather. Dogs with short fur can often get sunburns on the skin, and the cold may also irritate or cause redness when outdoors. Allergies to pollens or other outdoor allergens may also cause redness on the body or nose. An allergy medication from your vet is usually all that is needed to clear this up.

If the redness is happening just when outside, it may also be that your dog is digging or nosing around in something that is irritating. It may be a good idea to watch your dog a few times while he is outside to see if there is anything he enjoys exploring. The redness could just be irritation from that.

However, if you are concerned about the redness, it is always a good idea to bring it up with your veterinarian to make sure there is not a more serious cause behind it.